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Saw this bread from the "The naked chef" Jamie Oliver show, since it is so simple to bake, I give it a try in one of the "Bento" day for Lucas... -Shape bread dough into long rectangle, along the middle of the bread, lay out the bacon, hard boiled eggs, shredded cheese, basil and olive oil. -Pull the dough over the filling so it forms what looks like a cannelloni shape. And bring one end round to the other so that they join up. Pinch and pat the two ends together firmly to form a doughnut-shaped loaf. Drizzle with olive oil and rosemary herbs.. - Bake at pre-heat oven at 180c for 30mins or until golden brown. Basic bread dough recipe:- 300g bread flour 10g sugar 1/2tsp salt 1stp yeast 170g water 10g extra virgin olive oil - knead and proof for 60mins

Source: nasilemaklover.blogspot.com

River Café Kitchen River Café Restaurant From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... The River Café in London was founded in 1987 by Ruth Rogers and her partner Rose Gray. The café was originally opened to feed employees of Rogers' husband, the architect Lord Richard Rogers, following the move of his company to a Thames Wharf complex where there were no restaurants in which to eat. Despite an age difference, the women had common political interests and moved in the same social circles, so, during the 1970's, they quite easily moved from nodding acquaintance to friendship. They also shared a love of food and their collaboration led to the creation of a Michelin star restaurant and six best selling cookbooks that can all be found here . In the process, their emphasis on fresh and seasonal ingredients changed the way London ate and brought the flavors of authentic Italian home cooking to a city that had been buried in steam table noodles and red sauce. While neither woman was a trained chef, they shared cooking responsibilities in the restaurant kitchen and they are credited with training young men and women who went on to become some of Britain's finest chefs. Both Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall apprenticed in their kitchen, as did April Bloomfield who is now co-owner of the Spotted Pig in New York City. Despite their native talent, much of the early success accorded to the River Café can be attributed to their stellar social connections and the left-wing glitterati that graced their tables when the restaurant first opened. The women, who both loved Italian food, set high standards for their kitchen and liked to think of their restaurant as another region of Italy. Rogers, who believes that discipline gives you freedom, learned to cook as a student, using Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking as her text. That influence, with its insistence on precision and detail, can be seen in the River Café cookbooks. Like her partner, Rose Gray was self-taught as a chef. She was the maternal presence and influence at the restaurant and her children still work there. Prior to Rose's death in 2010, both women traveled often and extensively throughout Italy, searching for ideas, techniques and recipes that could be used in the restaurant kitchen. Some say the restaurant is in decline. I can't speak to that, but I can tell you it has held on to its Michelin star and has, by any measure, had a great run. Rogers and Gray are in position 26 on the Gourmet Live list of 50 Women Game-Changers in food. The sheer number of recipes that have been developed by these women made it really difficult to select one that represents their body of work. Their most famous recipe is a flourless cake called the Chocolate Nemesis. The cake is not difficult to make but it is fickle and has developed a reputation for see-saw results that can be less than stellar in appearance. I decided to take a pass. Cowardly, I'll admit, but coming off the holiday I'm not up to high drama this week. My final choice was one of their simpler recipes, a classic pasta that's dressed with little other than lemon, olive oil and cheese. I've not had good luck with other versions of this recipe. I've found the lemon flavor to be quite harsh and not at all to my liking. I'm glad I stepped once more into the fray. Their version of the recipe, which comes from Genoa, Italy, is quite pleasant. The only trick is to use smaller lemons and no more than 1/2 cup juice. The lemon zest can carry the flavor burden in the pasta. The spaghetti makes a wonderful light supper, but it is also a natural to serve with chicken Parmesan or Sicilian sausage. Here's the recipe. Spaghetti al Limone ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray Ingredients: 9-oz. spaghetti juice of 3 to 4 lemons, the freshest possible optional: the zest (the grated, colored part of the peel) of some of those lemons 2/3 cup, olive oil 1-1/2 cups, Parmesan cheese - freshly grated (Parmigiano-Reggiano if possible) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 handfuls fresh basil leaves - chopped Directions: 1) In a generous amount of boiling salted water, cook the spaghetti just until al dente, then drain it thoroughly and return it to the hot (empty) pan. 2) Meanwhile, beat the lemon juice with the olive oil, then stir in the Parmesan until the mixture is thick and creamy. The Parmesan will melt into the mixture. Season, and add more lemon juice to taste. 3) Add the sauce to the hot, drained spaghetti and toss gently or shake the pan so that each strand is coated with the cheese. Finally, stir in the chopped basil and, ideally, some grated lemon zest. Yield: 6 servings Cooks Note: I used 16-oz. of spaghetti rather than the 9-oz. called for in the recipe. I used 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice and 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest in the sauce which was seasoned with 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. I measured 2 loosely packed cups of basil prior to cutting. Additional cheese and red pepper flakes were passed at the table. The following bloggers are also featuring the recipes of Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray today. I hope you'll visit all of them. They are great cooks who have wonderful blogs. Val - More Than Burnt Toast , Joanne - Eats Well With Others , Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed Susan - The Spice Garden , Claudia - A Seasonal Cook in Turkey , Heather - girlichef Miranda - Mangoes and Chutney , Jeanette - Healthy Living , April - Abby Sweets Katie - Making Michael Pollan Proud , Mary - One Perfect Bite , Kathleen - Bake Away with Me Viola - The Life is Good Kitchen , Sue - The View from Great Island , Barbara - Movable Feasts Kathleen - Gonna Want Seconds , Amy - Beloved Green , Linda - Ciao Chow Linda Linda A - There and Back Again , Martha - Lines from Linderhof , Nancy - Picadillo Mireya - My Healthy Eating Habits , Veronica - My Catholic Kitchen Annie - Most Lovely Things, Claudia - Journey of an Italian Cook Next week we will highlight the career and recipes of Anne Willan. It will be really interesting to see what everyone comes up with. If you'd like to join us please email me for additional information no later than Monday, December 5th.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

5 1/2 kg turkey 2 -4 clementines rosemary , bay or fresh thyme sprig 150 g butter 2 -3 carrots 3 onions , peeled 2 celery ribs 1 For the Butter:. 2 You need to finely chop the carrots, onion and celery. Chop rosemary and thyme. 3 Mix into the butter thoroughly. 4 The Turkey:. 5 Using a tablespoon, gently seperate the skin from the meat through the cavity up towards the breastbone of the bird. 6 Once the skin is separated, take half of the flavoured butter and push in between the skin and the meat. Massage so that the butter is evenly distributed. 7 The other half of the butter is to be smoothed over the outside of the turkey. 8 Using a skewer or rosemary sprigs, secure the cavity, so that the skin doesn't slide. 9 Cover in cling film and keep in the refridgerator until ready to be cooked. 10 Before cooking, chop 2-4 clementines and place in the cavity. 11 Stuff the neck of the bird with as much stuffing as possible. 12 Cook the bird on 350 / Gas Mark 4. Time scale is approx 30 minutes per kilo, plus 20 minutes at the end. 13 For best results, baste the turkey every 45 minutes. 14 Enjoy.

Source: food.com

7 ounces green beans , trimmed 20 small cherry tomatoes 1/2 cup black olives , pits removed 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil kosher salt fresh ground black pepper 4 (8 ounce) salmon fillets , with or without skin, but with pin bones removed 2 lemons , quartered 1 cup fresh basil , loosely packed 12 anchovy fillets 1 Preheat oven to 350°F Place roasting pan in oven to heat. 2 Blanch the green beans in salted, boiling water until tender. Drain and place in a mixing bowl with the cherry tomatoes and olives. Add 2 tbsp olive oil and a pinch each of salt and pepper. 3 Rinse salmon fillets and pat dry with paper towels. Squeeze 1/2 lemon over fillets, dressing both sides; reserve the remaining lemons for garnish. Sprinkle both sides of fillets with salt and pepper, and drizzle both sides with remaining olive oil. 4 Toss basil into vegetables. Place salmon fillets at one end of hot roasting tray; place vegetables at the other end. Lay anchovy fillets over vegetables. Return pan to oven and roast for 10 minute Serve with reserved lemon quarters.

Source: food.com

1 liter chicken stock (or vegetable as appropriate) 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 shallots , finely chopped (or 2 medium onions) 1 head celery , finely chopped (discard any tough outer sticks) sea salt and black pepper 2 garlic cloves , finely chopped 400 g risotto rice 100 ml dry white vermouth or 100 ml dry white wine 70 g butter 100 g freshly grated parmesan cheese 1 Stage 1. 2 Heat the stock. 3 Then in a separate pan heat the olive oil add the shallot or onion celery and a pinch of salt and sweat the vegetables for about 3 minutes. 4 Add the garlic and after another 2 minutes when the vegetables have softened add the rice. 5 Turn up the heat now. 6 At this crucial point you can`t leave the pan and anyway this is the best bit. 7 While slowly stirring continuously you are beginning to fry the rice. 8 You don`t want any colour at any point (so remember you`re in control and if the temperature seems too high turn it down a bit). 9 You must keep the rice moving. 10 After 2 or 3 minutes it will begin to look translucent as it absorbs all the flavours of your base (it may crackle at this point that`s fine). 11 Add the vermouth or wine keeping on stirring as it hits the pan it will smelt fantastic! 12 It will sizzle around the rice evapourating any harsh alcohol flavours and leaving the rice with a tasty essence. 13 I must admit I`m a sucker for dry vermouth. When it cooks into the rice it seems to give it a really full but subtle flavour and leaves a wicked sweetness that works perfectly with the rice. White wine is lovely probably more delicate and fresh. 14 Try both see what you think. 15 Stage 2. 16 Once the vermouth or wine seems to have cooked into the rice add your first ladle of hot stock and a pinch of salt (add small amounts of salt to taste white you are adding the stock). 17 Turn down the heat to a highish simmer (the reason we don`t want to boil the hell out of it is because if we do the outside of the rice wilt be cooked and fluffy and the inside will be raw). 18 Keep adding ladlefuls of stock stirring and allowing each ladleful to be absorbed before adding the next. 19 This will take about 15 minutes. 20 Taste the rice is it cooked? 21 Carry on adding stock until the rice is soft but with a slight bite. 22 Check seasoning. 23 Stage 3. 24 Remove from the heat and add the butter and the Parmesan saving a little of the latter to go on top if you like. 25 Stir gently. 26 Eat it as soon as possible while it retains its moist texture. 27 Serve it on its own or with a crisp green salad and a hunk of crusty bread. 28 If you follow this recipe I promise you`ll be making some of the best risottos out. The real secret of a good risotto I`m afraid is that you have to stand over it and give it your loving and undivided attention for about 17 minutes but it`s worth it. The recipe is in stages; I am going to give you five of my favourite risottos all variants of this basic recipe. 29 To find a dry white wine, a good rule of thumb is the greater the alcohol %, the drier the wine.

Source: food.com

500 g lamb shoulder , trimmed and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon ground red chili pepper 4 tablespoons ground sumac shelled pistachios, 1 handful mixed salad green, 3 handfuls 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves 1 red onion , very finely sliced 1 lemon 1 bunch flat leaf parsley extra virgin olive oil salt fresh ground black pepper 4 large flour tortillas 4 tablespoons creme fraiche 1 Put the pistachios into a blender and chop until they're all about half size. 2 Add the lamb and thyme, along with most of the cumin, chili and sumac (or lemon zest) (reserve a little for sprinkling on the made-up kebab). Add salt and pepper to season. 3 Pulse until it's mixed and looks like a chunky mince. If you don't pulse, you'll end up with a puree). 4 Shape onto four metal skewers, so you have four sausage shapes. Dimple the kebabs with your fingers to improve the cooked texture. 5 Place in the fridge for a couple of hours to "set" the meat a little. 6 Put kebabs onto a very hot barbecue and cook until nicely golden. 7 Meanwhile, in a bowl, mix the sliced onion with a good pinch of salt and pepper, and a squeeze of lemon juice, which will take the edge off the onion. 8 Just before the kebabs are ready, add the salad leaves, mint and parsley to the bowl and mix together. Add another pinch of salt and pepper, drizzle with olive oil and another squeeze of lemon. 9 Warm your tortillas on the griddle (or in the microwave for a few seconds). 10 Place a spoonful of the salad mix in the middle, top with a kebab and a dollop of creme fraiche, and sprinkle with a little of the left over spices. Drizzle with a little olive oil, wrap up and eat, delish!

Source: food.com

The posters for “Nymphomaniac” were released days ago and everyone is talking about them; I have zero interest in watching the movie because I did not like “Antichrist” and “Melancholia”. Many people I know tell me I should watch “Dancer in the Dark” because they’re sure I would love it but I really don’t feel like it – those other two movies made me quit Lars Von Trier, if not for good, for a real long time. The same happened with Michael Haneke – I felt so sick and miserable after watching “Funny Games U.S.” that up to this day I haven’t watched “Amour” yet – and several people I know have told me that the movie is great and that they’re sure I would love it, but I guess I’ll wait another couple of years to do that as I have the feeling I’ll cry my eyes out with Emmanuelle Riva. While I’ll avoid those directors’ films like the plague, there are others whose work drawn me immediately (can’t wait to watch “Girl Gone” and “The Wolf of Wall Street”, for example). And when it comes to baking the feeling is the same: I shy away from Jamie Oliver’s baking recipes most of times ( that banana bread scarred me for life ), while I’ll gladly try any recipe by Martha Stewart – they work every time and taste great. Here, I’ve paired Martha’s lemon cake with another baking force’s frangipane filling, the amazing Flo Braker, and it was a match made in food heaven: the cake turned out delicious and moist. One piece of advice, though: just make sure both the bowl you’re mixing the batter in and the Bundt pan are big enough because this cake is huge . :) Frangipane ripple lemon cake adapted from two great sources: Martha Stewart's Cakes and Baking for All Occasions Frangipane filling: 1/3 cup (33g) almond meal ½ cup almond paste – I used homemade, recipe here ¼ cup (50g) granulated sugar 1 large egg ¼ cup (56g) unsalted butter, softened Cake: 3 cups (420g) all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon table salt 1 cup (226g/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature 2 ¼ cups (450g) granulated sugar finely grated zest of 3 large lemons 1/3 cup (80ml) fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 tablespoons limoncello (optional; if using, add another tablespoon of flour to the 3 cups listed on the recipe) 6 large eggs 1 cup sour cream* confectioners' sugar, for dusting Make the filling: in a food processor, combine the almond meal, almond paste and sugar and process until well mixed. Add the egg and butter and process until smoothly blended. Cover and refrigerate while you make the cake batter (my food processor is broken, so I made the filling using an electric mixer). Now, the cake: preheat oven to 180°C/350°C. Butter and flour a standard 12-cup Bundt pan. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt; set aside. Using an electric mixer, beat butter, granulated sugar and zest on medium-high until light and fluffy, 4 to 5 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition; mix in lemon juice, vanilla and limoncello (if using). With mixer on low, alternately add flour mixture in three parts and sour cream in two, beginning and ending with flour mixture; mix just until incorporated (do not overmix). Remove the frangipane from the refrigerator. Spoon about 2 cups of the cake batter into the prepared pan, spreading it evenly. Spoon half of the frangipane in dollops over the center of the batter, and then spread it over the cake batter avoiding the center tube and sides of the pan. Spoon half of the remaining batter evenly over the filling. Spoon the remaining frangipane over the batter, spreading it evenly. Spread the remaining batter over the top and spread evenly. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean, 55-60 minutes (if cake browns too quickly, tent loosely with aluminum foil). Let cake cool in pan 20 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to cool completely. (To store, wrap cake in plastic, and keep at room temperature, up to 3 days.) Dust with confectioners' sugar before serving. * homemade sour cream: to make 1 cup of sour cream, mix 1 cup (240ml) heavy cream with 2-3 teaspoons lemon juice in a bowl. Whisk until it starts to thicken. Cover with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature for 1 hour or until thicker (I usually leave mine on the counter overnight – except on very warm nights – and it turns out thick and silky in the following morning; refrigerate for a creamier texture) Serves 10-12

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 lb pancetta 2 lbs heirloom tomatoes, cored 5 fresh bay leaves or 2 dried bay leaves 2 tablespoons fresh oregano 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary 1 lb sausage 1 tablespoon olive oil 5 -6 garlic cloves 1 Preheat a roasting pan in a 350F (180C) oven. Add olive oil and pancetta; return to oven until pancetta is crispy. Push to one side and add herbs. 2 Put tomatoes into roasting pan, core hole down. Return to oven until tomato skins blister, about 5 minutes. Pinch off tomato skins. Toss carefully to keep tomatoes from falling apart. 3 Drizzle sausage with olive oil and rub in well. Place sausages into pan, pushing down amongst the tomatoes. Toss in garlic cloves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Return pan to oven for 1 hour, turning sausages once or twice. 4 Serve with crusty Italian bread, polenta or rice. Drizzle with a little high-quality balsamic vinegar.

Source: food.com

1/2 lb mixed heirloom tomato, various colors 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1/2 small fresh red chili pepper , deseeded and chopped finely (optional) 1/2 garlic clove , grated 1 tablespoon fresh coriander 1/2 lemon, juice of 1 Cut tomatoes roughly into bite sized pieces. Toss into a colander. Sprinkle liberally with kosher salt. Toss well and allow to drain 15 minutes. 2 Transfer to a serving bowl. Add oregano, olive oil, vinegar, chili and garlic; toss well. Marinate 15 minutes. 3 Roughly chop the tomatoes with the coriander. Stir in lemon juice. Serve with fish or chicken.

Source: food.com

2 lbs stewing beef , diced 1 onion , chopped 4 garlic cloves , minced 3 stalks celery , chopped 4 ounces button mushrooms , chopped 4 bay leaves 1 teaspoon thyme 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 (15 ounce) can Guinness stout 3 1/2 cups beef broth 1 1/2 tablespoons flour 1 Pre-heat the oven to 350°F. 2 In a large dutch oven, heat some olive oil over medium heat. Toss the meat cubes with the 1 ½ tbsp of flour, and then in batches, brown them until seared. Remove to plate as you go. 3 Add more oil if you need to, then add the celery, onion, and garlic. Cook and stir until the vegetables are soft. Add the thyme and season with salt and pepper. Stir in the mushrooms, bay leaves, broth, tomato paste, and Guinness; bring to a boil, then cover and put into the oven. 4 Let the stew bubble away in the oven for two hours. Mean while, make the dumplings. 5 In a bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, a pinch of nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Cut in your bits of butter with a pastry cutter, and then stir in the cheese. Add milk, stirring until you get a wet dough. You may need more or less, use your judgment. 6 Spoon out portions of the dough about the size of a ping pong ball, roll them with your hands, and place on a cookie sheet. Put them in the fridge to chill while the stew cooks. 7 When the stew is finished, plop the dumplings in one at a time, pushing them under the juices, and then put a lid back on and allow them to cook for another 30 minutes.

Source: food.com

11 ounces small shell pasta 3 garlic cloves 9 ounces yellow cherry tomatoes 9 ounces cherry tomatoes 1/2 cup black olives , pitted 2 tablespoons fresh chives 1/4 cup fresh basil 1 medium cucumber 4 tablespoons white wine vinegar 7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil sea salt fresh ground black pepper 1 Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil. 2 Throw in the pasta and garlic and simmer for about 5 minutes or until al dente, and drain. 3 Put the garlic to one side for the dressing. 4 Put the pasta in a bowl. 5 Chop the tomatoes, olives, chives, basil and cucumber into pieces about half the size of the pasta and add to the bowl. 6 Squash the garlic cloves out of their skins and pound in a pestle and mortar. 7 Add the vinegar, oil and seasoning. 8 Drizzle this over the salad, adding a little more seasoning to taste.

Source: food.com

500 g plain flour 100 g lard 150 g butter salt 2 large eggs 1 Preheat the oven to 190° Celsius. 2 Rub together the flour and the fat. 3 Add the eggs and bring together carefully. 4 Chill in the refrigator for 1 hour. 5 Once your pastry has chilled roll it out to fit an 11-inch/28-centimeter tin with a removable bottom and bake it blind for 10 minutes. 6 Lower the oven temperatur to 180° Celsius. 7 Mix all the filling ingredients together then pour the filling into the pastry case. 8 Sprinkle over the goat's cheese, lay over the pancetta slices and then finish off with a drizzle of thyme oil. 9 Bake in the oven for 30 minutes.

Source: food.com

I’ve realized that I’ve been craving vegetables more and more each day, instead of meat: the more I eat vegetables, the more I want to eat them, in all sorts of ways – every time I see a great vegetarian recipe around I want to try it immediately. (That said, I’ll cook Jamie Oliver’s roast beef tomorrow for lunch. :D My husband saw a bit of the show days ago while I was watching it and has been craving that dish ever since, with all the trimmings, including the Yorkshire puddings – I have made Jamie’s yorkies and they’re oh, so good). Back to the vegetables, I saw these pea pancakes on Valli Little’s stunning cookbook and right away thought that they would be great for a snack – I had everything in my fridge and pantry to make them, and on top of it all it would take me moments to put them together, even making the ricotta from scratch, which is super easy and I highly recommend you try – I doubt you’ll ever buy ricotta again. The pancakes turned out delicious, light and fluffy, and I ate them with sweet chili sauce, as per the author’s suggestion – she also suggests the pancakes to be served with bacon, but even though I’m crazy about it I don’t think it was necessary here. Pea pancakes slightly adapted from the über beautiful Delicious. Love to Cook 120g frozen peas 2 eggs 200g fresh ricotta – I highly recommend using homemade ¼ cup finely grated parmesan 1 teaspoon olive oil + more for frying the pancakes ¼ cup (45g) all purpose flour ¼ teaspoon baking powder salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 spring onions, white part only, finely chopped Cook the peas in boiling salted water for 5 minutes, drain and refresh under cold water. Drain well and set aside. Place eggs, parmesan, ricotta, 1 teaspoon olive oil, flour, baking powder, salt and pepper in a medium bowl and stir to combine. Stir in the peas and spring onions, cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Heat ½ tablespoon of olive oil in a large nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Scoop two tablespoons of mixture per pancakes and place onto the pan, pressing each to 1cm (½ in) thickness. Cook for 3 minutes each side or until golden. Serve immediately. Makes 6

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

As someone who loves anything related to food, I love reading about it, making and eating it (obviously), but I also find it amazing to talk about it with different people and learn what they like, what they don’t like and how their tastes change with time. I have those conversations with my husband all the time, and he tells me about the food he ate as a kid, things he loved and things he couldn’t stand, how it took him so long to appreciate all sorts of vegetables, and that his mother would be really glad to see him finally eating like an adult (she passed away in 2011). Every time Joao and I talk about those things I feel more inspired to cook, and when he asked me to make meatballs – one of his all time favorite dishes – I remembered Jamie Oliver’s meatballs alla Norma and thought that a bit of eggplant in the meatballs wouldn’t hurt. I love eggplant . :) The eggplant sauce tasted divine with the meatballs; Jamie served his over polenta, but since it was too hot here I went with spaghetti instead and some bread to mop up the sauce – a simple yet delicious meal that I get to replicate anytime I want with the meatballs I stashed in my freezer. Meatballs alla Norma slightly adapted from the always delicious Save with Jamie: Shop Smart, Cook Clever, Waste Less Meatballs – recipe here Sauce: 1 large eggplant olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 400g (14oz) can diced tomatoes salt and freshly ground black pepper handful fresh basil leaves Dice the eggplant into 1.5 cm cubes, then season well with salt and leave for 15 min in a colander. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F. Line a large baking sheet with a double layer of foil and brush it with olive oil. Place the meatballs onto the prepared sheet and bake until firm and cooked through (about 30 minutes) – bake as many as you want, the recipe yields about 25 meatballs. You can freeze uncooked meatballs for up to 2 months and bake them directly from frozen. While the meatballs are in the oven, make the sauce: take handfuls of the eggplant and squeeze out the excess salty liquid, then put into a saucepan on a medium heat with a lug of oil to cook for 10 min, or until golden, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant. Stir in the sweet chili sauce and balsamic, add the tomatoes and 3 tablespoons water. Season with salt and black pepper, then simmer for 10-15 min, or until thickened. Stir in the basil and remove from the heat. Add the meatballs to the sauce and serve immediately. Serves 4

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com



This recipe features: Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well)

Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is what makes Thai Chicken Coconut Soup so irresistible – the initial kick of the spicy chile pepper and lime, followed by salty/savory that’s tempered with a touch of sugar. The creamy coconut milk lingers to soothe the spiciness and allows all the distinct flavors to play nicely with each other.







This recipe is from Chef Lorraine Pascale, a #1 bestselling author in the U.K.  Her book, Everyday Easy features elegant, fuss-free cooking for weeknight dinners. Lorraine Pascale is the undisputed queen of the kitchen, queen of the simple and the simply delicious.Jamie Oliver

Recipes include: Thai Beef Salad with Roasted Peanuts and Chili Dressing Shrimp Caeser Salad Lozza’s Lamb Biryani Goat Cheese, Toasted Hazelnut Honey Quesadillas with Arugula Salad Crouching Tiger, Hidden Zebra Cake

and many, many more. Each recipe is easy, breezy and complete with a gorgeous color photograph. The Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe is by Lorraine Pascale, photo is also from the cookbook, by Myles New. Yum

Source: steamykitchen.com

Watching a Brazilian cooking show the other day I thought it was really disgusting to see the presenter transfer the cake batter to the pan using his hands: as much as one uses their hands for cooking and baking – and I certainly do that a lot – there are tools for determined actions. Jamie Oliver practically kneading his guacamole on this video almost made me lose my lunch – there are certain cooking habits I really can’t stand. I don’t like to think of myself as a conservative person but I guess I am. I do, however, have a more liberal side when it comes to cooking and unusual recipes always get my attention – how could I resist baking brownies that contain no chocolate at all? These delicious bars taste like baked curd and are irresistible. Lemon and coconut brownies slightly adapted from here 250g unsalted butter 350g granulated sugar 4 eggs 225g all purpose flour pinch of salt 1 cup (100g) sweetened flaked coconut finely grated zest of 2 large lemons ¼ cup (60ml) fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract icing sugar, to dust Preheat oven to 180°C/350°F. Lightly butter a 20x30cm (8x12in) baking pan, line it with foil leaving two overhands on opposite sides and butter the paper as well. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Remove from heat and stir in sugar. Add eggs, 1 at a time, and stir until mixture is thick and glossy. Sift the flour and salt over the egg mixture and stir until well combined. Stir in coconut, lemon zest and juice and vanilla. Pour into prepared pan. Bake for about 30 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Cool completely in the pan over a wire rack. Dust with icing sugar then cut into bars. Makes 20

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

I guess that when it comes to cooking and baking we all have our favorites - I certainly do, and the list includes Nigella, Jamie Oliver, Donna Hay and, of course, Martha: her baking recipes are always a hit and these cookies are no exception, delicious and dead easy to make. I got two logs of dough from this recipe and thought of keeping one in the freezer for another day, but after trying one of the cookies I knew I should bake as many as possible. :) Lady Grey tea cookies from one of my favorite cookbooks 2 cups (280g) all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons finely ground Lady Grey tea leaves (from about 4 bags)* ¼ teaspoon table salt 1 cup (226g/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened ½ cup (70g) confectioners' sugar, sifted finely grated zest of 1 large orange 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Whisk flour, tea, and salt in a small bowl; set aside. Put butter, sugar, orange zest and vanilla in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Reduce speed to low; gradually mix in flour mixture until just combined – at this point I tasted the dough and thought it wasn’t sweet enough, so I added 1 ½ tablespoons icing sugar. Divide the dough into two equal parts. Place each on a piece of parchment paper; shape dough into logs. Fold parchment over dough; using a ruler, roll and press into a 3.5 cm (1.4in) log – like Martha does here . Wrap in parchment. Chill in freezer until very firm. Preheat oven to 180°C/350°F; line two large baking sheets with baking paper. Unwrap one log at a time (keep the other in the freezer). Cut into 6mm (¼in) thick rounds; space 2.5cm (1in) apart onto prepared sheets. Bake, rotating sheets halfway through, until golden brown around the edges, about 15 minutes. Cool completely on the sheets over a wire rack. * I used this grinder to grind the tea leaves Makes about 50 cookies

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

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