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I spend plenty of time visiting other cooking blogs and admiring the delicious-looking food. Despite that, I hardly ever actually cook recipes from other blogs. It's mostly that I rarely make a recipe the way it's written, and while I don't mind "improving" on the recipes of cookbook authors, it seems a little different to do it to a recipe from a fellow blogger. However, when Glenna from A Fridge Full of Food, posted this recipe for Vietnamese Cole Slaw , the minute I saw the recipe, I knew I'd be making it. There was very little improving to be done either; Glenna's recipe was great. She posted a healthier version of the original recipe after a Vietnamese co-worker told her that in Vietnam a salad like this would never contain oil. I loved the improved version, especially after I realized that leaving out the oil would mean you could store the dressing in the fridge for a few days. (Photo below is a slightly different version with purple cabbage; both were good.) Vietnamese Cabbage Salad with Chicken and Cilantro (Makes enough dressing for at least 4 salads, even if you like a lot of dressing like I do. Recipe originally from Nigella Lawson, adapted by A Fridge Full of Food , with a more adaptations by Kalyn.) Dressing: 3-4 drops Green Tabasco or other hot sauce (to taste, or use red or green Asian chile peppers) 1/4 tsp. garlic puree or minced garlic 2 T Splenda or sugar (use Splenda for South Beach) 2 T rice vinegar (not sweetened) 3 T fresh lime juice 2 T fish sauce. fresh ground black pepper to taste (Read here about fish sauce , which varies greatly in strength. Glenna used more, but she had a different brand than I did. I recommend adding a little and tasting until it seems good to you. Thanks to Cooking with Amy for the fish sauce link.) For each salad: (all measurements can be adjusted to taste) 1 cup diced cooked chicken or turkey 1/4 red onion, sliced into rings (or sliced green onions) 1 cup chopped green or red cabbage (next time I might use all green) 1/2 cup sliced radishes 1/4-1/2 cup chopped cilantro Mix dressing ingredients in bottle with tight-fitting lid nd shake until combined. Put diced chicken and red onion in plastic bowl and pour over a generous amount of dressing. Let marinate 15 minutes or longer. When ready to serve, combine other ingredients and pour chicken/onion/dressing mixture over, adding more dressing if desired. Serve immediately. Printer Friendly Recipe South Beach Suggestions: Made with Splenda, this salad would be perfect for any phase of The South Beach Diet. It would taste great with something like Thai Barbecue Chicken with Cilantro or Roasted Salmon with Balsamic Sauce . For phase two or three you could add something like Brown Rice with Cashews and Herbs .

Source: kalynskitchen.blogspot.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...l She appeared on the scene at a time when celebrity chefs still wore button-down "dress" whites and their cookbooks, for the most part, were formulaic "knit one, purl two" instruction manuals. This photogenic daughter of the British peerage seemingly burst out of nowhere, and, with her famous come-hither grin, convinced us that a lusty appreciation of good food was an acceptable extension of the good life. I speak, of course, of the domestic goddess, Nigella Lawson, who is being featured this week on our on-going series of women on the Gourmet Live list of 50 Women Game Changers in Food. She is a wife, mother, writer and media personality who happens to come from a distinguished and privileged background. Her father was Chancellor of the Exchequer in Margaret Thatcher's government and her mother, a great beauty, was an heiress with an impeccable background. She attended Oxford where she received a Master's degree in Medieval and Modern Languages and she went on to become the deputy editor of The Sunday Times. Her love of food led to some cross-over in her writing, and she began to write a food-column for The Spectator magazine. She married John Diamond, a broadcaster and fellow journalist while writing for the magazine, and he was instrumental in transforming her appearance and developing her public persona. Her first book, 'How to Eat: The Pleasures and Principles of Good Food', was published in 1998 and it was the springboard to her television series 'Nigella Bites.' The show was a huge success and it led to a second book and another series. In 2000, she published her 3rd book, 'How To Be A Domestic Goddess', which was voted Cookery Book of the Year' by the Guild of Food Writers the following year. While it was a period of professional success, she lost her mother, sister and husband to cancer during this time. She took a brief rest and then went on to write 'Forever Summer', 'Feast: Food that Celebrates' and 'Nigella Express'. Her books have sold over 3 million copies and she has continued to appear on television, here, and in Britain. My favorite Nigella story regards an appearance she made with the heiress Gloria Vanderbilt on an Anderson Cooper show years ago. Vanderbilt is Cooper's mother and I think it is fair to say she did not do a lot of cooking when he was a child. At any rate, she and Nigella were friends and they agreed to appear on the program to do a dry run of the Thanksgiving meal Gloria planned to make for her son. Nigella walked and talked her through stuffing and roasting a turkey and things went swimmingly, save for the fact that Anderson Cooper was so stunned to see his mother in an apron, that he had a fit of giggles he could not control. His mom just beamed. It was a gotcha smile if ever there was one. I wonder if he got the wish bone that year? While the food that Nigella Lawson prepares is very approachable, I have yet to come across a recipe that represents a culinary breakthrough. Her food is seductive and nicely done but her books are not places you will find innovation or new techniques. Her recipes are interpretations of food she has eaten and enjoyed and I am fine with that. With that in mind, I wanted to chose a recipe that I had had elsewhere and compare her version to it. I chose Liptauer cheese, a personal favorite of mind. There are many recipes for this wonderful cheese spread and while I really liked Nigella's version on bagels, I prefer my old stand-by for snacks and appetizers. There are no pitfalls in the recipe below. I hope you will give it a try. Here's Nigella's guide to making Liptauer cheese. Liptauer Cheese ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Nigella Lawson Ingredients: 18 ounces cream cheese 2-1/4 cups cottage cheese 4-5 tablespoons capers 8 cornichons, chopped 3 teaspoons paprika Pinch of salt Good grating of black pepper 2 teaspoons caraway seeds 2 teaspoons French mustard For drizzling over: 1-2 tablespoons flavorless vegetable oil Fat pinch of paprika Directions: Beat the two cheeses together until they are smooth, and then add all the other ingredients. Mix everything together well, and then turn into a small bowl with a capacity of approximately 1 quart, lined with plastic wrap for easier unmolding later. Smooth the top with a spatula and cover with the overhanging plastic wrap. Place it in the refrigerator to set. I put a couple of cans on top to press it down, but I don't feel it's crucial. I think it's because my mother was always putting pâté and suchlike in the refrigerator with weights on. When it has become cold enough to turn out — a few hours should do it — unwrap the folded-over plastic wrap on top, place a plate over the now uncovered bowl, turn it the other way out and unmold. Pull the plastic wrap off and drizzle over a rust-red ooze, made by mixing the oil with a pinch of paprika. Serve this with bread or poppy-seed-sprinkled bagels, gherkins, and, if you like, some chopped red onions. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of Nigella Lawson today. I hope you'll pay them all a visit. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed, Susan - The Spice Garden Heather - girlichef , Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Amrita - Beetles Kitchen Escapades Mary - One Perfect Bite , Sue - The View from Great Island , Barbara - Movable Feasts Linda A - There and Back Again, Nancy - Picadillo , Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen , Annie - Most Lovely Things , Jeanette - Healthy Living Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook , Alyce - More Time at the Table Kathy - Bakeaway with Me , Martha - Simple Nourished Living, Jill - Saucy Cooks Sarah - Everything in the Kitchen Sink Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Diana Kennedy . It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, April 23rd.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... There is, of course, the famous smile and the throaty laugh you'd recognize wherever you heard it, but the best identifier of all is the string of rhetorical questions that are threaded through her conversation and writing. This week, Ina Garten is the subject of our ongoing feature that highlights the lives and careers of those who made the Gourmet Live list of 50 Women Game Changers in food. That really comes as no surprise. After all, what's not to like? She is one of two children born to a mother who was an intellectual and a father who was a successful surgeon. As a child and young woman, she was kept from the kitchen and encouraged, instead, to excel in her studies. She began dating Jeffrey, her future husband, when she was 16 years old. She married him when she was 20 and followed him to Fort Bragg, North Carolina where he completed his military service. Following his discharge, they traveled to France for an extended vacation and it was here that she became seriously interested in food and cooking. On their return, they moved to Washington, D.C. where she completed an M.B.A. and worked as a budget analyst, creating nuclear energy budgets and policy papers for Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter. As a sideline, she began to flip and sell real estate and used her free time to entertain and cook for friends. The profits from her real estate ventures made it possible to buy The Barefoot Contessa, a specialty food store in Westhampton Beach, New York. She did much of the cooking herself but she employed local chefs and bakers to supplement her efforts as the business grew. The store was immediately successful and it was twice moved to larger facilities, eventually ending up in the wealthy community of East Hampton, Long Island. She sold the store in 1996 and explored other outlets for her talents. She began to write and in 1999 her first cookbook, The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook became a sleeper best seller. It was rapidly followed by Barefoot Contessa Parties! and Barefoot Contessa Family Style . She has since written four other books and combined revenue from the sales of all the books is now 6 million dollars. In 1992, she began her own series on the Food Network. It's estimated that her show draws about 1 million viewers per episode. Viewers are drawn to her quiet style and steadiness. She seems to be more approachable than Martha Stewart or Nigella Lawson whose shows target the same audience and her fan base is extremely loyal. In 2009, she was awarded an Emmy as Best Culinary Host in daytime television. She has also created a company that sells specialty foods and that line will be expanded as the market grows. Her career is amazing for a woman with no culinary training, but I suspect Ina would be successful at anything she chose to do. Who knew? There is no shortage of recipes developed by Ina Garten. I've chosen one that's super simple to prepare. I've been trying to add more appetizers and snacks to my repertoire, so I very selfishly picked a recipe that would help fill in the gaps. I have lots of fussy and time consuming starters, but I wanted something really easy to make. Her recipe for Crostini with Tuna Tapenade was perfect for my purposes. Those of you who makes this will be really pleased, though I want to caution against the use of too much lemon juice. It can be overpowering, even in a dish as strongly flavored as this. I used a single tablespoon of lemon and was quite pleased with the results. If you'd like to see Ina make this tapenade, you can find a short clip, here. Ina's recipe follows. How easy is that? Crostini with Tuna Tapenade ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Ina Garten Ingredients: 10 to 12 ounces canned or jarred Italian tuna packed in olive oil 2 teaspoons anchovy paste 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley, plus extra for garnish 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest 2 teaspoons minced garlic (2 cloves) 1 to 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 3 tablespoons good olive oil, plus extra for brushing bread 1/3 cup Italian mascarpone cheese 1/4 cup pitted and chopped kalamata olives 1 tablespoon drained capers 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 36 slices French bread, cut diagonally Directions: 1) Drain all but a tablespoon of olive oil from the tuna and then flake the fish into the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Add the anchovy paste, thyme, parsley, lemon zest, and garlic and pulse a few times. Add the lemon juice, 3 tablespoons of olive oil, and the mascarpone and process until almost smooth. Add the olives, capers, salt, and pepper and pulse just to incorporate. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 2) Meanwhile, heat a gas or charcoal grill or preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Brush the bread lightly on one side with olive oil. Grill the crostini on both sides until lightly browned or arrange the bread on a sheet pan and bake for 6 to 8 minutes. Allow to cool slightly. 3) Mound the tapenade on each toast, sprinkle with parsley, and serve. Alternatively, mound tapenadae in center of a serving plate and surround with crostini. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of Ina Garten today. I hope you'll pay them all a visit. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed, Susan - The Spice Garden Heather - girlichef , Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Amrita - Beetles Kitchen Escapades Mary - One Perfect Bite , Sue - The View from Great Island , Barbara - Movable Feasts Linda A - There and Back Again, Nancy - Picadillo , Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen , Annie - Most Lovely Things , Jeanette - Healthy Living Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook , Alyce - More Time at the Table Kathy - Bakeaway with Me Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Elena Arzak . It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, March 19th.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

1 egg 2/3 cup all-purpose flour Salt 1 cup whole milk Butter , for pie dish 1 cup grated Cheddar 2 ounces small chorizo or pepperoni slices, about 3/4-inch diameter, optional DirectionsPreheat the oven to 400 degrees F. In a small bowl, beat the egg with the flour, salt, to taste, and milk to make a smooth batter. Butter a round ovenproof pie dish, then stir half the grated cheese into the batter, before pouring it into the dish. Bake for 30 minutes. Take the dish out of the oven, sprinkle with the remaining cheese, and add the chorizo or pepperoni, if using, - or anything else - now, too. Return the dish to the oven and cook for another 2 or 3 minutes to make sure it's heated through. Once the cheese on top is melted and looks burnished fold on the crustless pizza, take it out of the oven and serve, cut into slices. A green or tomato salad on the side would not be a bad idea... Leftover Note: Leftovers can be reheated the next day in a hot oven for 8 to10 minutes, but sadly they won't be as nice as the first time around

Source: cookeatshare.com

2 1/4 lbs cocktail sausage links 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1/2 cup honey 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 Preheat the oven to 200C/400 degrees F. 2 Separate the sausages if they are linked and arrange them in a large, shallow-sided roasting tin. 3 Whisk together the oil, honey and soy sauce and pour over the sausages. 4 Mix all together. 5 Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. 6 Give them a stir about halfway through cooking.

Source: food.com

9 1/2 kg pork shoulder, skin scored 6 garlic cloves 1 cm length fresh ginger 2 fresh red chili peppers (or 1 teaspoon dried red chili pepper flakes) 3 tablespoons olive oil 4 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 The day before you plan to serve the pork, preheat your oven (make sure it's clean) to the highest heat possible. 2 Sit pork skinside up on rack in a roasting tin. 3 Chop garlic and ginger, and then pound to a paste in a pestle and mortar, add chilli or chilli flake and 1 tbsp of oil and 2 tbsp vinegar until spreadable. 4 Rub this paste all over scored skin, pushing it into the cut lines of the rind. Place pork in oven and cook 30 minutes. 5 In bowl that paste was in, pour the rest of the oil and vinegar. When pork has been in oven half an hour remove it from the oven, switch heat down to 120 degrees Celsius 6 Turn pork over (best to use oven gloves for this, though they will get dirty). Pour oil and vinegar over the underside (now the top of the pork)and put back in the low-heated oven for 23 hours. 7 About half an hour before you're ready to eat, turn oven back to the highest it will go, remove pork and turn it back crackling side up. Put it back in the oven for 30 minutes to get it hot and crisp. It may need another 10 minutes to get it really crisp. 8 Remove pork from oven, slice off the crackling and break it into pieces. Carve meat into slices and serve with crackling.

Source: food.com

12 chicken drumsticks 2 cups buttermilk 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon fresh coarse ground black pepper 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 teaspoon ground cumin 2 garlic cloves , smashed 6 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided 1 Combine all ingredients (use 4 tbsp oil) in a large ziptop bag. Refrigerate several hours or overnight. 2 Remove chicken from marinade and place in a roasting pan. Drizzle with remaining 2 tbsp oil. Roast in a preheated 425F oven for 30 minutes. Serve hot or cold.

Source: food.com

250 g dried butter beans 125 g barley 250 g parsnips (1-2 whole parsnips) 250 g carrots (2-3 whole carrots) 1 large onion (roughly chopped) 1 bunch parsley 500 g potatoes (peeled) 2 1/4 liters vegetable stock 1 tablespoon caster sugar 1 soak beans and barley overnight. skin the beans by poppin them out of their shell- nigella finds it relaxing doing this- suprisingly it is. 2 chop and process all of the peeled fresh veg or chop finley by hand inclduing parsley. add stock to large sauce pan, add the veg and beans and barley. add potaoes in small dice. 3 stir in sugar bring to boil, turn down heat and and simmer for 2 hours adding more stock or water if it gets too thick. season to taste.

Source: food.com

Cherry Coke Float Cupcakes adapted from Nigella Lawson's 'How to be a Domestic Goddess' makes 12 cupcakes Cupcakes 1 1/2 Cups flour 3/4 Cup sugar 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/4 tsp salt 1 large egg 1/2 Cup buttermilk 2 tsp vanilla 1/2 cup unsalted butter 3 Tbs cocoa powder 3/4 Cup Coca-Cola 1/4 cup marachino cherry syrup 24 marachino cherries whipped cream frosting ice-cream chocolate shell Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. 2. In a bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat the egg, buttermilk, and vanilla in a second bowl. In a saucepan, boil the Coca-Cola, and cherry syrup gently for five minutes. Melt in the butter and cocoa powder. 3. Pour into the dry ingredients, stir well with a wooden spoon, and then add the liquid ingredients, beating until everything is blended. 4. Pour into the cupcake pans and push a cherry into the center of each cupcake. Bake for 15 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean. 5. When cool frost with whipped cream. Drizzle on chocolate glaze and top with a marachino cherry.

Source: cookeatshare.com

4 zucchini (approx. 1 pounds) 5 -6 scallions , finely chopped 9 ounces feta cheese 1 small bunch fresh parsley , chopped 1 small bunch fresh mint , chopped, plus extra to sprinkle over at the end 1 tablespoon dried mint 1 teaspoon paprika 1 cup all-purpose flour salt and pepper 3 eggs , beaten olive oil , for frying 3 -4 limes 1 Coarsely grate the zucchini with either the grating blade in the food processor or by hand. Spread the little shards out on a tea towel and leave for about 20 minutes to get rid of any excess wetness. 2 Put the chopped scallions in a bowl and crumble in the feta. Stir in the chopped parsley and mint, along with the dried mint and paprika. Add the flour and season well with salt and pepper. Gradually add the beaten egg and mix thoroughly before stirring in the drained, grated zucchini. Don’t be alarmed by the unflowing straggly lumpiness of this batter; it’s meant to be this way. 3 Heat a few tablespoons of oil in a large frying pan and drop heaped dessertspoons of the mixture into the hot oil, flattening the little cakes down with the back of the spoon as you go. Cook these little patties for about 2 minutes each side until golden, and then transfer to a couple of waiting plates. 4 Chop up the limes and tumble them about the edges of the plates. Sprinkle over a little more chopped mint and eat them just as they are, spritzed with lime juice as you go.

Source: food.com

1 onion , peeled 1 celery rib 2 tablespoons garlic oil 1 teaspoon dried thyme 2 (14 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 3 1/3 cups water (use the tomato cans, you need 2 full cans) 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt , flakes or 1/2 teaspoon table salt fresh ground black pepper , to taste 1 Puree onion and celery to mush in food processor. Remove 2 tbsp of puree and set aside in a small bowl for the meatballs. 2 Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat until shimmering. (If you don't have garlic oil, saute 1 thinly sliced garlic clove in 2 tbsp oil until golden brown and very fragrant, about 3 minutes; remove and discard garlic before proceeding.) Reduce to medium-low, add vegetable puree and thyme, and cook, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. 3 Add tomatoes, water, sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a gentle boil, then reduce to a simmer and let cook while prepping the meatballs. 4 Add all meatball ingredients to reserved vegetable puree. Mix gently to combine; avoid over-mixing to prevent the meatballs from being leaden and heavy. 5 Form mixture into approximately 50 meatballs (each should be about one heaping teaspoon). Once all the meatballs are formed, add them to the simmering sauce. Continue to simmer 30 minutes, or until the meatballs are cooked through.

Source: food.com

1 day-old loaf unsliced white bread, crust removed and broken into 3/4-inch cubes 2 pints whole milk (1 liter) 1 onion , peeled and quartered 4 cloves 2 fresh bay leaves 1 teaspoon white peppercorns 2 blades fresh mace or 1 teaspoon ground mace 2 teaspoons salt 1 ounce butter (30g) 2 tablespoons double cream (optional) or 2 tablespoons clotted cream (optional) or 2 tablespoons whipping cream (optional) 1 fresh nutmeg , for grating 1 Remove the crust from the bread and tear the stripped loaf into a mound of rough chunks or cubes about 2cm/(3/4-in) in size. You should end up with 175-200g (6 1/4-7 /4 oz) of cubes. If the bread is not slightly stale already, leave the pieces out on a wire rack to dry out. 2 Pour the milk into a saucepan. Press a clove into each quarter of the onion. 3 Add the onion quarters, bay leaves, peppercorns and the blades of mace (or sprinkle the ground mace into the pan) along with the salt and bring to the mixture almost to its boiling point. 4 Remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan with a lid and let the ingredients infuse for at least half an hour, though you can leave it for a few hours if that helps with your cooking schedule. 5 After the mixture has infused, place the pan back on a very low heat. Using a slotted spoon, remove the onions, peppercorns, cloves, bay leaves and the blades of mace. 6 Add the bread to the saucepan and cook for about 15 minutes, stirring every now and then, by which time the sauce should have become thick and warm. 7 Just before serving the bread sauce, add the butter to the saucepan and stir until the butter has melted and combined with the sauce and season, to taste, with salt. 8 Add the cream (if using). Grate over quite a bit of nutmeg, adding more once you have poured the bread sauce into a warmed bowl or gravy boat.

Source: food.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I suspect there is an, as yet, unidentified recessive gene that explains why some of us like rice. While I am selective in its preparation, I happen to love the stuff, and given my druthers, I'd have a bowl of fried rice for breakfast and pearl (rice) balls for lunch whenever I could. As a matter of fact, I've featured over 300 recipes on the blog that use rice as a major ingredient. Never satisfied, I'm adding another recipe to that category tonight. I, quite by chance, stumbled on Nigella Lawson's recipe for Lemon Risotto. It caught my eye because it was scaled to feed two people as a main course and I'm always on the lookout for recipes that can be added to my Table for Two collection. I think you'll enjoy this dish. It is creamier than most risottos and it's packed with subtle flavor. If you eat it as soon as the cream and cheese enrichments are added, you'll have an exceptional meal, but do be forewarned, if you allow the rice to sit and cool, it loses its fresh flavors and becomes goopy. I do hope you'll give this recipe a try. It is not difficult to prepare and it makes a marvelous light meal for two. Here is how the risotto is made. Nigella's Lemon Risotto ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Nigella Lawson Ingredients: 2 shallots 1 rib celery 1/4 cup unsalted butter, divided use 1 tablespoon olive oil 1-1/3 cups risotto rice, preferably Arborio Approximately 1 quart vegetable stock 1/2 unwaxed lemon, zested and juiced Needles from 2 small sprigs fresh rosemary, finely chopped 1 egg yolk 4 tablespoons grated Parmesan, plus more, for garnish 4 tablespoons heavy cream Good grating black pepper Maldon or other sea salt, to taste Directions: 1) Put shallots and celery into a mini food processor and blitz until they are finely chopped. Heat 2 tablespoons butter, oil and shallot and celery mixture in a wide saucepan, and cook to soften mixture for about 5 minutes, making sure it doesn't stick. Mix in rice, stirring to give it a good coating of oil and butter. Meanwhile, heat stock in another saucepan and keep it at simmering point. 2) Put a ladleful of stock into rice and keep stirring until stock is absorbed. Then add another ladleful and stir again. Continue doing this until rice is al dente. You may not need all of the stock, equally, you may need to add hot water from the kettle. 3) Mix lemon zest and rosemary into risotto, and in a small bowl beat egg yolk, lemon juice, Parmesan, cream and pepper. 4) When risotto is ready - when rice is no longer chalky, but still has some bite - take it off heat and add bowl of eggy, lemony mixture, and remaining butter and salt, to taste. Serve with more Parmesan if you wish, check the seasoning and dive in. Yield: 2 servings. Older Posts One Year Ago Today: Two Years Ago Today: Rum and Eggnog Quick Bread Cinnamon Pecan Wafers Three Years Ago Today: Four Years Ago Today: Yiaourtopita - Greek Lemon and Yogurt Cake Christmas Cookie Round-Up

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

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