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From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...l She appeared on the scene at a time when celebrity chefs still wore button-down "dress" whites and their cookbooks, for the most part, were formulaic "knit one, purl two" instruction manuals. This photogenic daughter of the British peerage seemingly burst out of nowhere, and, with her famous come-hither grin, convinced us that a lusty appreciation of good food was an acceptable extension of the good life. I speak, of course, of the domestic goddess, Nigella Lawson, who is being featured this week on our on-going series of women on the Gourmet Live list of 50 Women Game Changers in Food. She is a wife, mother, writer and media personality who happens to come from a distinguished and privileged background. Her father was Chancellor of the Exchequer in Margaret Thatcher's government and her mother, a great beauty, was an heiress with an impeccable background. She attended Oxford where she received a Master's degree in Medieval and Modern Languages and she went on to become the deputy editor of The Sunday Times. Her love of food led to some cross-over in her writing, and she began to write a food-column for The Spectator magazine. She married John Diamond, a broadcaster and fellow journalist while writing for the magazine, and he was instrumental in transforming her appearance and developing her public persona. Her first book, 'How to Eat: The Pleasures and Principles of Good Food', was published in 1998 and it was the springboard to her television series 'Nigella Bites.' The show was a huge success and it led to a second book and another series. In 2000, she published her 3rd book, 'How To Be A Domestic Goddess', which was voted Cookery Book of the Year' by the Guild of Food Writers the following year. While it was a period of professional success, she lost her mother, sister and husband to cancer during this time. She took a brief rest and then went on to write 'Forever Summer', 'Feast: Food that Celebrates' and 'Nigella Express'. Her books have sold over 3 million copies and she has continued to appear on television, here, and in Britain. My favorite Nigella story regards an appearance she made with the heiress Gloria Vanderbilt on an Anderson Cooper show years ago. Vanderbilt is Cooper's mother and I think it is fair to say she did not do a lot of cooking when he was a child. At any rate, she and Nigella were friends and they agreed to appear on the program to do a dry run of the Thanksgiving meal Gloria planned to make for her son. Nigella walked and talked her through stuffing and roasting a turkey and things went swimmingly, save for the fact that Anderson Cooper was so stunned to see his mother in an apron, that he had a fit of giggles he could not control. His mom just beamed. It was a gotcha smile if ever there was one. I wonder if he got the wish bone that year? While the food that Nigella Lawson prepares is very approachable, I have yet to come across a recipe that represents a culinary breakthrough. Her food is seductive and nicely done but her books are not places you will find innovation or new techniques. Her recipes are interpretations of food she has eaten and enjoyed and I am fine with that. With that in mind, I wanted to chose a recipe that I had had elsewhere and compare her version to it. I chose Liptauer cheese, a personal favorite of mind. There are many recipes for this wonderful cheese spread and while I really liked Nigella's version on bagels, I prefer my old stand-by for snacks and appetizers. There are no pitfalls in the recipe below. I hope you will give it a try. Here's Nigella's guide to making Liptauer cheese. Liptauer Cheese ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Nigella Lawson Ingredients: 18 ounces cream cheese 2-1/4 cups cottage cheese 4-5 tablespoons capers 8 cornichons, chopped 3 teaspoons paprika Pinch of salt Good grating of black pepper 2 teaspoons caraway seeds 2 teaspoons French mustard For drizzling over: 1-2 tablespoons flavorless vegetable oil Fat pinch of paprika Directions: Beat the two cheeses together until they are smooth, and then add all the other ingredients. Mix everything together well, and then turn into a small bowl with a capacity of approximately 1 quart, lined with plastic wrap for easier unmolding later. Smooth the top with a spatula and cover with the overhanging plastic wrap. Place it in the refrigerator to set. I put a couple of cans on top to press it down, but I don't feel it's crucial. I think it's because my mother was always putting pâté and suchlike in the refrigerator with weights on. When it has become cold enough to turn out — a few hours should do it — unwrap the folded-over plastic wrap on top, place a plate over the now uncovered bowl, turn it the other way out and unmold. Pull the plastic wrap off and drizzle over a rust-red ooze, made by mixing the oil with a pinch of paprika. Serve this with bread or poppy-seed-sprinkled bagels, gherkins, and, if you like, some chopped red onions. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of Nigella Lawson today. I hope you'll pay them all a visit. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed, Susan - The Spice Garden Heather - girlichef , Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Amrita - Beetles Kitchen Escapades Mary - One Perfect Bite , Sue - The View from Great Island , Barbara - Movable Feasts Linda A - There and Back Again, Nancy - Picadillo , Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen , Annie - Most Lovely Things , Jeanette - Healthy Living Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook , Alyce - More Time at the Table Kathy - Bakeaway with Me , Martha - Simple Nourished Living, Jill - Saucy Cooks Sarah - Everything in the Kitchen Sink Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Diana Kennedy . It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, April 23rd.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

From the Kitchen of One Perfect Bite... A gastropub is a bar and restaurant that serves high-end beer and food without pretension. Who knew? Certainly not me. I had no idea what a gastropub was until I started looking for information about April Bloomfield. It turns out that she is a Michelin star chef who would have become a police officer had she not missed the application deadline for the academy in her hometown of Birmingham, England. By default, she followed in the footsteps of her sisters who were working in restaurant kitchens. Following graduation from the Birmingham College of Food, Tourism and Creative Studies, she continued her training in some very prestigious kitchens that included Kensington Place, Bibendum, Roscoff and the legendary River Cafe. She came to the United States and worked in the kitchen of Chez Panisse with Alice Waters before opening her own restaurant, a small and casual gastropub, called The Spotted Pig, in New York City. The restaurant features seasonal British and Italian food designed to highlight the simple beauty of fine ingredients. Portion control and elegant or fussy presentations are left to others. The Spotted Pig won a Michelin star in 2005 when April Bloomfield was just 31 years old. She and her partner, Ken Friedman, have since opened two other restaurants, the Breslin and the now defunct John Dory Oyster Bar. She has also written her first cookbook, A Girl and Her Pig , which is a collection of her best recipes complete with backstories that also reveal bits about her life and cooking philosophy. I found a wonderful link to a New Yorker feature about her that's very insightful and well worth reading. Take a peak if you can. She has accomplished a lot for a woman not yet 40 and she has earned her place on the Gourmet Live list of 50 Women Game Changers in Food. The recipe I've chosen to highlight the food created and served by April Bloomfield is a brunch entree that is served at the Breslin. This is an outstanding way to begin the day. Each element of the dish, and there are three, is delicious in its own right, but when they are brought together culinary magic occurs. The pancakes are large enough to please Paul Bunyon, though I suggest you serve them hot from the griddle. They are light when warm but tend to become heavy and damp as they cool. The ricotta cheese is the perfect creamy topper for them. My favorite element of the three is the orange syrup which is spectacular. I was struck by the balance and restraint of this lovely citrus syrup and I will use it often for other dishes that I cook. This, coincidentally, makes a wonderful topping for those who do not use alcohol in their cooking. I hope that you will try this lovely entree. Here's the recipe. The Breslin Ricotta Pancakes with Orange Syrup ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of April Bloomfield Ingredients: Orange Syrup 1 orange 1 cup fresh orange juice 1 cup sugar 1 cup water Ricotta Topping 1-1/2 cups fresh ricotta 1-1/2 tablespoons sugar 3/4 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest Seeds scraped from 1/2 vanilla bean Pancakes 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 cup fine white cornmeal 2 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 2 cups buttermilk 2 large eggs, separated 1/2 cup fresh ricotta Vegetable oil, for frying Toasted almond slices, for serving Directions: 1) To make syrup: Peel zest from the orange in long strips and julienne. In a saucepan of boiling water, blanch zest for 30 seconds. Drain and repeat. In a saucepan, simmer orange juice, sugar, water and blanched zest until syrupy, about 10 minutes. Let cool. 2) To make ricotta topping: Mix ricotta, sugar, lemon zest and vanilla seeds in a bowl. 3) To make pancakes: Whisk whisk flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt, baking powder and soda in a large bowl. In another large bowl, whisk buttermilk, egg yolks and ricotta. Fold wet ingredients into dry ingredients. In a large, clean stainless steel bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff but not dry; fold them into the batter. 4) To cook: In a large cast-iron skillet, heat a thin film of vegetable oil. Drop in 1/4-cup dollops of batter and cook over moderately high heat, 2 minutes per side, until golden and fluffy. Serve about 3 pancakes per person. Pass the orange syrup, ricotta topping and toasted almonds at the table. Yield: 4 servings. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of April Bloomfield today. I hope you'll pay them all a visit. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed, Susan - The Spice Garden Heather - girlichef , Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Amrita - Beetles Kitchen Escapades Mary - One Perfect Bite , Sue - The View from Great Island , Barbara - Movable Feasts Linda A - There and Back Again, Nancy - Picadillo , Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen , Annie - Most Lovely Things , Jeanette - Healthy Living Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook , Alyce - More Time at the Table Kathy - Bakeaway with Me , Martha - Simple Nourished Living, Jill - Saucy Cooks Sara - Everything in the Kitchen Sink Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Nigella Lawson . It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, April 16th.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

125 g soft butter 125 g caster sugar 125 g self raising flour 2 eggs 1/2 teaspoon real vanilla extract 2 tablespoons milk 1 Nigella offers a very important tip to take everything you need out of the fridge in time to get to room temperature. This will give a lightness to the cupcakes later - and preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. 2 For those on a schedule, put all of the ingredients for the cupcakes except for the milk into a food processor and blitz until smooth. Pulse while adding the milk down the funnel, to make a smooth dropping consistency. 3 Or if you're a bit more old fashioned using a bowl and wooden spoon, cream the butter and sugar, beat in the eggs one at a time with a little of the flour. Then add the vanilla extract and fold in the rest of the flour, adding the milk to get the dropping consistency as before. 4 Divide the mixture between a 12-bun muffin tin lined with muffin papers, and bake in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes. They should have risen and be golden on top. Let them cool a little in their tins on a rack, and then take them carefully out of the tin to cool in their papers, still on the wire rack. 5 Ice with Royal Icing. 6 Royal Icing: *2 large egg whites (or substitute powdered egg whites, 3 cups confectioners' sugar(known to Australians as icing sugar. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 7 Combine the egg whites and confectioners' sugar in a medium-size mixing bowl and whip with an electric mixer on medium speed until opaque and shiny, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the lemon juice, this will thin out the icing. Beat for another couple of minutes until you reach the right spreading consistency for the cupcakes. 8 MUST use self rising flour. Substituting all purpose will result in cakes that do not rise, as no other levening agents are used in this recipe.

Source: food.com

9 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 pinch caster sugar 1 bunch mint 1 1/2 kg peas , in pod (approx. 500g podded weight) assorted salad leaves 2 heads chicory lettuce 3 ripe avocados 1 First make the dressing: put the oil and vinegar and a pinch of sugar into a large bowl and then put in a decent handful of chopped mint. 2 Stir well so all is amalgamated. 3 Cook the podded peas for a short time in salted boiling water, just so they are ready, but not soft. 4 Taste after 2 minutes and then keep tasting. 5 Pour peas in colander and then straight away into the bowl of dressing and let steep for an hour or up to a day. 6 Just before serving, stir in about a packetful of mixed salad, the chicory which has been separated into it leaves and the avocado, which should be cut into bite size chunky slices. 7 You may need to drizzle a bit more oil after tossing. 8 serve this on a big plate. 9 Sprinkle with more mint.

Source: food.com

2 1/4 lbs cocktail sausage links 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1/2 cup honey 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 Preheat the oven to 200C/400 degrees F. 2 Separate the sausages if they are linked and arrange them in a large, shallow-sided roasting tin. 3 Whisk together the oil, honey and soy sauce and pour over the sausages. 4 Mix all together. 5 Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. 6 Give them a stir about halfway through cooking.

Source: food.com

175 g dried udon noodles 750 ml chicken stock or 750 ml vegetable stock or 750 ml dashi stock 1 teaspoon soft dark brown sugar 1 star anise 1 teaspoon grated gingerroot 2 tablespoons soy sauce 75 g bean sprouts 75 g sugar snap peas 75 g sliced shiitake mushrooms 2 baby pak choi , finely sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh coriander , to serve 1 Cook the noodles according to packet instructions, then drain and divide between two serving bowls. 2 Meanwhile, bring the stock, sugar, star anise, ginger and soy sauce to the boil in a saucepan. 3 Add the vegetables and simmer for two minutes, or until just tender. 4 To serve, pour the vegetable mixture over the noodles in each bowl and sprinkle with coriander.

Source: food.com

250 g dried butter beans 125 g barley 250 g parsnips (1-2 whole parsnips) 250 g carrots (2-3 whole carrots) 1 large onion (roughly chopped) 1 bunch parsley 500 g potatoes (peeled) 2 1/4 liters vegetable stock 1 tablespoon caster sugar 1 soak beans and barley overnight. skin the beans by poppin them out of their shell- nigella finds it relaxing doing this- suprisingly it is. 2 chop and process all of the peeled fresh veg or chop finley by hand inclduing parsley. add stock to large sauce pan, add the veg and beans and barley. add potaoes in small dice. 3 stir in sugar bring to boil, turn down heat and and simmer for 2 hours adding more stock or water if it gets too thick. season to taste.

Source: food.com

1 onion , peeled 1 celery rib 2 tablespoons garlic oil 1 teaspoon dried thyme 2 (14 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 3 1/3 cups water (use the tomato cans, you need 2 full cans) 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt , flakes or 1/2 teaspoon table salt fresh ground black pepper , to taste 1 Puree onion and celery to mush in food processor. Remove 2 tbsp of puree and set aside in a small bowl for the meatballs. 2 Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat until shimmering. (If you don't have garlic oil, saute 1 thinly sliced garlic clove in 2 tbsp oil until golden brown and very fragrant, about 3 minutes; remove and discard garlic before proceeding.) Reduce to medium-low, add vegetable puree and thyme, and cook, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. 3 Add tomatoes, water, sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a gentle boil, then reduce to a simmer and let cook while prepping the meatballs. 4 Add all meatball ingredients to reserved vegetable puree. Mix gently to combine; avoid over-mixing to prevent the meatballs from being leaden and heavy. 5 Form mixture into approximately 50 meatballs (each should be about one heaping teaspoon). Once all the meatballs are formed, add them to the simmering sauce. Continue to simmer 30 minutes, or until the meatballs are cooked through.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons sake 1/4 cup mirin 1/4 cup soy sauce 2 tablespoons light brown sugar 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil 1 3/4 lbs boneless skinless chicken thighs , cut in bite-sized pieces 3/4 lb rice noodles 1 teaspoon peanut oil 1/2 lb sugar snap pea 1 In a non-reactive dish, stir together sake, mirin, soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger and sesame oil. Add chicken pieces, toss, cover with plastic, and refrigerate for 30 minutes. 2 Add noodles to salted boiling water and cook until done (they should be fully soft, not al dente like Italian pasta). 3 While noodles cook, heat peanut oil in wok or large skillet over medium flame. Remove chicken from marinade and stir-fry for 3-4 minutes. Add marinade, cover and simmer 10 minutes. 4 Add sugar snap peas to noodles. 5 Transfer chicken pieces to a large piece of foil and fold to seal inches Turn up flame under sauce until it thickens to a glaze. Add chicken back to pan (with any accumulated juices) and toss to coat. 6 Drain noodles and peas, and transfer to a serving dish. Pour chicken over the top.

Source: food.com

1 day-old loaf unsliced white bread, crust removed and broken into 3/4-inch cubes 2 pints whole milk (1 liter) 1 onion , peeled and quartered 4 cloves 2 fresh bay leaves 1 teaspoon white peppercorns 2 blades fresh mace or 1 teaspoon ground mace 2 teaspoons salt 1 ounce butter (30g) 2 tablespoons double cream (optional) or 2 tablespoons clotted cream (optional) or 2 tablespoons whipping cream (optional) 1 fresh nutmeg , for grating 1 Remove the crust from the bread and tear the stripped loaf into a mound of rough chunks or cubes about 2cm/(3/4-in) in size. You should end up with 175-200g (6 1/4-7 /4 oz) of cubes. If the bread is not slightly stale already, leave the pieces out on a wire rack to dry out. 2 Pour the milk into a saucepan. Press a clove into each quarter of the onion. 3 Add the onion quarters, bay leaves, peppercorns and the blades of mace (or sprinkle the ground mace into the pan) along with the salt and bring to the mixture almost to its boiling point. 4 Remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan with a lid and let the ingredients infuse for at least half an hour, though you can leave it for a few hours if that helps with your cooking schedule. 5 After the mixture has infused, place the pan back on a very low heat. Using a slotted spoon, remove the onions, peppercorns, cloves, bay leaves and the blades of mace. 6 Add the bread to the saucepan and cook for about 15 minutes, stirring every now and then, by which time the sauce should have become thick and warm. 7 Just before serving the bread sauce, add the butter to the saucepan and stir until the butter has melted and combined with the sauce and season, to taste, with salt. 8 Add the cream (if using). Grate over quite a bit of nutmeg, adding more once you have poured the bread sauce into a warmed bowl or gravy boat.

Source: food.com

1 onion , peeled, halved and thinly sliced into half-moons 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground coriander 2 cloves 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds 4 dried curry leaves (optional) 2 teaspoons salt fresh ground black pepper 1 cup green lentil (french green is suggested) 1 cup basmati rice 1 In a large heavy-based saucepan, heat over medium heat. 2 Add onion slices, and sauté until softened and deep golden brown. 3 Remove half the onions and set aside. 4 Reduce heat to medium-low and add turmeric, cumin, coriander, cloves, mustard seeds and curry leaves. 5 Add salt, and season with black pepper to taste. 6 Combine lentils and rice in a fine-meshed sieve, and rinse well with cold water. 7 Drain, then add to pan. 8 Add 4 cups water, raise heat, and bring to a boil. 9 Cover, reduce heat to very low, and cook for 15 to 20 minutes. 10 Water should be completely absorbed; if not, remove pan from heat, remove lid and cover pan with a kitchen towel, then replace lid and allow to stand for 10 minutes. 11 To serve, fluff pilaf with a fork, and transfer to a serving bowl. 12 Garnish with reserved onions.

Source: food.com

1 1/2 cups cold mashed potatoes 1 (14 ounce) can salmon (organic preferred) 1 tablespoon unsalted butter , melted, if potatoe does not have enough, plus extra unsalted butter , for frying 1 pinch cayenne 1/2 lemon, zest of , grated salt and pepper 1/2 cup matzo meal 2 eggs 1 In large bowl mix together all fish ingredients with hands. 2 Cover sheet with plastic wrap. 3 Plunge hands back into mixture and form fat palm size patties. 4 Place on sheet. 5 Put in fridge for 20 min to 1hr. 6 Coating mix: In shallow bowl beat 2 eggs. 7 Dip fish in egg then in 1/2 cup Matzo meal. 8 coat well. 9 Melt butter and a bit of oil and fry till golden brown. 10 About 4-6 min each side.

Source: food.com

#fullpost{display:inline;} When I was a senior in high school, I worked in a clothing store. (If you’re curious, it was a Laura Ashley shop. Yes, I realize this dates me.) For a part-time job it was hard to beat as my co-workers were fun and I got a clothing discount. I have to admit, however, that while creating window displays, ringing cash registers, and hanging up clothes was all well and good, the best part of the day was my lunch break. During this time, I would head to a café in the mall, grab a table, and enjoy a ham and cheese croissant. The café wasn’t fancy, but since it was away from the main food court it was a quiet spot, which was heaven to me after working with people all morning. There were also large black and white pictures of Paris hanging on the walls, which made it feel very sophisticated. As I ate my ham and cheese croissant, I would look at those pictures and dream about life after high school. Even though I still have a soft spot for ham and cheese croissants, for some reason I seldom eat them anymore. I’m not sure why. Then, the other day when researching ways to use up leftover ham, I came across Nigella Lawson’s ham and cheese croissant casserole, something she calls “French Lasagne.” It appeared to be a casserole dish made up of croissants, ham and cheese, with a savory egg custard holding everything together. Making it became my top priority. The casserole is very simple. You take day-old croissants and slice them into smaller pieces so they will fit into your preferred baking vessel. (I used a cast-iron skillet, but any two-quart baking dish will do.) You add layers of smoky ham and sharp cheese such as white cheddar and Swiss, then pour over everything an egg and milk mixture seasoned with fresh chives. When adapting recipes, my natural inclination is to throw in a lot of spices along with some chile peppers. While embellishments such as asparagus, spinach, and jalapeños would not be out of place here, I was seeking to make a ham and cheese croissant casserole that harkened back to the classic pastry I enjoyed as a teenager. With that in mind, I only added to the original egg base some mustard powder, cayenne, and herbs for a bit of piquancy and spice. I also swapped in Swiss cheese for the mozzarella called for in the original recipe instead. The end result was hearty and comforting, buttery and soft, with just enough sharp and smoky notes to keep things interesting. If you love quiche or stuffed croissants, then this is a casserole for you. While it’s not overly complicated in its pleasures, this is a large part of its charm. It’s perfect for breakfast, but with a side salad it’s works well as a lunch or supper, too. And while it’s best served warm, I’ve snacked on cold leftovers that were also satisfying. The casserole is a cinch to put together, but if you’re short on time you can prepare it the night before and then bake it in the morning, which will give your busy day a gracious beginning with little effort at all. Ham and cheese croissant casserole Ingredients: 4 or 5 croissants (12 ounces) 8 ounces chopped ham 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Swiss cheese 1 cup (4 ounces) white cheddar cheese 3 cups whole milk 4 large eggs 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh chives 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper Pinch cayenne Instructions: Cut each croissant in half lengthwise (as if you were opening it to make a sandwich) and then cut each cut half into 4 more pieces. Lightly grease a 10-inch ovenproof skillet or any other 2-quart baking dish. Lay along the bottom of the dish half of the croissants. Top the croissant layer with the ham, half of the shredded cheeses, and the chives. Top the ham and cheese layer with the remaining croissants, tearing them into additional pieces, if necessary, so they fit snugly. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Whisk together the milk, eggs, garlic, salt, pepper, mustard powder, and cayenne until well combined. Pour the eggs evenly over the casserole and then lightly press the top croissant layer into the egg mixture. Allow to rest for 20 minutes or until the bread has absorbed the egg mixture. (If you prefer, you can do this overnight. Just keep the casserole covered and refrigerated.) After it's rested, top the casserole with the rest of the cheese and bake uncovered for 40-45 minutes or until puffed and golden. (The casserole will deflate a bit as it cools). Serve warm. Yield: 6-8 servings Author: Adapted by Lisa Fain from a Nigella Lawson recipe HOMESICKTEXAN.COM PRINT RECIPE

Source: homesicktexan.blogspot.com

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