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Quiche is, as Thomas Keller called it, “the sexiest pie.” Photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman. I’ve been in LA on an entertainment project and to see the opening of my friend and collaborator Richard LaGravenese ‘s new movie Beautiful Creatures . I’d never been to an opening before. But quiche has been on my mind, so I’ve been using travel time to work on some variations of this infinitely variable fat custard tart. If I had time I’d head to Bouchon in Beverly Hills , which makes perfect quiche. Bouchon, and working on that book , is where I learned that, while America was taught to make quiche in premade pie shells, this deprives the quiche of its true greatness: depth. In order to achieve that voluptuous texture, it has be about two inches thick. For this, you need to have a ring. When I told this to my partner in tools, Mac Dalton , he said, I can make that! I said great. And so we did. The recipe here is for my favorite quiche, simply bacon and onion enriched with delicious cheese. I made it for Kai Ryssdal when he interviewed me about my book Ratio . Because I found myself writing about quiche on the CLE-to-LAX flight, I thought I’d post on it here, this simple but extraordinary creation, what Thomas Keller described as “the sexiest pie.” I couldn’t agree more. Trimming the crust off the quiche ring. Quiche Lorraine For the crust: 12 ounces flour 8 ounces butter (or lard, shortening, or any combination thereof), cut into small pieces, cold or even frozen 2 to 4 ounces ice water (quantity depends on the fat—whole butter has water in it so you need only a couple ounces; shortening and lard do not contain water) three-finger pinch of salt (about 1/2 teaspoon) For the quiche: 2 large Spanish onions, thinly sliced canola oil as needed 1 3-2-1 savory pie dough (see recipe above) 1 pound slab bacon cut into 1/4-inch lardons* 2 cups milk 1 cup cream 6 eggs 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper nutmeg to taste (about 5 gratings) 1/2 cup grated Comté or Emmentaler cheese To make the crust: Combine the flour and fat in a mixing bowl and rub the fat between your fingers until you have small beads of fat and plenty of pea-sized chunks. (If you’re making a bigger batch, this can be done in a standing mixer with a paddle attachment, but remember not to paddle too much after you add the water, just enough so that it comes together.) Add the ice water gradually and a good pinch of salt, and mix gently, just until combined—if you work the dough too hard it will become tough. Shape into two equal discs and refrigerate for 15 minutes or until ready to roll. To make the quiche: Sauté the onions over medium heat in a few tablespoons of canola oil. You might cover them for the first 15 minutes to get them steaming and releasing their moisture, then uncover, reduce the heat to medium low, and continue cooking them until they are cooked down but not overly brown, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Set them aside when they’re finished. Preheat your oven to 350°F/177°C. Roll out the dough to a thickness of about 1/4 inch. Place a 2-x-9-inch ring mold or a 9-inch cake pan on a baking sheet (line the baking sheet with parchment if you’re using a ring mold; if you’re using a cake pan, line its bottom with parchment). Lightly oil the inside of your ring mold. Lay the dough into the mold—there should be plenty of dough overhanging the edges to help it maintain its shape. Reserve a small piece of dough to fill any cracks that might open in the dough as it bakes. Line the dough with parchment or foil and fill it with dried beans or pie weights so that the crust bakes flat. After a half hour, remove the weights and parchment or foil. Gently patch any cracks that may have formed with the reserved dough, and continue baking until the bottom of the crust is golden and cooked, about 15 more minutes. Remove it from the oven and patch any cracks that may have opened; this is especially important if you’re using a ring mold, or the batter will leak out. The shell should be anywhere between cold and warm when you add the batter, not piping hot from the oven. Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F/163°C. Sauté the bacon gently until it’s cooked as you like it (crisp on the outside, tender on the inside is best!). Drain the bacon and combine it with the onions. In a six- or eight-cup liquid measuring cup, combine the milk, cream, eggs, salt, pepper, and nutmeg and, using a hand blender, blend until frothy. This can be done in a standing blender as well (though depending on the size of your blender, you may need to do it in batches). Or you could even mix the batter in a large bowl using a whisk—beat the eggs first, then add the rest of the ingredients. The idea is to add the ingredients in two layers, using the froth to help keep the ingredients suspended. Layer half of the onion-bacon mixture into the shell. Pour half of the frothy custard over the mixture. Sprinkle with half of the cheese. Layer with the remaining onion-bacon mixture. Refroth the batter and pour the rest into the shell. Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top. You may want to put the tray with the quiche shell into the oven and pour the remaining batter into it there so that you can get every bit of batter into the shell. You can even let it overflow to make sure it’s up to the very top. Bake for about an hour and a half, or until the center is just set (it may take as long as two hours, but don’t overcook it—there should still be some jiggle in the center). Allow the quiche to cool, then refrigerate it until it’s completely chilled, at least 8 hours or up to 3 days. Using a sharp knife, cut the top of the crust off along the rim. Slide the knife along the edge of the ring mold or cake pan to remove the quiche. Slice and serve cold or, to serve hot, slice and reheat for 10 minutes in a 375°F/190°C oven on lightly oiled parchment or foil. * Lardons are batons of bacon and can be as thick as 1/2-inch square. Smaller lardons are best here, but a pound of thick-cut bacon sliced into strips is also acceptable. This is the quiche “money shot”. Other links you may like: My post on making your own English Muffins . Learn about the history of quiche lorraine. Another great treat: try baking your own cinnamon bread . © 2013 Michael Ruhlman. Photo © 2013 Donna Turner Ruhlman. All rights reserved .

Source: ruhlman.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I bought lamb chops for our holiday dinner, but because I was unsure of the number I'd be feeding, I ended up with more chops than guests at the table. I decided to grill the remainder of the chops tonight. Those we had for the holiday were delicious and I wanted to serve these with something that would compliment, rather than overpower, their marvelous flavor. I decided to make an endive and watercress salad and a very cheesy orzo pilaf. I can attribute the salad to Thomas Keller, but identifying the parentage of the orzo is next to impossible. Rachael Ray did a version of this recipe at least five years ago and since that time it has appeared in various guises on numerous cooking sites. I lack the wisdom of Solomon and have no easy test to establish paternity, so I'm just going to move along and pretend the orzo is a new version of rice pilaf. It is very easy to do and can be on the table in 15 minutes. Chances are you have all the ingredients you need to make this in your pantry, and, if not, they can all be found in any large grocery store. It is a perfect dish to serve with grilled meat or poultry and I know you'll enjoy it. Here's the recipe. Cheesy Orzo Pilaf ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite Ingredients: 3 cups low-sodium chicken broth 3/4 pound orzo 5 minced garlic cloves 1 cup grated Parmesan-Reggiano cheese 2 tablespoons finely minced parsley salt to taste freshly ground pepper to taste Directions: 1) Bring broth to a boil in a large heavy saucepan. Add orzo and garlic and reduce heat to medium high. Simmer, uncovered, for about 7-8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the pasta is tender, and broth is nearly absorbed. 2) Turn heat off, but leave the pan on stove. Add cheese and parsley and mix well. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve warm. Yield: 6 servings. You might also enjoy these recipes: Yangzhou Fried Rice - One Perfect Bite Warm Asian-Style Rice Salad - One Perfect Bite Sticky Rice - One Perfect Bite

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

1/4 teaspoon curry powder 1 cinnamon stick (1-inch) 1 clove 1/2 lemon, zest of , cut into 2 two inch strips 1/2 orange, zest of , cut into 2 two inch strips 8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup shallot , minced 1 cup tomato , peeled, seeded, finely chopped 1/2 cup red wine 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons orange juice 3 cups eggplants , finely diced 1 1/2 cups zucchini , finely diced 1 1/2 cups yellow squash, finely diced 3 tablespoons butter , unsalted, cut into small pieces (optional) 1/4 cup roasted sweet peppers , finely diced 1/4 cup roasted yellow pepper, finely diced 1 teaspoon parsley , chopped kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper 1 In a small skillet, combine curry powder, cinnamon stick and clove and place over medium heat, toasting until aromatic; removed from the heat and wrap the spices in cheesecloth with the lemon and orange zest and tie the cheesecloth to make a sachet. 2 In a medium saucepan, combine 2 tablespoons of olive oil and the shallots and saute over low heat until the shallots have softened--about 4 minutes. 3 Add the tomatoes, red wine, sugar, lemon and orange juices, and the sachet. 4 Simmer until the liquid has reduced and the mixture resembles a marmalade--about 20 to 25 minutes. 5 Remove from heat and discard sachet. 6 In a large skillet over medium heat, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil and then add the eggplant and saute until tender--about 5 minutes. 7 Drain eggplant on paper towels set on a rack. 8 Return the skillet to the medium heat, add two more tablespoons of oil and, when the oil is warm, add the zucchini and yellow squash and saute that until tender--4 to 5 minutes. 9 Drain the zucchini and squash. 10 Note: Dish can be prepared in advance to here and chilled for several hours; if it is chilled, bring to room temperature before proceeding. 11 Reheat the tomato mixture and whisk in the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. 12 Add butter, one piece at a time, whisking to emulsify the sauce. (this step can be omitted to "veganize" the recipe). 13 Add the eggplant, zucchini and yellow squash. 14 Fold in red and yellow peppers and parsley. 15 Serve warm. 16 If served as a base for skate (as at The French Laundry), this serves six; as a condiment or as part of an appetizer plate, it will serve more--the yield is roughly 6 cups.

Source: food.com

Given the number of scone recipes on this blog, you might be fooled into thinking I'm a huge fan. Not true. Don't get me wrong, I like scones, but if you put out a spread of breakfast pastries before me, scones probably wouldn't be a top three selection. That is, unless these cinnamon honey scones were somewhere on that table. I try to refrain from the hyperbole of labeling recipes the "best ever" but sometimes it just can't be helped and such is the case with these scones. Hands down my favorite scones of all time, no doubt about it! The recipe comes from Thomas Keller's Bouchon Bakery , and though I've had the book since Christmas and even flipped through it a few times, I'd never noticed these scones. Luckily Josie put them on my radar a few months ago and I resolved to make them asap. So, what makes these scones so awesome? Butter, and lots of it, of course :) A cinnamon honey butter is made and then cut into tiny cubes which are incorporated into the dough like any other mix-in (think chocolate chips). It's a genius idea, I want to add tiny butter cubes as mix-ins in all my recipes going forward! They give the scones so much flavor, as well as a really neat marbled appearance. Texturally, the scones are impossibly light and tender, thanks to the inclusion of cake flour in the recipe. And in case they weren't already rich enough on their own, the scones are brushed with a honey butter glaze when they emerge from the oven. They're an occasional indulgence for sure, but worth every single calorie! These cinnamon honey scones would be a perfect weekend project. Though they're easy to make, there are quite a few steps and several require hours of chill time. But once they're assembled you can leave them in the freezer for up to a month, allowing you to pull out and bake a few scones at a time as needed. That's my kind of weekend breakfast! One quick note: this recipe calls for creme fraiche, an ingredient I rarely buy or use but I do recommend splurging for it here. That said, I know there's nothing worse than a half-empty container of creme fraiche sitting in the back of your fridge, so I found another recipe to help you use it up. I'll be sharing it with you next week! Cinnamon Honey Scones just barely adapted from Bouchon Bakery by Thomas Keller and Sebastien Rouxel (originally seen on Pink Parsley ) {Note: The recipes in this book are given in both weight and volume measurements. I made the scones using the weight measurements and would urge you to do the same for the best results.} Cinnamon Honey Cubes 30 g (3 tablespoons) all-purpose flour 30 g (2 1/2 tablespoons) sugar 4 g (1 1/2 teaspoons) ground cinnamon 30 g (about 2 tablespoons) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch pieces 20 g (1 tablespoon) honey Scones 152 g (1 cup + 1 1/2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour 304 g (2 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) cake flour 12.5 g (2 1/2 teaspoons) baking powder 2.5 g (1/2 teaspoons) baking soda 91 g (1/4 cup + 3 1/2 tablespoons) sugar 227 g (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch pieces 135 g (1/2 cup + 1 1/2 tablespoons) heavy cream 135 g (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) creme fraiche Honey Butter Glaze 2 oz (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted 20 g (1 tablespoon) honey To make the cinnamon honey cubes: Add the flour, sugar, and cinnamon to a medium bowl and whisk to combine. Add the butter and toss until the pieces are coated in the dry ingredients. Use a pastry cutter to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until no large visible pieces of butter remain. Stir in the honey with a rubber spatula until the mixture forms a smooth paste. Turn the paste out onto a piece of plastic wrap and shape into a 4-inch square. Wrap the mixture and freeze for at least 2 hours (or up to 1 week). To make the scones: Sift both flours, the baking powder, baking soda, and sugar into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on low speed briefly, just until combined. Add the butter pieces, and mix on low speed until no large visible pieces remain, about 3 minutes. With the mixer on low, gradually pour in the heavy cream, then add the creme fraiche, and continue mixing for about 30 seconds, or until the dry ingredients are evenly moistened. A rough dough should form around the paddle. Remove the cinnamon honey butter from the freezer and cut into 1/4-inch pieces. Add them to the bowl with the dough and use a spoon to incorporate them by hand (it's fine if they start to break up a bit). Turn the dough onto a large piece of plastic wrap and press it together to form a cohesive mass. Place a second piece of plastic wrap on top, and shape the dough into a 7 1/2 by 10-inch rectangle, smoothing the top and sides the best you can (if the dough becomes soft and difficult to work with, just pop it in the fridge for a few minutes). Wrap the dough in the plastic wrap, and refrigerate for about 2 hours, or until firm. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and using a sharp knife, cut it lengthwise into thirds and crosswise into quarters so you end up with 12 equally sized scones. Transfer them to the prepared baking sheet, leaving 1/2 to 1-inch of space between them. Cover the baking sheet with plastic wrap and freeze the scones until they are frozen solid - at least 2 hours, but even better if you can leave them in there overnight (the scones can be frozen for up to 1 month at this point). Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Transfer the scones you want to bake from the freezer to the prepared baking sheet, leaving about 1 inch of space between them. Bake for about 28-30 minutes, or until the scones are golden brown and slightly firm. Meanwhile, make the glaze by whisking the butter and honey together until combined. When you remove the scones from the oven, immediately brush the tops with the glaze. The scones are best the day you make them, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 day. Makes 12 large scones

Source: traceysculinaryadventures.blogspot.com

4 lbs boneless pork shoulder , cut into 8 pieces and trimmed of excess fat salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 cup panko 4 ounces bacon , thick cut, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips 4 cups yellow onions , coarsely chopped (about 3 medium onions) 2 cups sauvignon blanc wine or 2 cups other dry white wine 1/4 cup tomato paste 1 (35 ounce) can Italian plum tomatoes , peeled and drained and coarsely chopped 2 cups chicken broth 12 cups great northern beans , fully cooked and drained 6 chorizo sausage , fully cooked or smoked about 1 1/2 lb. total, each halved on the diagonal 1 head of garlic , halved crosswise 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley , chopped, plus more for garnish 1 lb baguette , cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices olive oil , extra virgin, for brushing coarse sea salt , such as sel gris, for garnish 1 Directions:. 2 Season the pork generously with kosher salt and pepper; set aside. 3 In the stovetop-safe insert of a slow cooker over medium-high heat, combine the canola oil and panko. Cook, stirring constantly, until the panko is toasted and golden, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer the panko to a baking sheet and season with kosher salt and pepper. 4 Add the bacon to the insert and cook until crisp on both sides, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Reserve the bacon fat in the insert. 5 Add half of the pork to the insert and brown on all sides, 7 to 8 minutes total. Transfer to a platter. Repeat with the remaining pork. 6 Add the onions and 1 teaspoons kosher salt to the insert and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and softened, about 7 minutes. Add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, about 8 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, tomatoes and broth. Remove the insert from the heat and add the beans, pork, chorizo and garlic. 7 Place the insert on the slow-cooker base, cover and cook on low until the pork pulls apart easily with a fork, 9 to 10 hours. Skim off the fat, and remove and discard the garlic. Fold in the panko and the 1/4 cup parsley. Adjust the seasonings with kosher salt and pepper. 8 Position a rack in the lower third of an oven and preheat the broiler. 9 Brush the baguette slices with olive oil. Arrange the slices, oiled side up, on top of the cassoulet, overlapping them. Broil until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. 10 Let the cassoulet stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes before serving. Sprinkle each serving with the reserved bacon, sea salt and parsley. Serves 8 to 10. 11 Adapted from a recipe by Thomas Keller, Chef/Owner, The French Laundry.

Source: food.com

We made it guys, day 5 of Blueberry Week! I've had so much fun putting together this week's posts; hopefully you've discovered some new ideas that have you excited about using your summer bounty. Oh, and I really hope you're not sick of blueberries yet. There were a few recipes that didn't make this week's cut that I'll be sharing later this summer. Today I thought we'd go classic with blueberry muffins, and just in time for you to enjoy them for breakfast this weekend! These aren't just any old blueberry muffins, though, they're from Thomas Keller's Bouchon Bakery cookbook, and they are pretty darn fantastic. When Shane and I were in Vegas a few years ago we stopped by Bouchon Bakery for cupcakes, cookies and croissants, but didn't try the muffins, and judging by the results of this recipe, I now realize that was a big mistake. There are several things that make these some of the best blueberry muffins I've ever had. First, after the batter is made, it is refrigerated at least overnight. This allows the flour to absorb the liquid and results in a seriously moist and tender muffin. And while the rest period might seem like a pain, it's actually kind of perfect because it means you can roll out of bed on Sunday morning, pour the batter into the pan and have freshly baked muffins in no time! The muffins are absolutely packed with blueberries and have the most unique flavor thanks to the inclusion of a little molasses. It not only gives the muffins a darker, more caramel color, but adds that little something that really takes the flavor to the next level. Of course we can't forget about the streusel topping - who doesn't love a streusel topping?? Mine looks kind of sad and lacking, but only because I was gun-shy and didn't top each muffin with enough before baking. Don't be like me, load that streusel topping on! It'll seem like SO much, but some will melt into the muffins and you'll be glad you didn't skimp. Even with the small amount on each of mine, the flavor came through and the slightly crunchy texture was a great complement to the tender muffin. If you don't already have a copy of the Bouchon Bakery cookbook, I can't recommend it highly enough! I've tried a handful of recipes and each one has been better than the last. Totally worthy of a spot on your bookshelf :) Bouchon Bakery Blueberry Muffins slightly adapted from Bouchon Bakery by Thomas Keller and Sebastien Rouxel {Note: The recipes in this book are given in both weight and volume measurements. I made the muffins using the weight measurements and would urge you to do the same for the best results. Also, the recipe makes way more streusel than you'll need - either freeze the rest for another batch of muffins, or scale the recipe back to make only a third of it.} Almond Streusel 120 g (3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour 120 g (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon) almond flour/meal 120 g (1/2 cup plus 1 1/2 tablespoons) granulated sugar 0.6 g (1/4 teaspoon) kosher salt 120 g (4.2 oz, just over 8 tablespoons) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch pieces Muffins 180 g (3/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons) frozen wild blueberries 96 g (1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided 109 g (3/4 cup plus 1 1/2 tablespoons) cake flour 2.8 g (1/2 plus 1/8 teaspoon) baking powder 2.8 g (1/2 plus 1/8 teaspoon) baking soda 2.4 g (3/4 teaspoon) salt 96 g (3.4 oz, about 7 tablespoons) unsalted butter, at room temperature 96 g (1/2 cup) granulated sugar 40 g (2 tablespoons) molasses 54 g (2 1/2 tablespoons) honey 72 g (1/4 cup plus 1 1/2 teaspoons) eggs 1.2 g (1/4 teaspoon) vanilla extract 57 g (1/4 cup) buttermilk To make the streusel: Whisk the all-purpose flour, almond flour, sugar, and salt together in a medium bowl. Add the butter and toss to coat with the dry ingredients, then cut it into them using a pastry cutter until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before using. The streusel can be made ahead - refrigerate for up to 2 days, or freeze for up to 1 month. To make the muffins: In a small bowl, toss the frozen blueberries and 10 g (1 tablespoon) of the flour until the blueberries are coated. Place the bowl in your freezer. Add the remaining 86 g of flour to a medium bowl. Sift the cake flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into the bowl and whisk to combine. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter on medium-low speed until it has a mayonnaise-like consistency. Mix in the sugar on medium-low speed until the butter-sugar mixture is fluffy. Add the molasses and honey, beating until well combined, and scraping down the bottom and sides of the bowl as necessary. Mix in the eggs and vanilla until just incorporated. Alternately add the dry ingredients and buttermilk in 2 additions each, beginning with the dry ingredients and finishing with the buttermilk. Give the batter a final stir with a rubber spatula to ensure everything is combined, then cover the bowl and refrigerate at least overnight, or up to 36 hours. When you're ready to bake, preheat oven to 425 F. Line muffin pan with paper liners. Take the muffin batter from the refrigerator and allow to sit at room temperature for about 10 minutes so it'll soften slightly. Grab the blueberries from the freezer, and add them to the batter, folding to incorporate. Divide the batter evenly among the prepared liners, filling each about 2/3 to 3/4 full. Top each muffin with about 2 tablespoons of the streusel. Transfer the muffins to the oven, and immediately lower the oven temperature to 325 F. Bake for about 32 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer the pan to a wire rack and allow the muffins to cool for about 5-10 minutes, then remove them to the rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for 2-3 days. Makes about 14 muffins

Source: traceysculinaryadventures.blogspot.com

Last month, I finally fulfilled my long-time dream of traveling to New York City. Talk about a foodie's paradise! I got to eat at Bar Boulud, Cafe Boulud, Eataly, and Schnipper's Deli, all of which were absolutely fantastic. But, if you've been following my blog, you know I'm all about the sweets. And from hearing what other people have said about NYC, that meant it was time to go hunt down those chocolate chip cookies, namely Jacques Torres, Levain Bakery, and Thomas Keller. To my disappointment, however, I found out that Levain Bakery's famous chocolate chip cookie is made with walnuts (I'm allergic) and they don't make a nut-free version. My mom who came with me, on the other hand, has no such problem, and she gladly devoured the cookie we bought from there and proclaimed it the best out of the three places above. She then went back into the bakery and promptly bought five more to take home. Ha! Cookie from Levain Bakery Well, this just wouldn't do. The "best" cookie in NYC and I can't even taste it for myself? Oh no! So, I had no choice but to hunt down a copycat recipe and make them myself, this time with no walnuts. I came across this recipe on the blog, Parsley Sage & Sweet . Since a lot of other bloggers commented on how close this one was to the real thing, I figured I couldn't go wrong. The only thing I changed was to add 1 1/2 tsp. of vanilla. Whether that made the cookie taste less Levain-esque, I don't know, but I simply have to have vanilla in my chocolate chip cookies. I then followed a couple of recommendations on her blog and added 1 Tbsp. cornstarch and also froze the large cookie dough balls before baking them. The result? I got ooey, gooey centers in my cookies surrounded by a lovely crispy shell. Then, there was all that chocolatey goodness melting in the middle. Oooohhh! I can't even describe how good that was. My sister, who sampled one of the actual Levain cookies my mom brought back, took a taste too. Unfortunately, she couldn't for the life of her remember what the original one tasted like, so she couldn't say whether or not this one came close. And, since I hadn't tasted it either, I guess we'll never know. But, what I do know was that these cookies tasted awesome! My sister also loved the thick, chewy texture of the cookies. She then proceeded to take a lot of them home with her to eat later on. This one is truly a keeper! Levain Bakery Copycat Chocolate Chip Cookies (adapted from Parsley Sage & Sweet ) 1 c. 'cold and cubed' unsalted butter ( I used salted ) 3/4 c. sugar 3/4 c. brown sugar 2 eggs 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla ( I added this ) 3 1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 3/4 tsp. kosher salt ( I omitted this ) 3/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. baking soda 1 c. semisweet chocolate chips 1 c. milk chocolate chips Cream the butter and sugars until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs and vanilla. Stir in the flour, cornstarch, salt (if using), baking powder, and baking soda until combined. Mix in the chocolate chips. Form into large balls, about 4 oz. each. ( I did about three of my cookies like this and made the rest of them into small, regular-sized cookies ). Freeze the dough balls for at least 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350F. Bake the large cookie dough balls for 15-20 minutes ( mine took 23 minutes ). Bake the smaller, regular-sized dough balls for 12 minutes .

Source: sweet-as-sugar-cookies.blogspot.com



Here was the deal: my favorite roast chicken recipe is this one from Thomas Keller. (Sidebar: I’m currently in San Francisco and last night I ate at Zuni, and as I was leaving the bathroom who did I lock eyes with? Thomas Keller. Turns out he goes to the bathroom too; food gods are just like us!) The problem, though, is that the Thomas Keller roast chicken with root vegetables is an event. It requires that you use your roasting pan; it involves a shopping-cart full of turnips, rutabaga, carrots, onions, and potatoes. It’s not really practical for a weeknight. As for my usual weeknight roast chicken, I’d normally wind up putting the chicken in my All-Clad metal skillet so that I could make a sauce in there afterwards (see here), roasting the vegetables separately. That was OK. Then I remembered my trusty friend the cast iron skillet. What if I did the Keller thing in there? What happened next will astound you (how’s that for an UpWorthy paragraph ender?).

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Source: amateurgourmet.com



Let us all acknowledge the truth about roast chicken: it’s not about the chicken, it’s about the vegetables. That truth dawned on me long ago when I used to line a roasting pan with red potatoes sliced in half, all surrounding a well-seasoned chicken; the rendered chicken fat would coat the potatoes, they’d get all crispy, and when it was time to eat, the actual roast chicken was an afterthought. It only got better when I discovered Thomas Keller’s roast chicken: in with the potatoes went leeks, carrots, parsnips, rutabaga, turnips, and suddenly next to that pretty little bird would be vegetables as beautiful as the crown jewels. Now imagine turning those salty, schmaltzy vegetables into soup, a soup that takes about 5 minutes.

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Source: amateurgourmet.com

Reposting this method because, well, just the name of the dish is inspiring: butter-poached shrimp. Butter-poached shrimp and grits. Mmmm. Butter-poached lobster, not uncommon in French haute cuisine, was popularized in America by Thomas Keller in The French Laundry Cookbook and at that restaurant. “Lobster loves gentle heat,” he told me then. It’s not much of a leap for the thrifty-minded cook to reason that shrimp, too, love gentle heat. That’s why, in the butter chapter of my book Ruhlman’s Twenty, I showed how to use butter as a cooking medium (one of the many amazing ways butter can be used as a tool). This dish is absolutely killer. The shrimp stay very tender, rich and tasty with the butter; the grits are then enriched with the shrimp butter. Leftover butter can be used to saute shrimp Read On »

Source: ruhlman.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I came across this recipe years ago. We had been gifted with gorgeous grassfed steaks and I wanted a simple salad to accompany them. I let my fingers do the walking, and while searching I came across The Paupered Chef, a blog that has since become inactive. They were featuring a salad and dressing that was included in Thomas Keller's book Bouchon . With a pedigree like that, I knew my steaks would be in good company, so the salad and dressing became part of our meal. With just 3 ingredients, the dressing is the epitome of simplicity, though I must admit I mix it up a bit and use 2 parts canola oil to 1 part extra virgin olive oil to add some additional flavor. You'll notice that the dressing has no salt, sugar or herbs added to it. That's because Keller adds them to his salads rather than their dressing. This is a creamy sauce that flows easily and coats a spoon. It is not thick, and for that reason it is important to add only a third of the oil to the blender. Adding more at that time would turn the emulsion into a thick mayonnaise that cannot be poured. It's thought that Keller uses canola oil because it is bland and does not interfere with other flavors. I think most of you will enjoy the freshness of this dressing, but do remember it is unseasoned and you are expected to season the greens before tossing the salad. Do give this a try. It will keep for 2-1/2 weeks in the refrigerator, and should it separate, simply give it another whirl in the blender. Here is how the dressing and Keller's Bibb lettuce salad are made. Basic Vinaigrette Ingredients: 1/4 cup Dijon mustard 1/2 cup red wine vinegar 1-1/2 cups canola oil Directions: 1) Combine mustard and vinegar in a blender and blend at medium for 15 seconds to combine. With blender running, add 1/2 cup oil in a slow stream, making sure to add it slowly enough to develop a creamy emulsion. 2) Transfer mixture to a bowl and whisk in the remaining oil. Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. Yield: 2-1/2 cups salad dressing. Bibb Lettuce Salad Ingredients: 1/2 cup Basic vinaigrette 4 heads Bibb lettuce, or enough lettuce for 4 of another type such as red leaf 2 tablespoons minced shallots 2 tablespoons minced chives 1/4 cup parsley leaves 1/4 cup tarragon leaves 1/4 cup chervil leaves (optional) 1 tablespoon lemon juice salt and pepper to taste Directions: 1) Carefully core each lettuce head and loosen leaves but keep structure of head intact, as it will be reassembled on the plate. If using a leaf lettuce, tear leaves into small pieces. Plunge lettuce into cold water to clean it, then gently spin in a salad spinner until very dry. 2) Transfer lettuce to a large mixing bowl and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Scatter herbs and shallot and drizzle vinaigrette and lemon juice over everything. Toss it gently by hand to dress, and serve. Yield: 4 servings. Older Posts One Year Ago Today: Two Years Ago Today: Cornmeal Cookies Swedish Raspberry and Almond Bars Three Years Ago Today: Four Years Ago Today: Strawberry and Pineapple Jam Picnic Pasta Salad

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

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