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This one is my favorite, a warm dish that full of comforting food ^ ^. Each spoonful, you will find delicious mashed potato with the sweet sautéed onion and the cheese. I love soft food (well, I told you before, hehe, that I love baby food), so I can't wait to try anything like this. Anyway this is my second time for this dish, I love the creaminess of the mashed potato that goes very well with the cheese. You can serve this dish as a main (which is very good for me), with a bowl of soup, it will be your ultimate comfort menu. Even the name of the dish says pie, I just have to say that , it's a baked mashed potato with onion and cheese (it's longer, but easier to understand, right?) When mashing the potato, I use the hand mixer (this method is from Delia Smith and I stuck to this way ever since) it's easier, quicker and smoother, you can use this method when making the simple mash too (but if you like your mashed potato to be a bit chunky, it's not for you, ^ ^). This dish can be prepared ahead of time, and when you want to serve just place the tomato and sprinkle the cheese on top and put it in the oven and bake until it's golden brown. Easy and delicious food is not hard to make, well, now I can say this, haha. Cheese, Onion and Potato Pie * serves two generously (I must say, you have to be very very hungry to finish it, haha, I serve 4) takes about 45 minutes to make 750g .................................. potatoes, peeled and quartered 40g .................................... butter 1 ......................................... large onion, thinly sliced 100ml ................................ milk 200g .................................. mature Cheddar, Double Gloucester or Red Leicester cheese, grated 50g .................................... Mozzarella cheese, grated 1 teaspoon ........................ wholegrain or English mustard ............................................ sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 1-2 ..................................... tomatoes, sliced Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Cook the potatoes in boiling salted water for 15 to 20 minutes until tender. Drain the potatoes and return back to the pan. Mash really well with a potato masher ( dailydelicious note: I use hand mixer, which is very quick and efficient ). While the potatoes are cooking, melt the butter in a pan and gently saute the onion until lightly golden and sweet. This will take about 10 minutes. Add the milk to the pan and heat until almost boiling. Then beat the milk and onion, three-quarters of the cheddar cheese, the mustard and some seasoning into the mashed potato. Transfer to a buttered ovenproof dish, lay the tomato slices on top and scatter over the remaining cheddar and mozzarella cheese. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the top is bubbling and lightly golden. Cheese, Onion and Potato Pie: Ultimate comforting dish!

Source: dailydelicious.blogspot.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... She is as prolific as Martha Stewart and her voice is heard bell-clear in Britain. I speak, of course, of Delia Smith who is this week's honoree on our journey through Gourmet Live's list of 50 Women Game Changers in Food . She may lack the passion of Elizabeth David, and lead a life that seems almost bland by comparison, but in Britain this plain spoken woman is a force to contend with. Why? I quote now from a profile written about her in The Independent . "Is there anyone who appears duller than Delia Smith? Maybe not; but I would suspect that there are millions of people who are precisely as dull as her: us." Now in her 70's, Delia Smith was born to a working class family and, by her own admission, was just a middling student whose young life was marked by a lack of appreciation. She had no formal training in cooking and, as it turns out, her skill was honed because she wanted to be seen in a more favorable light by a man she had fallen in love with. When that didn't work out, she resolved to become a cook. She arrived in London in 1960 and while working at a travel agency, had dinner in a restaurant called The Singing Chef. She was captivated by the food and soon became a dish-washer at the restaurant. She, by degrees, moved up the restaurant hierarchy and went on to become an assistant at food photo shoots. Her reputation was made when she was able to quickly replace a pie that had been dropped just before a shoot was to began. Word got around and people started to listen to her safe, dependable and basic instructions. She became interested in trying to revive an interest in British food. In 1969, she met Deborah Owen, a newly married literary agent who she taught basic cooking techniques. That acquaintance lead to a job at the Daily Mirror and her career has been on an upward trajectory ever since. Many find her food to be ordinary and her handling of ingredients to be passionless. Yet there she is, larger than life. Her fans, obviously, outnumber her critics. She is Britain's bestselling cookbook writer and the 23 books she has written have sold over 21 million copies worldwide. She has often said she is not a cook. That's probably true, but that overlooks her influence as an arbiter of British eating habits and the way her country cooks. The food world is chock full of saints and sinners who have captured the imagination of the public for reasons that are not always clear. A large segment of Britain heard Delia Smith's voice and responded to it. She has had their ear ever since. Bubble and squeak is a traditional English dish that is usually made with leftover potatoes and cabbage. The vegetables are fried in a pan until they are well-cooked and brown on both sides. The name comes from the bubble and squeak sounds they make as they cook. This recipe uses fresh vegetables and them cooks them rosti-style. Rosti potatoes are a Swiss dish that is a cross panfried and potato pancakes. Delia's recipe calls for the use of spring greens. Spring greens are actually young, tender cabbage plants that are sold as loose heads of thick green leaves. They do not have the hard core which is found in the middle of fully-grown cabbages. I have never seen them, so I used green the cabbage leaves she suggested as a substitute. This is a nice dish. Mine did not brown in the oven, so I finished them in a skillet before serving. Here is Delia Smith's recipe. Bubble and Squeak Rösti ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Delia Smith Ingredients: 1 pound boiling potatoes (about 3 evenly sized potatoes weighing about 5-oz. each) 3 ounces spring greens or green cabbage (trimmed weight) 2 ounces mature Cheddar, coarsely grated 1 level tablespoon plain flour 1 ounce butter 1 dessert spoon olive oil salt and freshly milled black pepper Directions: 1) First scrub the potatoes, then place them in a medium saucepan with a little salt. Pour boiling water over to just cover them, then simmer gently with a lid on for 8 minutes. Drain the potatoes, then, while they are cooling, remove any stalks from the spring greens or cabbage and finely shred the leaves into 1/4-inch slices. This is easy if you form them into a roll and then slice them. Drop the spring greens or cabbage into boiling water for 2 minutes only, then drain and dry well. 2) When the potatoes have cooled, peel them, then, using the coarse side of a grater, grate them into a bowl. Season with salt and freshly milled black pepper, then add the grated cheese and greens or cabbage and, using 2 forks, lightly toss together. 3) To assemble the rösti, shape the mixture into rounds 3 inches wide and 1/2-inch thick. Press them firmly together to form little cakes and dust lightly with the flour. If you want to make them ahead, place them on a plate and cover with clingfilm – they will happily sit in the fridge for up to 6 hours. 4) To cook the rösti, pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees F., placing the baking tray on the top shelf of the oven. Melt the butter and add the oil, then brush the rösti on both sides with the mixture. When the oven is up to heat, place the rösti on the baking tray and return it to the top shelf of the oven for 15 minutes, then turn the rösti over and cook them for a further 10 minutes. Once cooked, it's all right to keep them warm for up to 30 minutes. Yield: 8 rösti. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of Delia Smith today. I hope you'll pay them all a visit. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed, Susan - The Spice Garden , Heather - girlichef , Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Jeanette - Healthy Living Mary - One Perfect Bite , Kathleen - Bake Away with Me, Sue - The View from Great Island Barbara - Movable Feasts , Linda A - There and Back Again, Nancy - Picadillo Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits, Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen Annie - Most Lovely Things , Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook , Alyce - More Time at the Table , Amrita - Beetles Kitchen Escapades Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Edna Lewis. It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, February 20th.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... Fasten your seat belts folks,'cause you're in for a bumpy ride. Today we are exploring the work and influence of Ella Brennan, a restaurateur who holds position 34 on the Gourmet Live list of Women Game Changers in food . She is a fascinating woman whose zest for life, devotion to family and studied knowledge of the restaurant business has given her legendary status in the culinary world. She is off-beat, edgy and a bit eccentric, one of those rare individuals who add a splash of vibrant red to a world that is too often gray. To know her, you must understand where she came from and a bit about her family. She was born in the Irish Channel, a neighborhood in New Orleans, to a family of three boys and three girls. Her father was a handsome raconteur and her mother, a gifted cook, loved to entertain. It was, however, her brother Owen who drew her to the restaurant world. While she was in high school, he bought a restaurant in the French Quarter called the Vieux Carre. Apparently, even as a young woman, she had an intuitive sense of the business, and she was unrelenting in her criticism of his venture. It was a bit more than the classic thrust and parry of siblings. He challenged her to improve what she saw. She accepted. Though she was still in high school, she ended up doing whatever he didn't like to do. That included the hiring and training of staff, menu planning, bookkeeping and inventory control. She was keenly aware of her inexperience, so she turned to books to learn each skill she needed to operate the restaurant. Then she turned to people she thought might have something more to teach her. She spent hours talking to diners, food and wine merchants and the kitchen staff. By the time she was 18, she was running the place and it became an enterprise that employed the entire family, save for her gentile mother, who refused to work in the French Quarter. The hours were long and arduous and she never, at any point in her career, stopped working. Today, she is the matriarch of a New Orleans family that operates a dozen restaurants, including the Commander's Palace, her baby. Though she is retired, she lives next door to the restaurant which is now run by her daughter, Ti. Word on the street says she finds it hard to stay away and visits the kitchen several times aweek. We are told she is still irreverent, wildly entertaining and has retained the curious mix of elegance and earthiness that has always been her hallmark. She remains a serious student of all that interests her. Ruth Reich credits her with defining a new type of restaurant that is distinctly American and celebrates the regional food of this country. She is credited with pioneering the notion of nouvelle Creole cuisine, elevating the profile of Louisiana cooking throughout the world and in doing so earning for herself a place in the culinary history of the nation. Ella Brennan is a fascinating woman who has rubbed elbows with princes and paupers and trained chefs who changed the way America eats. If you'd like to know more about this unconventional woman and her family, you'll find a quick and insightful read, here . Now comes the tricky part. By her own admission Ella Brennan, who has a golden palate, "can't cook worth a lick" and drolly suggests, "I never took to the kitchen." That means that those of us who want to feature recipes that highlight the food for which she is famous have to scratch like hens in dirt to find them. When I saw this one, I knew I'd have to give it a try. I don't know a lot about this type of dish, so if I misrepresent it in any way, please forgive my ignorance. I served these catfish morsels as finger food on game day. I suppose they could be served as an entree, but I was concerned that that a meal-size portion would be too high in calories to be acceptable to many of you. These are very nice, but when I make them again I'll use half the mustard called for in the recipe. I found it to be too intense in flavor for my palate and will use mayonnaise to replace some of it next time around. This is a nice recipe and I know that those of you who try it will enjoy the catfish fingers. The dipping sauce, actually a tomato remoulade, is really, really good and would also be wonderful with chicken fingers or used to dress a salad. Here is Ella's recipe. Catfish Fingers with Tomato Tartar Sauce ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Ella Brennan via La Belle Cuisine Ingredients: Tomato Tartar Sauce 1 cup puréed peeled and seeded fresh tomato (or the same amount of canned) 1 cup dry white wine 1/2 cup tomato juice 1 teaspoon minced garlic 2-1/2 cups mayonnaise 1/4 cup minced white onion 1/4 cup drained sweet pickle relish 1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon 1/2 teaspoon Louisiana Hot Sauce 1/2 teaspoon salt Whites of 2 hard-cooked eggs, minced Catfish Fingers 1-1/2 pounds catfish fillets 3 tablespoons Creole mustard 2 tablespoons dry white wine 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper Peanut oil for frying 1 cup yellow cornmeal 1/2 cup corn flour 1/3 cup cornstarch 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning Directions: 1) Combine tomato purée, wine, tomato juice, and garlic in a small sauce-pan and bring quickly to a boil, stirring, over high heat. Turn the heat down to a simmer and reduce the mixture to 1 cup without stirring, about 20 to 25 minutes. Allow to cool. Add cooled tomato reduction to mayonnaise, onion, and relish in a food processor. Purée mixture and scrape it out into a bowl. Mix in all other ingredients, correct seasoning if necessary, and chill. Makes about 3 cups. 2) Cut catfish into 1/2-by-2-inch strips. Combine mustard, wine, salt and pepper. Add catfish strips and toss to coat well. Cover and marinate for an hour. 3) Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees F. Mix together cornmeal, corn flour, cornstarch and Creole seasoning. Spread out on a sheet of waxed paper. Roll marinated strips in mixture, lightly shaking off any excess. Fry until golden, about 4 minutes. Drain on paper towels and serve with Tomato Tartar Sauce. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of Ella Brennan today. I hope you'll pay them all a visit. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed, Susan - The Spice Garden , Heather - girlichef , Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Jeanette - Healthy Living Mary - One Perfect Bite , Kathleen - Bake Away with Me, Sue - The View from Great Island Barbara - Movable Feasts , Linda A - There and Back Again, Nancy - Picadillo Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits, Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen Annie - Most Lovely Things , Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook , Alyce - More Time at the Table , Amrita - Beetles Kitchen Escapades Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Delia Smith. It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, February 13th.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

I was talking to my father about my mother the other day and I remembered something she used to do when my brother and I were little: every time she made a cake she would let us lick the bowl, which was something we both enjoyed very much (I might have told you that already but I’m not sure – 936 posts will do that do one’s mind). :) She was a fabulous baker and baked very often, not only because she loved it but also because she wanted my father and I to have something tasty in our lunch boxes. Licking the bowl is a sport I still practice – in fact, I’ll gladly try most doughs and batters before actually baking them. What I did not expect was that this habit would actually save me a great amount of stress after a baking session: Sunday morning and I set out to make muffins. I chose Delia Smith’s marmalade muffins because I love anything marmalade and wanted to give that beautiful book a try. The batter was ready in no time and soon the muffins were in the oven. While they baked, I started making the bed and all of a sudden it hit me: I hadn’t added any sugar to the batter!!! O_O I ran back to the kitchen, grabbed the recipe and read it again – no, there was no sugar in it. It wasn’t my mistake. Then I remembered how good the batter tasted and felt instantly relieved: the marmalade alone would be enough to sweeten the muffins. Phew. These muffins are not too sweet – obviously :) – and the marmalade topping make them even tastier. I’m a sucker for marmalade but I believe these could work with other preserves, too – apricot comes to mind, or maybe raspberry paired with lemon zest. Marmalade muffins slightly adapted from the master Delia Smith (mine was bought here ) 225g chunky orange marmalade 1 cup + 1 tablespoon (150g) all purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of salt finely grated zest and juice of 1 large orange whole milk, if necessary 1 heaping tablespoon almond meal 1 large egg ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 50g unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled To finish the muffins: 2 heaping tablespoons orange marmalade Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F. Line a 1/3-cup capacity muffin pan with 9 paper liners and fill the remaining cavities halfway up with water. Place the marmalade in a small bowl and give it a good stir to loosen it up. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Zest and juice the orange, then measure the juice – you’ll need ½ cup (120ml); if you don’t have enough juice, make it up with some milk. In a small bowl, whisk together the zest and juice (and milk, if using), almond meal, egg, vanilla and melted butter. Pour these ingredients into the flour mixture and lightly whisk with a fork – do not overmix or your muffins will be tough. Fold in the marmalade. Divide the batter between the muffin liners and bake for 18-20 minutes or until risen and golden and a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan over a wire rack for 5 minutes, then carefully unmold onto the rack and cool. You can serve these muffins warm or at room temperature – before serving, spread the extra marmalade on top of each muffin. Makes 9

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

8 ounces celery ribs 1 1/2 ounces Stilton cheese 2 tablespoons low-fat creme fraiche 2 tablespoons breadcrumbs 1 tablespoon butter , melted celery salt 1 Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 2 Lightly butter a small gratin dish. 3 Put a pot that can fit a steamer basket on to boil (you can also use an electric steamer for this step later on if you prefer). 4 Start off by trimming the celery stalks and cutting them into 3 to 5 inch lengths so they fit snugly into the gratin dish. 5 Peel them to get rid of any stringy bits. 6 Put them into the steamer basket or in an electric steamer and steam for 7 minutes. 7 Arrange the celery over the base of the gratin dish and add some seasoning. 8 Crumble the Stilton all over the celery, tucking it into any gaps as well. 9 Spoon the creme fraiche over the celery, using a spatula to spread it evenly all over the surface. 10 Toss the breadcrumbs in the melted butter, then sprinkle them evenly over the top and give them a light sprinkling of celery salt. 11 Put the dish in the centre of the preheated oven and bake for 25 minutes, until the top has browned nicely and the celery stalks are tender.

Source: food.com

10 ounces couscous 18 ounces vegetable stock assorted roasted vegetables, as desired 1 fennel bulb , roasted and fronds reserved 4 ounces goats' spreadable cheese with garlic and herbs or 4 ounces feta 2 tablespoons tomato paste 4 tablespoons lime juice 4 ounces olive oil 4 tablespoons roasted cumin seeds 1 teaspoon cayenne 1 head lettuce 3 cups mesclun 1 cup spinach 1 tablespoon nigella seeds (kalonji) 1 Roast desired vegetables in hot oven, 400°F. 2 Toast cumin seeds in hot, heavy pan. Remove to mortar and pestle when toasted. Grind as desired. 3 Prepare couscous by covering couscous with hot vegetable stock. 4 While couscous is plumping, prepare dressing by mixing tomato paste, lime juice, olive oil, cumin seeds and cayenne. 5 Arrange layer of greens on large plate. 6 Arrange roasted vegetables plus fennel over greens. 7 Scatter blobs of goats' cheese over vegetables. 8 Arrange remaining greens and scatter fennel fronds over the top. 9 Sprinkle with nigella seeds. 10 Dress salad at the table.

Source: food.com

After the disappointment with American version of “The Great British Bake Off” I wasn’t sure I would watch “The Great Australian Bake Off” , but when I read that Dan Lepard would be one of the judges I immediately changed my mind: I’m a huge fan of his amazing recipes, each and every one of them I have tried so far turned out delicious. The other judge is Kerry Vincent and the woman is merciless: her sour comments and lack of tact drive the contestants to tears – she’s a crankier version of Paul Hollywood, while Dan is absolutely adorable, much like Mary Berry (I like him even more after watching the episodes). I had never heard of Kerry Vincent before and kept thinking that Delia Smith could be an excellent judge for the show, but I guess that being Australian is a requirement (I had no idea Lepard was an Aussie). :) The show is not as good as its British cousin, but it’s way better than the American version – I highly recommend it for those of you baking fanatics (like me). :) Speaking of Delia, this wonderful cake is an adaptation of a recipe that comes from her latest cookbook , which is packed with superb baked goods and beautiful photos. Apple, raspberry and pecan muffin cake slightly adapted from Delia's Cakes (I bought mine here ) 275g all purpose flour ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 level tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon table salt 170ml whole milk, room temperature 75g granulated sugar 2 large eggs 110g unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 small Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and in 1cm dice 100g raspberries, frozen and unthawed 1 heaping tablespoon demerara sugar 75g pecans, roughly chopped icing sugar, for dusting Preheat the oven to 190°/375°F. Butter a 20cm (8in) round cake pan with a removable bottom, line the bottom with a circle of baking paper and butter the paper as well. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, cinnamon, baking powder and salt. In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, sugar, eggs, butter and vanilla. Sift the dry ingredients over the egg mixture and fold in with a fork – do not overmix; fold in the apples, then transfer the batter to the prepared pan. Sprinkle the batter with the raspberries, then the demerara sugar and finally the pecans. Bake the cake for about 1 hour, checking after 50 minutes – a skewer inserted in the center should come out clean. Cool in the pan over a wire rack for 30 minutes, then carefully remove the cake from the pan using the removable bottom. When completely cooled, invert the cake onto a place, peel off the paper, then invert it again onto a serving plate. Dust with icing sugar before serving. Serves 8-10

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

2 lbs large shrimp , in their shells or 1 lb cooked and cleaned large shrimp 1 crisp-hearted Lettuce , such as Cos 1 ounce rocket 1 ripe but firm Avocado cayenne pepper 1 whole lime , divided into 6 wedge-shaped sections 1 PRAWNS:. 2 The very best version of this is made with prawns (either fresh or frozen in their shells) that you have cooked yourself. 3 Failing that, buy the large cooked prawns in their shells, or if you can only get shelled prawns, get those. 4 To prepare them: if frozen put them in a colander and allow to defrost thoroughly at room temperature for about 1 hour. 5 After that, if using uncooked prawns, heat a large solid frying pan or wok and dry-fry the prawns for 4-5 minutes until the grey turns a vibrant pink. 6 As soon as they're cool, reserve 6 in their shells for a garnish and peel the remainder. 7 Then take a small sharp knife, make a cut along the back of each peeled prawn and remove any black thread. 8 Place them in a bowl, cover with film wrap and keep in the fridge until needed. 9 TO MAKE THE SAUCE::. 10 Take mayonnaise and add it to the rest of the sauce ingredients. 11 Stir and taste to check the seasoning, then keep the sauce covered with film wrap in the refrigerator, until needed. 12 ASSEMBLY. 13 When you are ready to serve, shred the lettuce and rocket fairly finely and divide them between 6 stemmed glasses, then peel and chop the avocado into small dice and scatter this in each glass amongst the lettuce. 14 Top with the prawns and the sauce, sprinkle a dusting of cayenne pepper on top and garnish with 1 section of lime and 1 unpeeled prawn per glass. 15 Serve with brown bread and butter.

Source: food.com

450 g celery (trimmed) 50 g butter 200 g potatoes (peeled and diced) 1 small onion (finely chopped) 570 ml vegetable stock 150 ml single cream 150 g Stilton cheese salt and pepper 1 seperate stalks of celery from base and trim, reserve leaves for garnish- trimmed stalks should weigh 450g, trim outer stringy bits. scrub rest in cold water and drain, slcie across in thinnish slices. 2 in medium saucepan melt butter, stir in celery, potato and onion, stir everyting around to coat with butter put on lid turn heat low and sweat for 10 minutes. 3 uncover add stock and bring to simmering point cover again and cook for 30 minutes test veg for tendereness if not recover and cook until they are. 4 whilst this is going on prepare croutons heat olive oil in large frying pan and add cubes of bread keep them moving turning around and upside down until they have turned a deep golden brown colour and have become very crunchy and crispy, drain on kitchen paper. 5 remove saucepan from heat stir in cream then liquidise soup with crumbed stilton until quite smooth, retunr soup to rinsed out pan and reheat very gently taking care not to boil. 6 taste and season serve with croutons and celery leaves.

Source: food.com

95 g butter 175 g digestive biscuits 1 Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 4, 350 degrees Farenheit, 180 degrees Celsius. 2 Traditional Key lime pie has always had a crumb crust, begin by placing the butter in a pan over the lowest heat to melt, then crush the digestive biscuits. The easiest way to do this is to lay them out flat in a polythene bag and crush them with a rolling pin, rolling over using a lot of pressure. Now empty the contents of the bag into a bowl and mix in the melted butter. Next place the butter-crumb mixture in the flan tin and, using your hands, press it down evenly and firmly all over the base and up the sides of the tin. Then place it on the baking sheet and bake on the centre shelf of the oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crisp and golden brown. 3 While that's happening, place the egg yolks and lime zest in a bowl and, using an electric hand mixer, whisk them for about 2 minutes, or until the egg has thickened, then add the condensed milk and whisk for another 4 minutes. Finally, add the lime juice and give it another quick whisk, then pour the whole lot on to the baked crust and return it to the oven for another 20 minutes. Ten minutes in, add the meringue mixture. Now remove it from the oven and, when it's completely cold and chill until needed. Serve. 4 _This recipe is adapted from How to Cook Book Two._.

Source: food.com

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