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How do you cook quinoa? I was recently asked. The answer is simple. Easy. Fast. Rockin'. I cook it in a rice cooker. In fact, quinoa is the easiest no-fuss grain you'll ever cook. It's healthy fast food. Cook up a batch ahead of time and you can stir up a fabulous light lunch (like the Lime Quinoa Salad with Mint ) in a New York minute. Well, maybe a Los Angeles minute. No wait. A Venice Beach minute. Quinoa salads are as easy as one - two - three. How to cook quinoa the easy way: 1. Using a fine mesh sieve rinse 1 cup of organic quinoa in cold water (unless it states on the box that you don't need to rinse). 2. Dump rinsed quinoa into your rice cooker. 3. Add 2 cups fresh water* see notes. 4. Turn on your rice cooker . That's it. In about fifteen minutes* you'll have hot fluffy quinoa to play with. Quinoa is rather bland on its own and loves flavor spikes. So add herbs etc. My favorite thing to do is stir-fry cooked quinoa with various seasonings- herbs, garlic, spices, onion, etc. I add in fresh veggies and whatever else I might have on hand. Quinoa makes delicious and hearty pilaf, sprightly salads, or a warm and grainy side dish in place of rice. I've even used it to stuff cabbage, acorn squash, peppers and portobello mushroom caps. For those of you without a rice cooker: Add the cup of rinsed organic quinoa to a saucepan ; add 2 cups fresh water; bring to a boil, lower the heat to low; cover and simmer until cooked. Fluff with a fork. Season while warm and use in salads or stuffing recipes, Store covered, in the fridge, for almost instant meals. Use within three days for best taste. Notes* Start with 2 cups water in a rice cooker. At higher altitudes , use more water-- 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 cups water. High altitude also requires a longer cooking time, generally. If the quinoa turns out too crunchy or nubby you need to up the ratio of water to grain; start by adding another 1/4 cup liquid. I prefer my quinoa soft and tender, fluffed with a fork. Note- r ed and black quinoa may require extra water- especially if it turns out more crunchy than fluffy. Sometimes I add broth to the liquid to boost the flavor of the quinoa- this works especially well when making a savory pilaf or winter quinoa with hearty flavors- onion, mushrooms, eggplant, etc. I don't use broth in my lighter salad style quinoa dishes- but that's my personal taste. Quinoa is very laid back and not full of itself at all. It's not upper crust or snobby, or ultra-cool and exclusive. I imagine Tony Bourdain hates it (he likes to mock vegetarians, you know, which spurs him to demonstrate just how much by eating blow fish, animal tongues and roasted insects on camera , not to mention drinking fresh from the writhing snake blood tonic and chewing on various goat parts buried in a pit for two days). If it were a movie, quinoa would star a flip-flop wearing Jeff Bridges and insist you call it Dude. Or Duderino if you're not into the whole brevity thing. Besides its worth-its-weight-in-gold gluten-free status, quinoa (sounds like: keen-wa) is a superb source of balanced vegetable protein (so important for vegans and vegetarians ) that packs a nutty nutritional punch. It contains nine amino acids- making it a complete vegetable protein. Some call it a super grain (I always envision a blazing red Q and a windswept cape when the word super is touted- a testimony to my visual thinking process) but quinoa, I have to tell you is not a cereal grain, Bubela. It's actually a seed from a plant family that includes beets and spinach. That might- technically- make it a Super Faux Grain. Or Faux Super Grain. I know. It doesn't have the same ring. Do we care? Here are some of my favorite quinoa recipes: Kale Salad with Quinoa, Tangerines and Roasted Almonds Lime Quinoa Salad with Mint Peanut Butter Quinoa Cookies Quinoa Breakfast Bars with Blueberries Quinoa Breakfast Brownies Quinoa Breakfast Cake Quinoa Chocolate Brownies Quinoa with Fresh Summer Vegetables Quinoa with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Leeks, and Slivered Almonds Quinoa Salad with Blueberries, Strawberries, and Watermelon Quinoa Salad with Pears, Baby Spinach, Chick Peas in Maple Vinaigrette Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets, Chick Peas + Orange Quinoa Salad with Yellow Grape Tomatoes, Kalamata Olives, Basil and Mint Quinoa Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms Quinoa Muffins with Pecans + Dark Chocolate Quinoa Mushroom Pilaf Quinoa Pumpkin Cookies Quinoa Taco Salad Red Quinoa with Roasted Butternut Squash + Pecans Stuffed Cabbage with Roasted Sweet Potato and Quinoa Vegan Garden Loaf with Maple Apricot Glaze Warm Spinach and Quinoa Salad with Grape Tomatoes Quinoa recipes from food blogs: At Lydia's Perfect Pantry Quinoa Salad with Tomatoes, Feta and Parsley Heidi's Warm and Nutty Cinnamon Quinoa - for breakfast- at 101 Cookbooks Susan's Quinoa Vegetable Paella at FatFree Vegan Kitchen Ilva's Quinoa Apple Cake with Cinnamon and Coconut at Lucullian Delights Susan at Food Blogga's Inca Quinoa Salad Perfect Pantry's Black Bean Quinoa Red Pepper Salad with Honey-Lime Vinaigrette Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you.

Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

You've probably heard by now about how the fabulous food blogger fundraiser, A Menu for Hope , raised the amazing sum of $91,188 to benefit the UN World Food Program . Thanks to all the generous people who donated prizes or bought raffle tickets! Also, much thanks to Chez Pim , organizer of the event, and other regional hosts: Serious Eats , Vinography , Rasa Malaysia , The Domestic Goddess , Food Beam , Grab Your Fork , Cooksister , and The Passionate Cook . The central U.S. region, was hosted by Kalyn's Kitchen, so keep reading below to see the list of winners from our region, then if your name is listed, contact the blogger who sponsored the prize to let them know you were the winner. To see if you won a prize from one of the other regions, check out the complete list of prizes at Chez Pim . UC01 One of four original landscape photographs from use real butter Reema T Bhakta UC02 Morgan Ranch Wagyu Sirloin Sizzler Pack from Gastronomic Fight Club Rochelle McCune UC03 Morgan Ranch Wagyu Carving Roast from Gastronomic Fight Club Christopher W. Towe UC04 1 1/2 quart white Cuisinart automatic ice cream maker and David Lebovitz's book, The Perfect Scoop, from Bon Appegeek Mary Severance UC05 $100 gift certificate for Penzeys from Columbus Foodie Rachel L Lorenz-Morales UC06 Four Indian cookbooks with spice tin, spices, Indian teas, and assorted dals from Tigers and Strawberries Danielle Sucher UC07 All-Clad MasterChef2 (MC2) 6 QT Saute Pot with Lid and Loop from Cincinnati Locavore Anne Delekta UC08 Facsimile Copy of only known of cookbook by the first African American published in the 19th century from Ahaar Durga Ray UC09 Guide to good Parmesan by Ari Weinzweig from Ahaar Durga Ray UC10 Dorie Greenspan's Baking from My Home to Yours, and a box of freshly ground baking spices from Rolling in Dough Alexis L Schimberg UC11 Phone Call From A Foodie Farmgirl from Farmgirl Fare Jane P Gardner UC12 Grains, Greens, and Grated Coconuts, Recipes and Remembrances of a Vegetarian Legacy by Ammini Ramachandran from Indian Food Rocks CL Boileau UC13 Handmade bead necklace and matching earrings from Indian Food Rocks Gayathri Venkitachalam UC14 8 oz. hand-crafted pancetta from Seriously Good Valerie J. Taylor UC15 One pound of Costa Rica Tres Rios coffee and collection of Vosges chocolate truffles from Gaper's Block Drive-Thru Amy E. Schuler UC16 Photostudio-in-a-Box and Fine Cooking Annual from Kalyn's Kitchen Elke Sisco UC17 Six months subscription to Chef-on-Call service from Chefsline.com Sarah Cassin UC18 A Taste of Ann Arbor from Gastronomical Three Amy Ginn UC19 Collection of 12 vintage cookbooks from Cooking Vintage Savina Tessitore UC20 Autographed copy of the new full-color cookbook, My Sweet Vegan by Hannah Kaminsky from Bittersweet Blog Heather E Thicke UC21 Homemade cheesecake made for you by Jennifer from Bake or Break Elizabeth Deane UC22 Stainless steel breadmaker from Dine and Dish Christina Chaivorapol UC23 Jeni's Ice Cream from Restaurant Widow Kalen Delaney UC24 Autographed copy of Anthony Bourdain Book from Moveable Feast William W Mon UC25 Polyscience thermal circulator from Moveable Feast Kathleen Bashford UC26 Moto - chef for a day from Moveable Feast David Mortman UC27 A bottle of real Absinthe from Moveable Feast Jeffrey Stai UC28 Hot Doug's celebrity sausage from Moveable Feast Katie Myers UC29 Espresso maker and 4 lbs coffee, grinder, and t-shirt from The Blissful Glutton Catherine Curtis UC30 Package from Alinea, including two early proofs, limited edition book, and early access to the Alinea Mosaic site in May '08, via Chez Pim Nick Szluk UC31 Autographed copy of Anthony Bourdain Book from Moveable Feast Anne M Karle Zenith UC32 Autographed copy of Anthony Bourdain Book from Moveable Feast Christina Chaivorapol UC33 Autographed copy of Anthony Bourdain Book from Moveable Feas t Robert Mullen UC34 Autographed copy of Anthony Bourdain Book from Moveable Feast Alexander N Aird

Source: kalynskitchen.blogspot.com

This page has South Beach Diet Phase One recipes for Soup, Stew, or Chili that I've featured on Kalyn's Kitchen. (Since phase one recipes are also good for any other phase, these recipes are categorized "all phases" in the recipe archives.) Dishes that are "all beans" are limited to 1/3 - 1/2 cup portion size for phase one. You could have a larger portion size for dishes which contain meat and/or vegetables with the beans. Click for Latest Info About Printing Recipes on Kalyn's Kitchen Phase One Recipes for Chili Slow Cooker Recipe for Beef and Refried Bean Chili with Salsa and Lime (all phases, but a small serving for phase one) Vegan Lentil Chili with Roasted Red Peppers, Olives, and Green Onion (all phases, but a small serving for Phase One) Amy's Amazing White Chicken Chili (all phases) Black Bean and Beef Chili with Cilantro, Lime, and Avocado Salsa (all phases) Crockpot Black Bean Chili with Lime and Cilantro (all phases ) Leftover Turkey (or ground turkey) and Pinto Bean White Chili with Lime and Cilantro (all phases) Not Just For the Superbowl Chili (all phases) Turkey and White Bean Chili with Chocolate ( all phases ) Phase One Recipes for Soup Indian-Spiced Slow Cooker Red Lentil Soup with Spinach and Coconut Milk (all phases, limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Greek Lentil Soup with Tomatoes, Spinach, and Feta (all phases, limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Cabbage Soup with Tomatoes, Chicken-Garlic Sausage, and Parmesan (all phases) Lucky Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Chicken Garlic Sausage and Bell Peppers (all phases) Spicy Slow Cooker Soup with Ground Turkey, Pinto Beans, Red Bell Pepper, and Green Chiles (all phases) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Shaved Parmesan (all phases) Slow Cooker Recipe for Spicy Ground Beef and Bean Soup with Cabbage and Spinach (all phases) Green Zebra Gazpacho with Cucumber and Avocado (all phases) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Anasazi Bean and Cabbage Soup (all phases if you leave out carrots, phase 2 or 3 with carrots) Butter Bean (or Lima Bean) Soup with Ham and Cabbage (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Ham and Sherry Vinegar (all phases) Cannelini Bean Soup with Roasted Italian Sausage and Escarole (all phases) Chard and Chickpea Soup with Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Chicken and Pinto Bean Soup with Lime and Cilantro ( all phases ) Chicken, Black Bean and Cilantro Soup (all phases) Chicken and Tomatillo Soup (all phases) Chicken Soup with Garbanzos and Oregano (all phases) Chickpea (garbanzo bean) Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Basil (all phases) Chipotle and Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Double Cilantro (all phases) Confetti Gazpacho (cold tomato soup) with Yellow Tomatoes, Red Peppers, and Basil (all phases) Leftover Corned Beef Soup with Sauerkraut and Tomatoes (all phases, but corned beef is an occasional treat due to fat content) Double Mushroom Soup (inspired by Anthony Bourdain's Mushroom Soup Recipe) (all phases) Garbanzo and White Bean Soup with Lamb and Rosemary (all phases without the carrots) Garbanzo Bean (Chickpea) Soup with Garlic, Sumac, Olive Oil, and Lemon (all phases) Gazpacho (cold tomato soup) (all phases) Goulash Soup with Red Pepper and Cabbage (all phases) Ground Beef and Sauerkraut Soup (all phases) Healing Asian Soup with Ginger, Spinach, and Mushrooms (all phases) Hopping John Soup (Black-eyed Peas, Ham, and Collard Greens) ( all phases ) Italian Sausage and Bean Soup with Chard (all phases) Leftover Turkey Soup with Double Mushrooms (leave out carrots for phase 1) Lentil Soup with Italian Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers (all phases) Pressure Cooker Vegetable Soup with Giant White Beans, Ham, and Bay leaves (all phases) Revithia - Greek Chickpea Soup with Lemon and Olive Oil (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Red Lentil, Chickpea, and Tomato Soup with Smoked Paprika (all phases, but a limited serving for phase one) Roasted Italian Sausage Soup with Garbanzos, Lentils, and Roasted Tomatoes (all phases) Sausage and Red Russian Kale Soup with Tomatoes, Chickpeas, and Herbs (all phases) Spicy Pinto Bean Soup with Ham, Tomatoes, and Cilantro (pressure cooker or soup pot instructions) (all phases) Spicy Sausage, Lentil, and Tomato Soup (all phases) Spicy Yellow Split Pea Soup with Italian Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Bay Leaves, Epazote, and Red Bell Pepper or Carrots (all phases, but use red bell pepper for phase one) Taco Soup Recipe (all phases) Thai Chicken Soup (all phases) Tomato and Cilantro Soup (all phases) Vegetarian Black Bean and Tomatillo Soup with Lime and Cilantro (all phases) Vegetarian Lentil Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Cumin (all phases) White Bean and Ham Soup with Chard ( all phases ) White Bean Soup with Ham and Rosemary ( all phases but leave out the carrots for phase one ) White Bean Soup with Roasted Turkey Italian Sausage, Zucchini, and Basil ( all phases ) Zucchini and Yellow Squash Soup with Rosemary and Parmesan (all phases) Phase One Recipes for Stew Slow Cooker Cannellini Bean Stew with Tomatoes, Italian Sausage, and Kale (all phases) Slow Cooker Kielbasa and White Bean Stew with Tomatoes and Spinach (all phases) Vegetarian Mushroom Stew with Red Bell Pepper, Onion, and Paprika (all phases) Mushroom, White Bean, and Tomato Stew with Parmesan (all phases if served plain in a bowl; phase 2 or 3 if served over rice) Ground Chicken (or Turkey ) and Chickpea Curry Stew with Yogurt and Cilantro (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Pork and Green Chile Stew - Nefi's Green Chile Stew (all phases) Navy Bean and Refried Bean Stew with Ham, Leeks, and Tomatoes (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Sausage, Peppers, and Cannellini Bean Stew with Parmesan (all phases) West African Chicken and Peanut Stew with Chiles, Ginger, and Green Onions (all phases) Mexican Red Lentil Stew with Lime and Cilantro (all phases, vegan) Beef Stew with Dried Mushrooms (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Lentil Stew with Ham (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Sausage Stew with Tomatoes and Basil (all phases) Crockpot Beef Stew with Olives, Garlic, Capers, and tomatoes (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Black Bean Stew with Roasted Red Pepper, Chicken, and Cilantro (stovetop instructions included - all phases) Ground Turkey and Bean Stew with Cumin, Green Chiles, and Cilantro (all phases) Italian Sausage and White Beans with Sage (all phases) Leftover Roast Beef Italian Stew (all phases) Slow Cooker Mediterranean Beef Stew with Rosemary and Balsamic Vinegar (all phases) Pinto Bean and Ground Beef Stew with Cumin and Cilantro (pressure cooker or soup pot instructions) (all phases) Sausage and Lentils with Fried Sage ( all phases ) Sausage, Beans and Greens (all phases) Spicy Red Fish Stew (all phases) Spicy Red Lentil and Chickpea Stew / Paula's Moroccan Lentil Stew (phase one without rice) Spicy Sauteed Chickpeas with Beef and Cilantro (all phases) Things you might want to know: You can get Kalyn's recipes by e-mail. There are two ways to print recipes on Kalyn's Kitchen. You can become a fan of Kalyn's Kitchen on Facebook . Sometimes you can see what I'm doing on Twitter . Here is another place where I write more about food.

Source: kalynskitchen.blogspot.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I wanted to post this recipe on the odd chance you have not yet tried Maida Heatter's Chocolate Mint Brownies. While they are delicious at any time, their layer of mint cream makes them especially appropriate for the St.Patrick's Day holiday. This is a layered treat. It begins with a dense fudgy brownie that is covered with peppermint cream and then coated with a gleaming, dark chocolate glaze. The peppermint cream can, of course, be tinted for those who wear the green and love overt symbols of the holiday. Brownies are one of the easiest dessert that can be made in our kitchens. They rarely require special equipment and this recipe can be made with a couple of bowls and a wooden spoon. Despite the ease with which these can be made, I promise you they are delicious. Just don't overbake them. While these can be made several days ahead of serving, they lose their sheen when refrigerated. I love the chocolate-mint combination and use it often. It works especially well here. If you need a dessert for St. Patrick's Day, I think you'll love this one. Here's the recipe. Double Chocolate Mint Brownies ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Maida Heatter Ingredients: Brownie Layer 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cut into pieces 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, coarsely chopped 1-1/4 cups granulated white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt Mint Layer 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup confectioners' sugar, sifted 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon pure peppermint extract or 1 to 2 tablespoons creme de menthe Green food coloring (optional) Chocolate Glaze 3 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F and place the rack in the center of the oven. 2) Line a 9 x 9-inch pan with aluminum foil, covering bottom and two opposite sides of pan. Foil is used to lift brownies from pan. Set aside. 3) In a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water, melt butter and chocolate. Remove from heat and stir in sugar and vanilla extract. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well with a wooden spoon after each addition. Stir in flour and salt and beat, with a wooden spoon, until batter is smooth and glossy and comes away from sides of pan (about one minute). Pour batter evenly into prepared pan. Bake in preheated oven for about 25 minutes or until brownies start to pull away from the sides of pan and the edges of brownies are just beginning to brown. A toothpick inserted in center of brownies will come out almost clean. Remove from oven and place on a rack to completely cool. 4) To make mint layer, combine butter, confectioners' sugar, heavy cream, peppermint extract in a small bowl and beat until smooth. Add a few drops of green food coloring if you wish. If frosting is too thick, add a little extra cream. (Frosting should be just thin enough to spread.) Spread frosting evenly over cooled brownie layer. Place in refrigerator for about 5-10 minutes, or until firm. 5) To make chocolate glaze, melt chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Spread over mint filling and refrigerate for about 30 minutes or until chocolate glaze starts to dull. 6) To serve, remove brownies from pan by lifting with ends of foil and transfer to a cutting board. With a sharp knife, cut into 30 squares. These brownies can be refrigerated for several days or else frozen. Yield: 30 squares. You might also enjoy these recipes: Chocolate Mint Brownies - David Lebovitz Salted Fudge Brownies - Verses from My Kitchen Peanut Butter Brownies - Being Suzy Homemaker Cakey Chocolate Brownies - Cookerati Chocolate Brownie - The Purple Foodie Quick and Easy Mocha Fudge Brownies - The Perfect Pantry Oreo Brownies with Buttercream Frosting - Love from the Oven Pecan Caramel Fudge Brownies - The Art of Baking Hot Chocolate Brownies - Sugar Plum Chocolate Cheesecake Brownie - Almost Bourdain Kahlua Brownies - Simply Recipes Iced Butterscotch Brownies - Culinary in the Dessert Mexican Chocolate Brownies - One Perfect Bite Bittersweets:The Ultimate Brownie - One Perfect Bite Red Velvet Cheesecake Brownies - Baking Bites

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} What Les Halles is the Recipes to Rival challenge of the month? It's Anthony Bourdain's version of coq au vin. He describes this dish as "an old, tough bird that you have to drown in wine to get to taste good." Unfortunately, there's more to it than that. There are several disparate steps to this recipe. There is, of course, the braising of the chicken, but the completed dish is enhanced by separate preparations of onions and mushrooms that require special care. The end product can be quite lovely. My problem? My culinary skills, whatever they are, were honed in the 70's and early 80's of the last century. That means I've made a lot of coq au vin and have some very firm opinions as to how it should be prepared. The hard part was keeping my changes to a minimum and preparing the recipe as it was written. I think I did fairly well. Change number one; the recipe called for a stewing hen. Local butchers laughed at me, so I used a 3-1/2 pound free range chicken. Change number two; I substituted a good shiraz for the burgundy wine that's normally used because I prefer to drink shiraz. Change number three; I added a quantity of thick (almost jelly-like) chicken stock to cover the chicken as it braised. Change number four; I increased the amount of bacon used in the recipe to 6-ounces, but blanched the lardons before adding them to the pot. Change number five; I used thawed, frozen pearl onions instead of fresh. My family can deftly move onions from one side of the plate to another before burying them under chicken bones, so the onions are just for show and I refuse to kill myself preparing them. Change number six; I added 1 tablespoon of tomato paste to kill the purple color of the wine that caused the chicken to look black and blue. I also reduce the sauce by half before napping the chicken and vegetables. Technically, when a young chicken is used to replace the stewing hen the dish should be called braised chicken, not coq au vin. I'll never forget how the use of a young bird offended Andre Soltner when he judged a Top Chef episode. If you have time and would like to prepare coq au vin in the classical manner, you'll love this recipe. It is delicious, but it does take time that includes a 24 hour marination. My changes can be identified by red print. The original recipe can be found at Recipes to Rival . This months challenge is being hosted by founders Temperance of High on the Hog and Lori of Lipsmacking Goodness . Coq au Vin from the Les Halles Cookbook, by Anthony Bourdain Ingredients: 1 bottle/1 liter plus 1 cup/225 ml of red wine - I used Rosemont shiraz 1 onion, cut into a 1-inch/2.5 cm dice 1 carrot, cut into ¼-inch/6-mm slices 1 celery rib, cut into ½ inch/1-cm slices 4 whole cloves 1 tbs/14 g whole black peppercorns 1 bouquet garni - a bay leaf, 3 sprigs of thyme and 4 sprigs parsley tied in a large coffee filter 1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 to 3 cups reduced chicken stock 1 whole chicken, about 3.5 lb/1.35 kg, “trimmed” – meaning guts, wing tips and neckbone removed salt and freshly ground pepper 1 tbs/28 ml olive oil 6 tbs/75 g butter, softened 1 tbs/14 g flour ¼ lb/112 g lardons - I used 6-oz. blanched lardons ½ lb/ 225 g small, white button mushrooms, stems removed 12 pearl onions, peeled - I used 1 cup thawed, frozen pearl onions pinch of sugar Directions: 1) The day before beginning to cook, combine the bottle of red wine, the diced onion, sliced carrots, celery, cloves, peppercorns, and bouquet garni in a large deep bowl. Add the chicken and submerge it in the liquid so that all of it is covered. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. 2) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat it dry. Put it aside. Strain the marinade through the fine strainer, reserving the liquids and solids separately. Season the chicken with salt and pepper inside and out. In the large Dutch oven, heat the oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter until almost smoking, and then sear the chicken, turning it with the tongs to evenly brown it. Once browned, it should be removed from the pot and set it aside again. Add the reserved onions, celery, and carrot to the pot and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and mix well with the wooden spoon so that the vegetables are coated. Now stir in the reserved strained marinade. Stir in tomato paste. Put the chicken back in the pot, along with the bouquet garni. Add thick chicken broth to cover chicken. Bring to a simmer; cover pot and bake for 1 hour and ten minutes. 3) While chicken braises in oven, cook the bacon lardons in the small sauté pan over medium heat until golden brown. Remove the bacon from the pan and drain it on paper towels, making sure to keep about 1 tablespoon/14 g of fat in the pan. Saute the mushroom tops in the bacon fat until golden brown. Set them aside. Now, in the small saucepan, combine the pearl onions, the pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and 2tablespoons/28 g of butter. Add just enough water to just cover the onions; then cover the pan with the parchment paper trimmed to the same size of the pan. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until the water has evaporated. Keep a close eye on it. Remove the paper cover and continue to cook until the onions are golden brown. Set the onions aside and add the remaining cup/225 ml of red wine along with salt and pepper and reduce over medium-high heat until thick enough to coat the back of the spoon. 4) When the chicken is cooked through – meaning tender, the juice from the thigh running clear when pricked – carefully remove from the liquid, cut into quarters, and arrange on the deep serving platter. Strain the cooking liquid (again). Return to a pan and cook until sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon. Add reduced red wine. Add the bacon, mushrooms, and pearl onions, adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons/28 g of butter. Pour sauce over the chicken. Yield: 4 servings.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

Joao and I went to Sao Paulo’s Mercado Municipal last weekend – the one Anthony Bourdain visited in one episode of “No Reservations” ; btw, I’ve read he said some mean things about the city. I hope he never comes back, thank you very much. Mercado Municipal is a very traditional market, full of lots of types of food and ingredients, but it was my first time there. I went crazy with all the spices, nuts, fruits and veggies, cheese, olives... I got home with several new ingredients to cook and bake with. And an emptier wallet, too. :) My first choice was some delicious dried apples I’d bought there– they were so good I was glad there was a lot more than the amount called for in the recipe. :) I found these bars here and used a different pan to make them. Make sure you use a warm knife to slice the bars, so you won't mess up the topping like I did. Toffee apple shortbreads from Delicious magazine Shortbread base: 110g unsalted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing 40g caster sugar 175g all-purpose flour 10g cornstarch Filling/topping: 100g dried ready-to-eat apples, finely sliced 450g firm dulce de leche* 200g dark chocolate, chopped and divided Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF. Grease and line a square 20cm (8in) baking pan, leaving some paper hanging out of the pan on at least two sides (it will make unmolding easier). To make the shortbread base, cream the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Sift in the flour and cornstarch and, using a rubber spatula, then your hands, work to a dough. Place in the pan and use your fingertips to roll out flat and into the corners – if you have much too warm hands you might try it with the back of a spoon, lightly dusted with flour. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden. Set aside to cool.Scatter the apples over the cookie base, spread over the dulce de leche and level out. Chill in the fridge for 1 hour.Melt 150g of the chocolate in a glass bowl over barely simmering water. Remove the bowl from the pan and quickly wipe the water with a kitchen tower – no water should be in contact with the chocolate. Add the remaining 50g of chocolate and beat well to melt it. Pour the melted chocolate over the caramel and apples, then spread evenly. Set aside to cool at room temperature for about 2 hours or until set. Remove from the pan and cut into squares. * you can warm the dulce de leche into pouring consistency prior to adding it to the cookie base. Makes 16 squares

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

I've never visited the East Coast, so I'm not sure what makes this lasagna "East Coast Lasagna." But that's what Rory Freedman and Kim Bourdain call it in Skinny Bitch in the Kitch . East coast, west coast, whatever. This stuff was incredible! And super simple. That melty goodness all over the top is Teese, of course. Under that is the Skinny Bitch Basic Red Sauce, made with crushed tomatoes, fresh herbs, garlic, red wine, hot sauce, and agave nectar. In true Skinny Bitch fashion, I used brown rice pasta lasagna noodles (because white pasta is nasty). The noodles were covered in alternating layers of red sauce, Teese, homemade tofu ricotta, and Morningstar Farms veggie burger crumbles. As you can see, I have a problem "plating" lasagna, but I swear it tasted way better than it looks. I believe this was the first time I've made lasagna with burger crumbles. I usually use eggplant or spinach or something veggie-ish. But this was a nice stand-in for the old meat lasagna I used to love as a kid. Only way healthier. And minus the cruelty.

Source: vegancrunk.blogspot.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I wanted to post this recipe on the odd chance you have not yet tried Maida Heatter's Chocolate Mint Brownies. While they are delicious at any time, their layer of mint cream makes them especially appropriate for the St.Patrick's Day holiday. This is a layered treat. It begins with a dense fudgy brownie that is covered with peppermint cream and then coated with a gleaming, dark chocolate glaze. The peppermint cream can, of course, be tinted for those who wear the green and love overt symbols of the holiday. Brownies are one of the easiest dessert that can be made in our kitchens. They rarely require special equipment and this recipe can be made with a couple of bowls and a wooden spoon. Despite the ease with which these can be made, I promise you they are delicious. Just don't overbake them. While these can be made several days ahead of serving, they lose their sheen when refrigerated. I love the chocolate-mint combination and use it often. It works especially well here. If you need a dessert for St. Patrick's Day, I think you'll love this one. Here's the recipe. Double Chocolate Mint Brownies ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Maida Heatter Ingredients: Brownie Layer 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cut into pieces 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, coarsely chopped 1-1/4 cups granulated white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt Mint Layer 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup confectioners' sugar, sifted 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon pure peppermint extract or 1 to 2 tablespoons creme de menthe Green food coloring (optional) Chocolate Glaze 3 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F and place the rack in the center of the oven. 2) Line a 9 x 9-inch pan with aluminum foil, covering bottom and two opposite sides of pan. Foil is used to lift brownies from pan. Set aside. 3) In a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water, melt butter and chocolate. Remove from heat and stir in sugar and vanilla extract. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well with a wooden spoon after each addition. Stir in flour and salt and beat, with a wooden spoon, until batter is smooth and glossy and comes away from sides of pan (about one minute). Pour batter evenly into prepared pan. Bake in preheated oven for about 25 minutes or until brownies start to pull away from the sides of pan and the edges of brownies are just beginning to brown. A toothpick inserted in center of brownies will come out almost clean. Remove from oven and place on a rack to completely cool. 4) To make mint layer, combine butter, confectioners' sugar, heavy cream, peppermint extract in a small bowl and beat until smooth. Add a few drops of green food coloring if you wish. If frosting is too thick, add a little extra cream. (Frosting should be just thin enough to spread.) Spread frosting evenly over cooled brownie layer. Place in refrigerator for about 5-10 minutes, or until firm. 5) To make chocolate glaze, melt chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Spread over mint filling and refrigerate for about 30 minutes or until chocolate glaze starts to dull. 6) To serve, remove brownies from pan by lifting with ends of foil and transfer to a cutting board. With a sharp knife, cut into 30 squares. These brownies can be refrigerated for several days or else frozen. Yield: 30 squares. You might also enjoy these recipes: Chocolate Mint Brownies - David Lebovitz Salted Fudge Brownies - Verses from My Kitchen Peanut Butter Brownies - Being Suzy Homemaker Cakey Chocolate Brownies - Cookerati Chocolate Brownie - The Purple Foodie Quick and Easy Mocha Fudge Brownies - The Perfect Pantry Oreo Brownies with Buttercream Frosting - Love from the Oven Pecan Caramel Fudge Brownies - The Art of Baking Hot Chocolate Brownies - Sugar Plum Chocolate Cheesecake Brownie - Almost Bourdain Kahlua Brownies - Simply Recipes Iced Butterscotch Brownies - Culinary in the Dessert Mexican Chocolate Brownies - One Perfect Bite Bittersweets:The Ultimate Brownie - One Perfect Bite Red Velvet Cheesecake Brownies - Baking Bites

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

What Les Halles is the Recipes to Rival challenge of the month? It's Anthony Bourdain's version of coq au vin. He describes this dish as "an old, tough bird that you have to drown in wine to get to taste good." Unfortunately, there's more to it than that. There are several disparate steps to this recipe. There is, of course, the braising of the chicken, but the completed dish is enhanced by separate preparations of onions and mushrooms that require special care. The end product can be quite lovely. My problem? My culinary skills, whatever they are, were honed in the 70's and early 80's of the last century. That means I've made a lot of coq au vin and have some very firm opinions as to how it should be prepared. The hard part was keeping my changes to a minimum and preparing the recipe as it was written. I think I did fairly well. Change number one; the recipe called for a stewing hen. Local butchers laughed at me, so I used a 3-1/2 pound free range chicken. Change number two; I substituted a good shiraz for the burgundy wine that's normally used because I prefer to drink shiraz. Change number three; I added a quantity of thick (almost jelly-like) chicken stock to cover the chicken as it braised. Change number four; I increased the amount of bacon used in the recipe to 6-ounces, but blanched the lardons before adding them to the pot. Change number five; I used thawed, frozen pearl onions instead of fresh. My family can deftly move onions from one side of the plate to another before burying them under chicken bones, so the onions are just for show and I refuse to kill myself preparing them. Change number six; I added 1 tablespoon of tomato paste to kill the purple color of the wine that caused the chicken to look black and blue. I also reduce the sauce by half before napping the chicken and vegetables. Technically, when a young chicken is used to replace the stewing hen the dish should be called braised chicken, not coq au vin. I'll never forget how the use of a young bird offended Andre Soltner when he judged a Top Chef episode. If you have time and would like to prepare coq au vin in the classical manner, you'll love this recipe. It is delicious, but it does take time that includes a 24 hour marination. My changes can be identified by red print. The original recipe can be found at Recipes to Rival . This months challenge is being hosted by founders Temperance of High on the Hog and Lori of Lipsmacking Goodness . Coq au Vin from the Les Halles Cookbook, by Anthony Bourdain Ingredients: 1 bottle/1 liter plus 1 cup/225 ml of red wine - I used Rosemont shiraz 1 onion, cut into a 1-inch/2.5 cm dice 1 carrot, cut into ¼-inch/6-mm slices 1 celery rib, cut into ½ inch/1-cm slices 4 whole cloves 1 tbs/14 g whole black peppercorns 1 bouquet garni - a bay leaf, 3 sprigs of thyme and 4 sprigs parsley tied in a large coffee filter 1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 to 3 cups reduced chicken stock 1 whole chicken, about 3.5 lb/1.35 kg, “trimmed” – meaning guts, wing tips and neckbone removed salt and freshly ground pepper 1 tbs/28 ml olive oil 6 tbs/75 g butter, softened 1 tbs/14 g flour ¼ lb/112 g lardons - I used 6-oz. blanched lardons ½ lb/ 225 g small, white button mushrooms, stems removed 12 pearl onions, peeled - I used 1 cup thawed, frozen pearl onions pinch of sugar Directions: 1) The day before beginning to cook, combine the bottle of red wine, the diced onion, sliced carrots, celery, cloves, peppercorns, and bouquet garni in a large deep bowl. Add the chicken and submerge it in the liquid so that all of it is covered. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. 2) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat it dry. Put it aside. Strain the marinade through the fine strainer, reserving the liquids and solids separately. Season the chicken with salt and pepper inside and out. In the large Dutch oven, heat the oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter until almost smoking, and then sear the chicken, turning it with the tongs to evenly brown it. Once browned, it should be removed from the pot and set it aside again. Add the reserved onions, celery, and carrot to the pot and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and mix well with the wooden spoon so that the vegetables are coated. Now stir in the reserved strained marinade. Stir in tomato paste. Put the chicken back in the pot, along with the bouquet garni. Add thick chicken broth to cover chicken. Bring to a simmer; cover pot and bake for 1 hour and ten minutes. 3) While chicken braises in oven, cook the bacon lardons in the small sauté pan over medium heat until golden brown. Remove the bacon from the pan and drain it on paper towels, making sure to keep about 1 tablespoon/14 g of fat in the pan. Saute the mushroom tops in the bacon fat until golden brown. Set them aside. Now, in the small saucepan, combine the pearl onions, the pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and 2tablespoons/28 g of butter. Add just enough water to just cover the onions; then cover the pan with the parchment paper trimmed to the same size of the pan. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until the water has evaporated. Keep a close eye on it. Remove the paper cover and continue to cook until the onions are golden brown. Set the onions aside and add the remaining cup/225 ml of red wine along with salt and pepper and reduce over medium-high heat until thick enough to coat the back of the spoon. 4) When the chicken is cooked through – meaning tender, the juice from the thigh running clear when pricked – carefully remove from the liquid, cut into quarters, and arrange on the deep serving platter. Strain the cooking liquid (again). Return to a pan and cook until sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon. Add reduced red wine. Add the bacon, mushrooms, and pearl onions, adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons/28 g of butter. Pour sauce over the chicken. Yield: 4 servings.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

War Remnants museum, is a place to understand how Vietnamese peoples went through during Vietnam war. Photo of " napalm girl ", you can read more here .. Reunification Palace During our visit, there was a Canon's photography exhibition, many awesome photos were display here.. Frankly, nothing much to see inside here actually.. The green surrounding outside has better view  I just wonder how they manage these electric wires.. Ben Thanh market  The main purpose to visit Ben Thanh market was to get some "Fu' and "Hi" chops , you can get these type of chop at the stall where they selling all kind of bakery items.. I feel this shop given more reasonable price if compare to others ... Revisit to Ashima - mushroom hot pot, you may check my old post here Ashima 35A Nguyen Dinh Chieu, Dist 1, HCMC. Tel: 848 3824 1966 Every time I told my daughter and mother how good was this mushroom hotpot, and told them one day I will bring them to try out..This time I keep my promise, bring them to try out.. We went to the old place, but realized that they have actually shifted to somewhere else. Luckily we found their new place..  Many types of mushroom to choose from.. We still prefer to order beef slices to go with mushroom hotpot. My kids and mother were really enjoyed this hotpot. But my husband and I feel the taste somehow not that good anymore.. Anyway, if you have never tasted mushroom hotpot before (I haven't see this type of restaurant here), this is still a place to try out.. Captured this photo when we were on the way to try out Banh Xeo..normal to see this type of scene in Ho Chi Minhwith many peoples on motorcycle.. Banh Xeo 46A 46A D Dinh Cong Trang | District 3 , Ho Chi Minh City , Vietnam  A Banh Xeo place that made famous by Anthony Bourdain (No reservation) , you can watch the video here .. Learnt a tip from here, pour out the excess batter so you can have thin and crispy Banh Xeo.. Dipping sauce and veggie to go with Banh Xeo Ya, their Banh Xeo was really crispy but a bit oily. If I look at my Banh Xeo , i think I have added too much of turmeric powder as its look too yellow.  We also ordered this deep fried soft shell crabs and authentic Vietnamese coffee.. I went to this wet market, but sorry i couldn't recall the name.. French bread is so common here, even you can find it at wet market.. I bought pumpkin flowers from here, to make stuffed pumpkin flowers  My mother bought this Thien Ly Xao Bo (Thousand miles flowers) At the end of the street at this market, turned left and you can find two shops selling bakery ingredients (located at the 1st floor), where you can get the chops here too..at fixed and reasonable price.. Phuong Ha at 58 Ham Nghi St., District 1  Cuc Gach Quan 10 Dang Tat, Ward Tan Dinh, District 1, Saigon Tel: (84.8) 38 48 01 44 // (84) 01 657 10 10 10 - A new discovery of eating place after saw Esther's review.. This restaurant also made famous by Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt when they brought their adopted children back to Vietnam as to let them get to know their country where they were born.  kitchen area.. their old collections.. A very thick menu , like a book.. Use kangkong stem (water morning-glory) as a straw, something very new to me. very interesting ^_^ Anyway, the price for a fruit juices like this is almost equal to a plate of dish..rather expensive!! Everything we ordered were very delicious. I will be back to this restaurant if i will re-visit HCM again.. When my mother saw all these broken bowls and plates that they used., she said "Choy Choy, for Chinese only beggar use broken bowls", LOL..I told her that this is new fashion ,hehehe.. End of my update..Thanks for dropping by..

Source: nasilemaklover.blogspot.com

2 lbs pork belly, cut into 2 in cubes (5 cm) 1 lb pork shoulder, cut into 2 in cubes (5cm) 4 cups water 1 bouquet garni (1 sprig flat parsley, 2 sprigs of fresh thyme, 1 bay leaf -all tied with a string so its easy to ret) 1 teaspoon salt 1 pinch black pepper 1 lb pork fat, cut into thin slices 1 Place the pork belly and shoulder in a heavy bottomed pot. Add water and the bouquet garni and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally. 2 After 6 hours, stir in the salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Discard the bouquet garni. 3 Once the meat is cooled enough to handle, transfer it to a mixing bowl, using forks, shred the meat (not mush, SHREDS is the key) 4 Shovel some still warm pork into your mouth -- you know you want to. 5 Divide the mixture among several small containers. Top each portion with a slice or two of pork fat to completely cover it, fold the mixture together a bit then wrap each container in plastic wrap. 6 Place in the refrigerator and let them sit for 3 days before serving. Don't cheat on the 3 days because it just gets better as the flavors marry up!

Source: food.com

6 tablespoons butter 1 onion , thinly sliced 12 ounces button mushrooms , halved 4 cups chicken stock 1 sprig parsley 2 ounces sherry wine salt and pepper 1 Over medium heat, melt two tablespoons of the butter in a saucepan. Toss in the onion and cook until soft but not browned. 2 Toss in the remaining butter and then add the mushrooms. Cook for 8 minutes. 3 Pour in the chicken stock, add the parsley, and bring to a boil. When bubbling, reduce to a simmer and cook for an hour. 4 Pour soup into a blender (you might need to do this in stages), and process until smooth. Return to the saucepan and bring to a simmer. Pour in the sherry, and season with salt and pepper.

Source: food.com

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