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I spend plenty of time visiting other cooking blogs and admiring the delicious-looking food. Despite that, I hardly ever actually cook recipes from other blogs. It's mostly that I rarely make a recipe the way it's written, and while I don't mind "improving" on the recipes of cookbook authors, it seems a little different to do it to a recipe from a fellow blogger. However, when Glenna from A Fridge Full of Food, posted this recipe for Vietnamese Cole Slaw , the minute I saw the recipe, I knew I'd be making it. There was very little improving to be done either; Glenna's recipe was great. She posted a healthier version of the original recipe after a Vietnamese co-worker told her that in Vietnam a salad like this would never contain oil. I loved the improved version, especially after I realized that leaving out the oil would mean you could store the dressing in the fridge for a few days. (Photo below is a slightly different version with purple cabbage; both were good.) Vietnamese Cabbage Salad with Chicken and Cilantro (Makes enough dressing for at least 4 salads, even if you like a lot of dressing like I do. Recipe originally from Nigella Lawson, adapted by A Fridge Full of Food , with a more adaptations by Kalyn.) Dressing: 3-4 drops Green Tabasco or other hot sauce (to taste, or use red or green Asian chile peppers) 1/4 tsp. garlic puree or minced garlic 2 T Splenda or sugar (use Splenda for South Beach) 2 T rice vinegar (not sweetened) 3 T fresh lime juice 2 T fish sauce. fresh ground black pepper to taste (Read here about fish sauce , which varies greatly in strength. Glenna used more, but she had a different brand than I did. I recommend adding a little and tasting until it seems good to you. Thanks to Cooking with Amy for the fish sauce link.) For each salad: (all measurements can be adjusted to taste) 1 cup diced cooked chicken or turkey 1/4 red onion, sliced into rings (or sliced green onions) 1 cup chopped green or red cabbage (next time I might use all green) 1/2 cup sliced radishes 1/4-1/2 cup chopped cilantro Mix dressing ingredients in bottle with tight-fitting lid nd shake until combined. Put diced chicken and red onion in plastic bowl and pour over a generous amount of dressing. Let marinate 15 minutes or longer. When ready to serve, combine other ingredients and pour chicken/onion/dressing mixture over, adding more dressing if desired. Serve immediately. Printer Friendly Recipe South Beach Suggestions: Made with Splenda, this salad would be perfect for any phase of The South Beach Diet. It would taste great with something like Thai Barbecue Chicken with Cilantro or Roasted Salmon with Balsamic Sauce . For phase two or three you could add something like Brown Rice with Cashews and Herbs .

Source: kalynskitchen.blogspot.com

It's time for me to host Weekend Herb Blogging again, and it's hard to believe it's been four weeks since I posted the favorite herb recipes from around the world . Time marches on, and a lot of people are cooking delicious food and blogging each weekend about interesting plants, herbs, veggies, and flowers. Don't forget I'm only hosting on the first Sunday of each month now, and so it doesn't get confusing you can check Who's Hosting Weekend Herb Blogging in the right sidebar of Kalyn's Kitchen. That's the best place to look for the host's e-mail address; a few people got inadvertently skipped last week because they were sent to the wrong place. My apologies for the confusion, but no worries, I'm just including them this week. I'm very excited by all the great blogs signed up for a turn to host (some more than once!) Here's a little clue about next week's host . If you'd like to give it a try, send me an e-mail at kalynskitchen AT comcast DOT net. One more piece of business before we get down to recipes. I'm thinking that since Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve both fall on a Sunday, we may want to skip those two weeks and have WHB go on hiatus the last two weeks in December. I'm guessing a lot of people won't be blogging much during that time. In the comments, let me know what you think about that idea. Longview, Washington, U.S.A. Chrispy from Experimentation of Taste wrote about one of my favorite veggies. Last week she posted The How-to of Winter Squash , complete with lots of information about varieties of squash, the history of its use, and of course, recipes. Then this week Chrispy shows us some more interesting ways to incorporate squash into your diet . Don't miss this; I'm trying one of these ideas right away. Weimar, Germany Meeta from What's For Lunch Honey was also inadvertently skipped last week, so I'm adding that link here to be sure you got to see her delicious Baked Potato with Ricotta and Chanterelle Mushrooms . Meeta also has a very spiffy looking new blog header, so check it out! New Jersey, U.S.A. Over at Sweetnicks , Cate is always busy, but she finds time to whip up a delicious sounding Chicken Piccata , with a little parsley adding a touch of herby goodness.. Pistoia, Tuscany, Italy Ilva from Lucullian Delights is checking in early this week, with a recipe for Rosemary Scented Apple Jellies that sounds quite fabulous, and her photos are equally wow-inducing, as usual. (If she lived by me, I'd love to go to her house for food-styling lessons!) The Triangle, North Carolina, U.S.A. The topic is capers for Pookah from What's Cooking in Carolina , and she shares two fabulous sounding recipes for Olive Tapenade and Chicken Picatta , both featuring those yummy little morsels. Toronto, Canada Two fabulous sounding recipes featuring fresh herbs come next from Ruth of Once Upon a Feast , first Griddled Eggplant Roll-Ups with fresh mint, paired with Salmon Coulibiac with fresh dill. Melbourne, Australia Lots of fruits are used as vegetables, but what vegetable is used as a fruit? That's the interesting question posed by Anh of Food Lover's Journey , who answers with Rhubard, and a great recipe for Rhubarb Streusel Loaf . Southwestern Virginia, U.S.A. Coffeepot from Coffee and Cornbread has just gotten some exciting news about upcoming grandchildren, and life has been hectic lately, so she takes time out by creating a simple, but delicious sounding dinner of Pesto Fettucine and Broiled Tomatoes . Trinidad, California, U.S.A. The cupboards are bare at the home of Christine from Christine Cooks , but she proves what an innovative cook she is by whipping up an amazing sounding Red Curry Soup with Chicken, Edamame and Cilantro . (Did I mention how jealous I am that Christine is growing cilantro?) New Jersey, U.S.A. At Malabar Spices , Shaheen's blog is looking great and she's cooking from one of my favorite cookbooks to create Gobi Chole or Curried Cauliflower with Chickpeas , improved by Shaheen's own garam masala blend, which she also gives the recipe for. New Mexico, U.S.A. From her New Mexico paradise, Karina the Gluten Free Goddess checks in with a fabulous sounding Black Bean and Red Chile Soup , plus a post full of red and green chile information and cookbook recommendations. New Jersey, U.S.A. Rosemary Sandwich Crackers with Bacon Cheese are this week's creative offering from the always creative cook Gattina , and don't miss the mouth-watering photo. (I want some right now.) Davis, California, U.S.A. I love the way that people who do Weekend Herb Blogging end up becoming blog friends, and I notice that another herb blogger has already tried the recipe for Nigella Lawson's Chocolate Chip Chili with Cardomom , posted this week by Sher from What Did You Eat? Sher gives great step-by-step photos, making me hanker to try it myself. Kronshagen, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany Ulrike of Kuchenlatein is making a dreamy looking soup this week, but it's the parsley pesto that puts her Potato Soup with Parsley Pesto over the top, and the photo is fabulous. North Carolina, U.S.A. I love the photo header on the blog of JMom from In Our Kitchen , who sends a recipe for Herbed Potato Crab Cakes with Basil Aoili this week. The crab cakes sound just fantastic. South of France, near the border of Spain It's great to welcome back Riana of Garlic Breath who's been thinking of ways to use up an endless supply of cabbage. She has some creative suggestions, including one of my favorites, fish tacos, and a great recipe for Hot and Sour Soup with Cabbage . Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Welcome to a new Herb Blogger, Becky from Key Lime and Coconut , who starts off with a great entry loaded with information about cranberries. Becky makes a savory Cranberry Rice , which sounds interesting, but she warns, beware of the exploding cramberries! Mill Valley, California, U.S.A. Anna from Anna's Cool Finds has a problem I can relate to, using up those big pantry items from Costco! Anna is very innovative though, coming up with Dilled Corn and Potato Salad and Salmon Cakes , both of which sound delightful. Melbourne, Australia A very interesting looking Asparagus Polonaise comes next, in which Haalo from Cook (almost) Anything At Least Once tops pefectly cooked asparagus with a sauce featuring butter, breadcrumbs, eggs, and parsley. How could you go wrong with those ingredients? Heart of the Vendee, France Kate from Thyme for Cooking has a great new pan, which inspires her to create Braised Chicken with Tarragon Cream , a dish that sounds fabulous. If you want to see more fabulous sounding food, check out the weekly menu in the sidebar. Sydney, Australia Anna from Morsels and Musings has been having computer problems and entertaining visitors, but she's back with a fabulous sounding Colombian Clam Soup or Sopa de Amenjas . (Anna also has some exciting news which I better not share because I'm not sure she's announced it on her blog, but stay tuned!) Bloomington, U.S.A. You must read this next entry which comes from Burcu at Almost Turkish Recipes . She tells about Pogacas (missing several diacritical marks, which I don't know how to make, sorry!) a type of savory pastry or bread eaten in Turkey, and the recipe for Dill-Feta Pogaca (Dereotlu Peynirli Pogaca) sounds just fantastic. Nantes, France Whenever I visit the blog of Virginie of Absolutely Green , I love to try to read a bit of the French before I click the English translation button. If your French is non-existent, just click right to English to read where carob comes from and how Virginie makes a delightful carob drink with marshmallow . New York City, New York, U.S.A. The Chocolate Lady at In Mol Araan is a big herb enthusiast, and she shared previously when she acquired a book from the 16th century called Gerald's Herball. Now she has a great new find, A New Herbal, or Historie of Plants , a facsimile edition of Henry Lyte's 1619 translation of Rembert Dodoens' 1554 Cruyde Boeck. Southern California, U.S.A. I keep telling Surfindaave, The Serendipitious Chef , that he should be writing a narrative cookbook, and this entry shows why I think so. Dave has written about Amaranth, the grain, the greens, the puffed version of the grain, and a delightful dish that combines them all into Chicken in Amaranth Sauce on Cheesy Amaranth Grits . There's also a bit of the history of this interesting plant thrown in to read with dinner. Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A. My own post this week was the first of my series on Thanksgiving on the South Beach Diet, and I featured rosemary as my herb of choice. It was a delightful flavor addition to a dish that I absolutely loved, Roasted Butternut Squash with Rosemary and Balsamic Vinegar . If you followed my link above you already know it, but next week's host will be Meeta of What's For Lunch Honey? If you're blogging about any type of herb, plant, veggie, or flower, include a link to What's for Lunch Honey and the words Weekend Herb Blogging, and then send the link in an e-mail to blogmeeta AT gmail DOT com. TECHNORATI TAGS: Food Recipes Cooking Weekend Herb Blogging

Source: kalynskitchen.blogspot.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I've made this dessert for years, in forms both plain and fancy. I first had the pudding as a child when it was prepared by a Swedish neighbor for a Midsummer's Eve celebration. I developed a fancy for its tart berry sweetness and it was one of the first desserts I made as a bride. Once I had my own kitchen, I turned to recipes that had been develop by British food writers. I suspect I was working on the theory that no one knows puddings better than the Brits, and if I wanted the very best recipe for summer pudding, I'd most likely find it tucked somewhere within their collective writings. So, in flights of fancy, I moved across the pond and dallied with the likes of Nigel Slater and Nigella Lawson, who curiously enough, led me back to the Hamptons and the kitchen of Ina Garten, where I finally found the pudding of my dreams. On a more practical note, as you glance through the recipe you'll notice that no provision is made for greasing the pudding mold. That's because it is not necessary. If you have weighted the pudding and let it chill overnight, it will release once it is freed from the sides of the mold with a knife. I've also come to the conclusion that the bread you use for the pudding is not as important as many would lead you to believe. Brioche or challah are both wonderful, but a good quality sandwich bread works well too. The colors of this pudding, especially when it is served with a mound of whipped cream, make it a perfect dessert for an upscale the 4th of July celebration. I do hope you'll try this recipe. Those of you who like barely sweet and seasonal treats will be in heaven. Here's Ina's recipe. Summer Pudding ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Ina Garten Ingredients: Pudding 1 pint strawberries, cored and sliced 1-1/2 cups sugar 3 cups ( 3 1/2-pint containers) fresh raspberries, plus additional for garnish 1 pint blueberries, plus additional for garnish 2 tablespoons framboise (or other raspberry liqueur) 1 to 1-1/2 pounds brioche or other egg bread Topping 1 cup (1/2 pint) heavy cream, cold 3 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1 tablespoon dark rum Directions: 1) Combine strawberries, sugar and 1/4 cup water in a large (6- to 8-quart) saucepan and cook uncovered over medium-low heat 5 minutes. Add 2 cups raspberries and all blueberries and cook 5 more minutes, stirring occasionally, until mixture simmers. Continue cooking 1 minute. Remove from heat and add remaining raspberries and framboise. 2) Slice bread into 1/2-inch-thick slices and remove crusts. Ladle about 1/2 cup cooked berry mixture into bottom of soufflé dish (approximately 7-1/2 inches across by 3 inches high). Arrange one layer of bread slices side by side in a circular pattern (this will become the top when pudding is unmolded). Add more berry mixture to saturate. Continue adding bread, slicing to fit mold, and berry mixture. Finish with bread, and top with any remaining berry mixture. 3) Cover pudding loosely with plastic wrap and place a plate (with approximately the same diameter as inside of mold) on top. Weight with a heavy can and refrigerate. Remove weight after 6 to 8 hours. Continue to refrigerate overnight or up to 2 days. Yield: 8 servings. 4) Just before serving, whip cream in a small bowl until it starts to thicken. Add sugar, vanilla and rum. Continue to whip until stiff peaks form. 5) To serve: Run a knife around outside of pudding; unmold onto a serving plate. Garnish with fresh fruit. Serve in wedges with whipped cream. yield: 8 servings. One Year Ago Today. Martha Stewart's Spaghetti 101 Two Years Ago Today: Strawberry Souffle Three Years Ago Today: Chicken Wellington

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

These little darlings gave me such a hard time while unmolding them that I kept thinking of a song I love, Erasure’s “Here I go impossible again”. :D The workout made me wonder why Ms. Lawson’s photo for these mini cakes shows them still in the pan they were baked, but it was worth it: the mini sponges were delicious and had an amazing texture – the syrup really gets into them, enhancing the citrus flavor. Yum! I used both lemons and limes here but if you want to make the original recipe use just limes. Mini citrus syrup sponges from How to Be a Domestic Goddess ½ cup (113g) unsalted butter, softened ½ cup + 1 tablespoon (112g) sugar 2 large eggs zest of 1 lime zest of 1 lemon 1 cup + 2 tablespoons (160g) self-rising cake flour pinch of salt 4 tablespoons milk Syrup: 2 tablespoons lime juice, plus zest for decoration 2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus zest for decoration ½ cup (70g) confectioners’ sugar Preheat the over to 180ºC/350ºF; generously butter an 8-cup mini-loaf pan. Cream together the butter and sugar, and add the eggs and zest, beating them in well. Add the flour and salt, folding in gently, and then the milk. Spoon into the mini-loaf pan, and cook for 25 minutes. While the cakes are cooking, prepare the syrup by putting the lime and lemon juices and sugar into a small saucepan and heating gently so that the sugar dissolves. As soon as the mini-sponges are ready, take them out of the oven and prick them with a cake-tester all over. Pour over the syrup evenly. Try to let the middle absorb the liquid as well as the sides, then leave it to soak up the rest. Don’t try to take the cakes out of the pan until they have cooled slightly and the syrup looks like it has been absorbed, but be aware that if you leave these to cool completely they might be very difficult to get out of the pan. So, after an hour or two, turn them out onto a rack and grate some lime zest over them before serving. Makes 8 – I halved the recipe, used a muffin pan (each well holds 1/3 cup batter) and got 5 mini cakes

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

2 1/4 lbs cocktail sausage links 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1/2 cup honey 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 Preheat the oven to 200C/400 degrees F. 2 Separate the sausages if they are linked and arrange them in a large, shallow-sided roasting tin. 3 Whisk together the oil, honey and soy sauce and pour over the sausages. 4 Mix all together. 5 Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. 6 Give them a stir about halfway through cooking.

Source: food.com

410 g evaporated milk 700 ml skim milk 500 g pasta 300 g broccoli 1 teaspoon mustard powder 90 g butter (or margarine) 75 g flour 250 g cheese (cheddar grated) pepper salt 1 Preheat oven to gas mark 7. Mix milk and evaporated milk together in a jug. In a medium lidded saucepan melt the butter add the flour and stir cooking on a low heat until it smells biscuity and has gone golden. 2 Take the pan off the heat add the milk mixture little by little whisking each addition thoroughly to incorporate until it is all added. Add mustard powder. 3 Put pan back on medium heat and stirring with wooden spoon cook for approx 10 minutes until thickened and flouriness has been cooked away. Add 3/4 cheese, saving a bit for the top of the mac. 4 Boil the kettle and place hot water in a new large saucepan. Salt well and then add macaroni. Bring to boil and cook for a couple minutes less than packet instructions. 5 Mix the pasta, broccoli and cheese sauce in a large oven-proof dish, Sprinkle over remaining cheese and bake for 20 minutes.

Source: food.com

2 1/4 cups cold water , for poaching the fish 2 limes , leaves torn into pieces (or use extra lime zest and juice) 4 approximately 1-inch thick salmon fillets , preferably organic, skinned (about 1 1/2 pounds in total) 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 teaspoon oil 1 onion , finely chopped 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1 cup basmati rice 3 hard-boiled eggs , quartered (optional) 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves , plus more, for garnish 1 lime , zested and juiced plus lime segments, for garnish fish sauce , to taste (recommended -- nam pla) 1 Preheat the oven to 425°F Pour the water into a roasting pan, add the lime leaves and then the salmon. Cover the pan with foil, put in the oven and cook for about 15 minutes, by which time the salmon should be tender. Remove the pan from the oven and drain the liquid off into a pitcher. Keep the fish warm simply by replacing the foil on the pan. 2 Melt the butter in a wide, heavy saucepan that has a tight-fitting lid, and add the oil to stop the butter burning. Soften the onion in the pan and add the spices, then keep cooking till the onion is slightly translucent and suffused with soft perfume of the spices. Add the rice and stir with a wooden spoon so that it's all well coated. There's not enough onion to give a heavy coating: just make sure the rice is fragrantly slicked. 3 Pour in the reserved liquid from the pitcher, about 2 1/4 cups, and stir before covering with the lid and cooking gently for 15 minutes. 4 At the end of the cooking time, when the rice is tender and has lost all chalkiness, turn off the heat, remove the lid, cover the pan with a dish towel and then replace the lid. This will help absorb any extra moisture from the rice. It is also the best way to let the rice stand without getting sticky or cold. 5 Just before you want to eat, drain off any extra liquid that's collected in the dish with the salmon, then flake the fish with a fork. Add to it the rice, egg, cilantro, lime juice and a drop or 2 of fish sauce. Stir gently to mix (use a couple of wooden paddles or spatulas) and taste to see if you want any more lime juice or fish sauce. Sprinkle over the zest from the 2 juiced halves of the lime and serve. You can garnish with lime segments and a small handful of freshly chopped cilantro.

Source: food.com

Cherry Coke Float Cupcakes adapted from Nigella Lawson's 'How to be a Domestic Goddess' makes 12 cupcakes Cupcakes 1 1/2 Cups flour 3/4 Cup sugar 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/4 tsp salt 1 large egg 1/2 Cup buttermilk 2 tsp vanilla 1/2 cup unsalted butter 3 Tbs cocoa powder 3/4 Cup Coca-Cola 1/4 cup marachino cherry syrup 24 marachino cherries whipped cream frosting ice-cream chocolate shell Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. 2. In a bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat the egg, buttermilk, and vanilla in a second bowl. In a saucepan, boil the Coca-Cola, and cherry syrup gently for five minutes. Melt in the butter and cocoa powder. 3. Pour into the dry ingredients, stir well with a wooden spoon, and then add the liquid ingredients, beating until everything is blended. 4. Pour into the cupcake pans and push a cherry into the center of each cupcake. Bake for 15 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean. 5. When cool frost with whipped cream. Drizzle on chocolate glaze and top with a marachino cherry.

Source: cookeatshare.com

3 cups frozen peas 3 cups vegetable broth , heated to boiling 1 scallion , torn in half 8 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese 1 Add peas and scallion to vegetable broth. Return to the boil and cook until peas are tender, about 10 minutes. Discard scallion. 2 Snip or dice mozzarella into small bits. Add to blender. Add peas and broth to blender. Remove center of lid, cover with dishtowel, and blitz until smooth.

Source: food.com

2 Cornish hens 2 tablespoons garlic oil or 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 sweet potato (1 lb.) 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon watercress (1-2 bunches) kosher salt lime juice (a good squirt) 1 Preheat the oven to 425°; place the birds in a small baking pan or foil pan; pouring over 1 tablespoon of oil. 2 Cut the unpeeled sweet potato into 2 ½ inch cubes and put them into another smallish pan or foil pan. 3 Pour over the other tablespoon of oil and sprinkle over the spices, then toss everything together by shaking the pan. 4 Cook both the hens and sweet potatoes in the preheated oven for 45 minutes. 5 Put each Cornish hen on a plate, with a tangle of water cress and the sweet potatoes alonside. 6 Sprinkle with kosher salt to taste and spritz with lime juice.

Source: food.com

1 onion , peeled 1 celery rib 2 tablespoons garlic oil 1 teaspoon dried thyme 2 (14 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 3 1/3 cups water (use the tomato cans, you need 2 full cans) 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt , flakes or 1/2 teaspoon table salt fresh ground black pepper , to taste 1 Puree onion and celery to mush in food processor. Remove 2 tbsp of puree and set aside in a small bowl for the meatballs. 2 Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat until shimmering. (If you don't have garlic oil, saute 1 thinly sliced garlic clove in 2 tbsp oil until golden brown and very fragrant, about 3 minutes; remove and discard garlic before proceeding.) Reduce to medium-low, add vegetable puree and thyme, and cook, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. 3 Add tomatoes, water, sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a gentle boil, then reduce to a simmer and let cook while prepping the meatballs. 4 Add all meatball ingredients to reserved vegetable puree. Mix gently to combine; avoid over-mixing to prevent the meatballs from being leaden and heavy. 5 Form mixture into approximately 50 meatballs (each should be about one heaping teaspoon). Once all the meatballs are formed, add them to the simmering sauce. Continue to simmer 30 minutes, or until the meatballs are cooked through.

Source: food.com

1 day-old loaf unsliced white bread, crust removed and broken into 3/4-inch cubes 2 pints whole milk (1 liter) 1 onion , peeled and quartered 4 cloves 2 fresh bay leaves 1 teaspoon white peppercorns 2 blades fresh mace or 1 teaspoon ground mace 2 teaspoons salt 1 ounce butter (30g) 2 tablespoons double cream (optional) or 2 tablespoons clotted cream (optional) or 2 tablespoons whipping cream (optional) 1 fresh nutmeg , for grating 1 Remove the crust from the bread and tear the stripped loaf into a mound of rough chunks or cubes about 2cm/(3/4-in) in size. You should end up with 175-200g (6 1/4-7 /4 oz) of cubes. If the bread is not slightly stale already, leave the pieces out on a wire rack to dry out. 2 Pour the milk into a saucepan. Press a clove into each quarter of the onion. 3 Add the onion quarters, bay leaves, peppercorns and the blades of mace (or sprinkle the ground mace into the pan) along with the salt and bring to the mixture almost to its boiling point. 4 Remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan with a lid and let the ingredients infuse for at least half an hour, though you can leave it for a few hours if that helps with your cooking schedule. 5 After the mixture has infused, place the pan back on a very low heat. Using a slotted spoon, remove the onions, peppercorns, cloves, bay leaves and the blades of mace. 6 Add the bread to the saucepan and cook for about 15 minutes, stirring every now and then, by which time the sauce should have become thick and warm. 7 Just before serving the bread sauce, add the butter to the saucepan and stir until the butter has melted and combined with the sauce and season, to taste, with salt. 8 Add the cream (if using). Grate over quite a bit of nutmeg, adding more once you have poured the bread sauce into a warmed bowl or gravy boat.

Source: food.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I suspect there is an, as yet, unidentified recessive gene that explains why some of us like rice. While I am selective in its preparation, I happen to love the stuff, and given my druthers, I'd have a bowl of fried rice for breakfast and pearl (rice) balls for lunch whenever I could. As a matter of fact, I've featured over 300 recipes on the blog that use rice as a major ingredient. Never satisfied, I'm adding another recipe to that category tonight. I, quite by chance, stumbled on Nigella Lawson's recipe for Lemon Risotto. It caught my eye because it was scaled to feed two people as a main course and I'm always on the lookout for recipes that can be added to my Table for Two collection. I think you'll enjoy this dish. It is creamier than most risottos and it's packed with subtle flavor. If you eat it as soon as the cream and cheese enrichments are added, you'll have an exceptional meal, but do be forewarned, if you allow the rice to sit and cool, it loses its fresh flavors and becomes goopy. I do hope you'll give this recipe a try. It is not difficult to prepare and it makes a marvelous light meal for two. Here is how the risotto is made. Nigella's Lemon Risotto ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Nigella Lawson Ingredients: 2 shallots 1 rib celery 1/4 cup unsalted butter, divided use 1 tablespoon olive oil 1-1/3 cups risotto rice, preferably Arborio Approximately 1 quart vegetable stock 1/2 unwaxed lemon, zested and juiced Needles from 2 small sprigs fresh rosemary, finely chopped 1 egg yolk 4 tablespoons grated Parmesan, plus more, for garnish 4 tablespoons heavy cream Good grating black pepper Maldon or other sea salt, to taste Directions: 1) Put shallots and celery into a mini food processor and blitz until they are finely chopped. Heat 2 tablespoons butter, oil and shallot and celery mixture in a wide saucepan, and cook to soften mixture for about 5 minutes, making sure it doesn't stick. Mix in rice, stirring to give it a good coating of oil and butter. Meanwhile, heat stock in another saucepan and keep it at simmering point. 2) Put a ladleful of stock into rice and keep stirring until stock is absorbed. Then add another ladleful and stir again. Continue doing this until rice is al dente. You may not need all of the stock, equally, you may need to add hot water from the kettle. 3) Mix lemon zest and rosemary into risotto, and in a small bowl beat egg yolk, lemon juice, Parmesan, cream and pepper. 4) When risotto is ready - when rice is no longer chalky, but still has some bite - take it off heat and add bowl of eggy, lemony mixture, and remaining butter and salt, to taste. Serve with more Parmesan if you wish, check the seasoning and dive in. Yield: 2 servings. Older Posts One Year Ago Today: Two Years Ago Today: Rum and Eggnog Quick Bread Cinnamon Pecan Wafers Three Years Ago Today: Four Years Ago Today: Yiaourtopita - Greek Lemon and Yogurt Cake Christmas Cookie Round-Up

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

#fullpost{display:inline;} When I was a senior in high school, I worked in a clothing store. (If you’re curious, it was a Laura Ashley shop. Yes, I realize this dates me.) For a part-time job it was hard to beat as my co-workers were fun and I got a clothing discount. I have to admit, however, that while creating window displays, ringing cash registers, and hanging up clothes was all well and good, the best part of the day was my lunch break. During this time, I would head to a café in the mall, grab a table, and enjoy a ham and cheese croissant. The café wasn’t fancy, but since it was away from the main food court it was a quiet spot, which was heaven to me after working with people all morning. There were also large black and white pictures of Paris hanging on the walls, which made it feel very sophisticated. As I ate my ham and cheese croissant, I would look at those pictures and dream about life after high school. Even though I still have a soft spot for ham and cheese croissants, for some reason I seldom eat them anymore. I’m not sure why. Then, the other day when researching ways to use up leftover ham, I came across Nigella Lawson’s ham and cheese croissant casserole, something she calls “French Lasagne.” It appeared to be a casserole dish made up of croissants, ham and cheese, with a savory egg custard holding everything together. Making it became my top priority. The casserole is very simple. You take day-old croissants and slice them into smaller pieces so they will fit into your preferred baking vessel. (I used a cast-iron skillet, but any two-quart baking dish will do.) You add layers of smoky ham and sharp cheese such as white cheddar and Swiss, then pour over everything an egg and milk mixture seasoned with fresh chives. When adapting recipes, my natural inclination is to throw in a lot of spices along with some chile peppers. While embellishments such as asparagus, spinach, and jalapeños would not be out of place here, I was seeking to make a ham and cheese croissant casserole that harkened back to the classic pastry I enjoyed as a teenager. With that in mind, I only added to the original egg base some mustard powder, cayenne, and herbs for a bit of piquancy and spice. I also swapped in Swiss cheese for the mozzarella called for in the original recipe instead. The end result was hearty and comforting, buttery and soft, with just enough sharp and smoky notes to keep things interesting. If you love quiche or stuffed croissants, then this is a casserole for you. While it’s not overly complicated in its pleasures, this is a large part of its charm. It’s perfect for breakfast, but with a side salad it’s works well as a lunch or supper, too. And while it’s best served warm, I’ve snacked on cold leftovers that were also satisfying. The casserole is a cinch to put together, but if you’re short on time you can prepare it the night before and then bake it in the morning, which will give your busy day a gracious beginning with little effort at all. Ham and cheese croissant casserole Ingredients: 4 or 5 croissants (12 ounces) 8 ounces chopped ham 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Swiss cheese 1 cup (4 ounces) white cheddar cheese 3 cups whole milk 4 large eggs 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh chives 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper Pinch cayenne Instructions: Cut each croissant in half lengthwise (as if you were opening it to make a sandwich) and then cut each cut half into 4 more pieces. Lightly grease a 10-inch ovenproof skillet or any other 2-quart baking dish. Lay along the bottom of the dish half of the croissants. Top the croissant layer with the ham, half of the shredded cheeses, and the chives. Top the ham and cheese layer with the remaining croissants, tearing them into additional pieces, if necessary, so they fit snugly. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Whisk together the milk, eggs, garlic, salt, pepper, mustard powder, and cayenne until well combined. Pour the eggs evenly over the casserole and then lightly press the top croissant layer into the egg mixture. Allow to rest for 20 minutes or until the bread has absorbed the egg mixture. (If you prefer, you can do this overnight. Just keep the casserole covered and refrigerated.) After it's rested, top the casserole with the rest of the cheese and bake uncovered for 40-45 minutes or until puffed and golden. (The casserole will deflate a bit as it cools). Serve warm. Yield: 6-8 servings Author: Adapted by Lisa Fain from a Nigella Lawson recipe HOMESICKTEXAN.COM PRINT RECIPE

Source: homesicktexan.blogspot.com

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