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It doesn’t take a lot to inspire me. Especially when it’s food related. After receiving some great inspiration from the latest Jamie Oliver cookbooks , my attention has turned to the Middle East . Many years ago whilst holidaying in London I visited a restaurant in Notting Hill by the name of Ottolenghi . The moment I entered into this eatery I knew I was in a safe place! It was a visual display of glorious pastries, sweets and colourful salads. I was mesmerised (and so were the taste buds) by the simplicity of the food and how beautiful the produce was treated. Fast forward a few years later and Yotam Ottolenghi has released a new cook book called Jerusalem: A Cookbook . On top of that there is a TV show called “ Ottolenghi’s Meditteranean Feast ” and it’s been fascinating to watch. My mouth hasn’t stopped drooling. All it took was for me to watch that first episode and all of a sudden my kitchen was transformed into a Middle Eastern spice bazaar ! Which brings me to today’s recipe. I did a Greek version of stuffed eggplants called “ papoutsakia ” last year but this time I tried something new. I stuffed (or should that be spooned) them with some cooked Israeli couscous . The original recipe called for bulgur but I think the recipe was flexible enough to play around with. There’s a little parsley and mint for flavouring and it gets topped with yoghurt and sprinkled with sumac. Speaking of sumac, I can’t belive I’m late to the party with this spice! I’ve been putting it in nearly everything lately! What I did forget were the raisins and slivered almonds! I added it after I shot these pics. No matter. It was still good. As you can see I’ve paired this with some grilled lamb cutlets that I brushed lightly with pomegranate molasses and served these up with some “fasolakia” a.k.a Greek style braised beans . This is my kind of eating! A little bit of this and a little bit of that. I’m very much a grazer! My friend calls this feasting. I call it delicious! Enjoy! 5.0 from 7 reviews Israeli CousCous stuffed Eggplants Print Prep time 20 mins Cook time 35 mins Total time 55 mins Eggplants are baked and then stuffed with Israeli couscous. Adapted from the eggplant recipe in this article here Author: Peter G Recipe type: Main Cuisine: Middle Eastern Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp ground coriander ½ tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp ground cumin 3-4 eggplants, cut into 1 cm slices olive oil 1 cup cooked Israeli pearl couscous a handful chopped mint a handful chopped flat leaf parsley a handful chopped coriander (cilantro) ½ cup raisins ½ cup slivered almonds olive oil lemon juice salt and pepper to taste Greek yoghurt to serve sumac for garnish Instructions Pre heat your oven to 180 deg C. Combine the ground turmeric, coriander, cinnamon and cumin in a bowl. Drizzle the eggplants with some olive oil and and rub each with some of the spice mixture. Cook in the oven till eggplants have softened (approx 30-35 mins). Allow to cool a little before stuffing with couscous. Combine the cooked couscous, herbs, raisins and slivered almonds along with some olive oil and lemon juice and stir to combine. Season and adjust flavours to your liking. Spoon one heaped tbsp of the couscous mixture into each eggplant piece, dollop with Greek yoghurt and sprinkle some sumac. Serve immediately. Notes The dish is best served at room temperature or just warmed. Use the herbs as a guide and adjust them, according to your own taste. 3.2.1737   Related Stories Hazelnut Meal and Chocolate Cake Tequila and Lime Marinated Steak Blueberry & Coconut Buttermilk Bread

Source: souvlakiforthesoul.com

The posters for “Nymphomaniac” were released days ago and everyone is talking about them; I have zero interest in watching the movie because I did not like “Antichrist” and “Melancholia”. Many people I know tell me I should watch “Dancer in the Dark” because they’re sure I would love it but I really don’t feel like it – those other two movies made me quit Lars Von Trier, if not for good, for a real long time. The same happened with Michael Haneke – I felt so sick and miserable after watching “Funny Games U.S.” that up to this day I haven’t watched “Amour” yet – and several people I know have told me that the movie is great and that they’re sure I would love it, but I guess I’ll wait another couple of years to do that as I have the feeling I’ll cry my eyes out with Emmanuelle Riva. While I’ll avoid those directors’ films like the plague, there are others whose work drawn me immediately (can’t wait to watch “Girl Gone” and “The Wolf of Wall Street”, for example). And when it comes to baking the feeling is the same: I shy away from Jamie Oliver’s baking recipes most of times ( that banana bread scarred me for life ), while I’ll gladly try any recipe by Martha Stewart – they work every time and taste great. Here, I’ve paired Martha’s lemon cake with another baking force’s frangipane filling, the amazing Flo Braker, and it was a match made in food heaven: the cake turned out delicious and moist. One piece of advice, though: just make sure both the bowl you’re mixing the batter in and the Bundt pan are big enough because this cake is huge . :) Frangipane ripple lemon cake adapted from two great sources: Martha Stewart's Cakes and Baking for All Occasions Frangipane filling: 1/3 cup (33g) almond meal ½ cup almond paste – I used homemade, recipe here ¼ cup (50g) granulated sugar 1 large egg ¼ cup (56g) unsalted butter, softened Cake: 3 cups (420g) all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon table salt 1 cup (226g/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature 2 ¼ cups (450g) granulated sugar finely grated zest of 3 large lemons 1/3 cup (80ml) fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 tablespoons limoncello (optional; if using, add another tablespoon of flour to the 3 cups listed on the recipe) 6 large eggs 1 cup sour cream* confectioners' sugar, for dusting Make the filling: in a food processor, combine the almond meal, almond paste and sugar and process until well mixed. Add the egg and butter and process until smoothly blended. Cover and refrigerate while you make the cake batter (my food processor is broken, so I made the filling using an electric mixer). Now, the cake: preheat oven to 180°C/350°C. Butter and flour a standard 12-cup Bundt pan. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt; set aside. Using an electric mixer, beat butter, granulated sugar and zest on medium-high until light and fluffy, 4 to 5 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition; mix in lemon juice, vanilla and limoncello (if using). With mixer on low, alternately add flour mixture in three parts and sour cream in two, beginning and ending with flour mixture; mix just until incorporated (do not overmix). Remove the frangipane from the refrigerator. Spoon about 2 cups of the cake batter into the prepared pan, spreading it evenly. Spoon half of the frangipane in dollops over the center of the batter, and then spread it over the cake batter avoiding the center tube and sides of the pan. Spoon half of the remaining batter evenly over the filling. Spoon the remaining frangipane over the batter, spreading it evenly. Spread the remaining batter over the top and spread evenly. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean, 55-60 minutes (if cake browns too quickly, tent loosely with aluminum foil). Let cake cool in pan 20 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to cool completely. (To store, wrap cake in plastic, and keep at room temperature, up to 3 days.) Dust with confectioners' sugar before serving. * homemade sour cream: to make 1 cup of sour cream, mix 1 cup (240ml) heavy cream with 2-3 teaspoons lemon juice in a bowl. Whisk until it starts to thicken. Cover with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature for 1 hour or until thicker (I usually leave mine on the counter overnight – except on very warm nights – and it turns out thick and silky in the following morning; refrigerate for a creamier texture) Serves 10-12

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

3 cups self-rising flour 14 tablespoons butter 1 bunch fresh tarragon , finely chopped sea salt & freshly ground black pepper milk 1/2 a nutmeg 1 To make the dumplings, rub together the flour, butter, and tarragon with a dash of salt and pepper. Stir in enough milk to give you an unsticky, stiff dough. Knead together, then roll into a large snake. Cut into 18 equal sized pieces and roll into balls. Place on a sheet, and sprinkle nutmeg over the top. Move the tray to the fridge. 2 Heat a deep, ovenproof dish about a foot in diameter with a bit of olive oil and the knob of butter in the bottom, over medium-high heat. Coat the rabbit pieces in flour and shake off any excess. Put half the rabbit pieces in the pot and cook about 5 minutes until golden all over. Take those pieces out and cook the other pieces. Once they’re all cooked, add the first pieces back, as well as a big pinch of salt and pepper and the bacon. Cook until the bacon has crisped. Add the rosemary, mushrooms and onions and fry another ten minutes. 3 Mix in a tablespoon of flour then pour in the chicken stock and beer. Cover and simmer for half an hour. 4 Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. 5 Place the dumplings on top of the stew, about half an inch apart. Drizzle them with olive oil and bake for 45 minutes.

Source: food.com

1 (5 1/2 lb) sirloin beef , French trimmed sea salt & freshly ground black pepper olive oil 3 red onions , halved 2 heads garlic , plus 4 garlic cloves , peeled 7 lbs roasting potatoes , peeled 3 fresh rosemary sprigs 2 inches piece gingerroot , peeled and diced 0.5 (750 ml) bottle robust red wine 1 Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C), and heat a large thick-bottomed roasting tray on the stovetop. 2 Rub the beef generously with salt, then add a little olive oil to the tray and lightly color the meat for a couple of minutes on all sides. 3 Lay the onions and bulbs of garlic in the tray with the beef on top of them, then cook in the pre-heated oven for a total of 1 1/2 hours. 4 While the beef is roasting, parboil your potatoes in salted boiling water for around 10 minutes and drain in a colander. Toss about to chuff them up, this will make them really crispy. 5 After 30 minutes, take the tray out and toss in your potatoes and rosemary. With a garlic press or grater, squeeze or grate the cloves of garlic and ginger over everything in the tray. 6 Shake the tray and whack it back in the oven for the final hour. Remove the potatoes to a dish to keep warm, place the beef on a plate, covered with foil, to rest, and get your greens and Yorkshire puddings on. 7 Remove most of the fat from your roasting tray and you should be left with caramelized onions and sticky beef goodness. 8 Add 1 teaspoon of flour to the tray and mash everything together. Heat the tray on the stovetop and when hot, add the red wine. Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring every couple of minutes, until your gravy is really tasty and coats back of a spoon. Add any juice from the beef and feel free to add some water or stock to thin the gravy if you like. 9 Pour through a coarse sieve and push it through with a spoon, pushing it through with a spoon, and serve in a warmed gravy jug.

Source: food.com

150 g almonds, peeled 150 g walnuts , finely ground 300 g dark chocolate 1 teaspoon cocoa powder , heaped 255 g butter 100 g caster sugar 6 large eggs , separated salt 1 Preheat oven to 190c/375f/Gas 5. 2 Line the bottom of a 20 or 25cm/8 or 10" tin with a piece of greaseproof paper before buttering the bottom and sides, then dusting with flour. 3 Place the nuts into a food processor and whizz up until finely ground. 4 Add the chocolate and cocoa, and whizz for 30 seconds to break up the chocolate. 5 Put to one side in a separate bowl. 6 Add the butter and sugar to the food processor and beat until pale and fluffy. 7 At this point, add the egg yolks one at a time, then mix together with the chocolate and nuts. 8 In another bowl beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt, until they form stiff peaks. 9 Gently fold the egg whites into the chocolate, butter and nut mix. 10 Pour all the mixture into the tin. 11 Bake in the preheated oven for around an hour. 12 To test if the torte is cooked, insert a cocktail stick or the tip of a knife for five seconds. 13 When removed, it should be reasonably clean. 14 Serve with whipped cream, ice-cream or creme fraiche.

Source: food.com

2 teaspoons sea salt 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme 3 fresh sage leaves 1 garlic , peeled 1 lemon, rind of , grated 1 In a small chopper combine the ingredients and chop.

Source: food.com

250 g fresh fava beans 3 sprigs fresh coriander 6 mint leaves 1 pinch coarse salt 1 pinch fresh ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 small chili pepper , sliced (red) 2 teaspoons lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 1 teaspoon flour 8 mint leaves , chopped fine 1 cup yogurt 1/2 lemon, juice of coarse salt fresh ground black pepper 1 Combine beans, herbs, salt, pepper, cayenne, cumin, chili and lemon zest in food processor. Pulse until moderately smooth. Stir in flour (do not run processor!). 2 Heat 3" of vegetable oil in a pot to 375°F Using 2 tablespoons, make oval dumplings (quenelles) from the mixture, and drop into hot oil. Deep fry until dark golden brown. Drain briefly on kitchen paper and sprinkle lightly with salt. 3 Stir together mint, yogurt, lemon juice, salt and pepper. 4 Serve felafel with yogurt sauce and a lightly-dressed salad.

Source: food.com

1 lb mixed heirloom tomato, various colors 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1/2 tablespoon dried oregano 1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 tablespoon red wine vinegar 1/2 small fresh red chili pepper , deseeded and chopped finely (optional) 1/2 garlic clove , grated 1/2 lb fresh mozzarella cheese , ciliegine size (cherry size) 1 Cut tomatoes roughly into bite sized pieces. Toss into a colander. Sprinkle liberally with kosher salt. Toss well and allow to drain 15 minutes. 2 Transfer to a serving bowl. Add oregano, olive oil, vinegar, chili and garlic; toss well. Serve with mozzarella.

Source: food.com

1/2 lb mixed heirloom tomato, various colors 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1/2 small fresh red chili pepper , deseeded and chopped finely (optional) 1/2 garlic clove , grated 1 lb fusilli 1 teaspoon fresh oregano 1 teaspoon fresh basil , shredded by hand 1 Cut tomatoes roughly into bite sized pieces. Toss into a colander. Sprinkle liberally with kosher salt. Toss well and allow to drain 15 minutes. 2 Transfer to a serving bowl. Add oregano, olive oil, vinegar, chili and garlic; toss well. Marinate 15 minutes. Using your hands, squish up the tomatoes. 3 Meanwhile, prepare fusilli by adding to boiling salted water for 6-8 minutes or until cooked al dente. Drain well and add fusilli to tomatoes. Add fresh oregano and basil and serve.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 lb pancetta 2 lbs heirloom tomatoes, cored 5 fresh bay leaves or 2 dried bay leaves 2 tablespoons fresh oregano 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary 1 lb sausage 1 tablespoon olive oil 5 -6 garlic cloves 1 Preheat a roasting pan in a 350F (180C) oven. Add olive oil and pancetta; return to oven until pancetta is crispy. Push to one side and add herbs. 2 Put tomatoes into roasting pan, core hole down. Return to oven until tomato skins blister, about 5 minutes. Pinch off tomato skins. Toss carefully to keep tomatoes from falling apart. 3 Drizzle sausage with olive oil and rub in well. Place sausages into pan, pushing down amongst the tomatoes. Toss in garlic cloves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Return pan to oven for 1 hour, turning sausages once or twice. 4 Serve with crusty Italian bread, polenta or rice. Drizzle with a little high-quality balsamic vinegar.

Source: food.com

4 pork chops, about 1 1/2-inch thick salt black pepper 8 large fresh sage leaves 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 lemon, juice of 1 Score the fat at the edge of the chops at 1/2" intervals. Sprinkle both sides of each chop with salt and pepper. Stick a large sage leaf to the meat over the "eye" of the chop; press in firmly. 2 Pour olive oil into a hot non-stick skillet. Add chops, sage side down. Apply the remaining sage leaves to the now upper side of the chops. 3 Place skillet in a preheated 425F (220C) oven for 12-15 minutes, until golden brown, turning once half way through. Remove to a plate. 4 Pour fat out of pan. Deglaze with lemon juice and drizzle over chops.

Source: food.com

7 ounces green beans , trimmed 20 small cherry tomatoes 1/2 cup black olives , pits removed 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil kosher salt fresh ground black pepper 4 (8 ounce) salmon fillets , with or without skin, but with pin bones removed 2 lemons , quartered 1 cup fresh basil , loosely packed 12 anchovy fillets 1 Preheat oven to 350°F Place roasting pan in oven to heat. 2 Blanch the green beans in salted, boiling water until tender. Drain and place in a mixing bowl with the cherry tomatoes and olives. Add 2 tbsp olive oil and a pinch each of salt and pepper. 3 Rinse salmon fillets and pat dry with paper towels. Squeeze 1/2 lemon over fillets, dressing both sides; reserve the remaining lemons for garnish. Sprinkle both sides of fillets with salt and pepper, and drizzle both sides with remaining olive oil. 4 Toss basil into vegetables. Place salmon fillets at one end of hot roasting tray; place vegetables at the other end. Lay anchovy fillets over vegetables. Return pan to oven and roast for 10 minute Serve with reserved lemon quarters.

Source: food.com

1 liter chicken stock (or vegetable as appropriate) 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 shallots , finely chopped (or 2 medium onions) 1 head celery , finely chopped (discard any tough outer sticks) sea salt and black pepper 2 garlic cloves , finely chopped 400 g risotto rice 100 ml dry white vermouth or 100 ml dry white wine 70 g butter 100 g freshly grated parmesan cheese 1 Stage 1. 2 Heat the stock. 3 Then in a separate pan heat the olive oil add the shallot or onion celery and a pinch of salt and sweat the vegetables for about 3 minutes. 4 Add the garlic and after another 2 minutes when the vegetables have softened add the rice. 5 Turn up the heat now. 6 At this crucial point you can`t leave the pan and anyway this is the best bit. 7 While slowly stirring continuously you are beginning to fry the rice. 8 You don`t want any colour at any point (so remember you`re in control and if the temperature seems too high turn it down a bit). 9 You must keep the rice moving. 10 After 2 or 3 minutes it will begin to look translucent as it absorbs all the flavours of your base (it may crackle at this point that`s fine). 11 Add the vermouth or wine keeping on stirring as it hits the pan it will smelt fantastic! 12 It will sizzle around the rice evapourating any harsh alcohol flavours and leaving the rice with a tasty essence. 13 I must admit I`m a sucker for dry vermouth. When it cooks into the rice it seems to give it a really full but subtle flavour and leaves a wicked sweetness that works perfectly with the rice. White wine is lovely probably more delicate and fresh. 14 Try both see what you think. 15 Stage 2. 16 Once the vermouth or wine seems to have cooked into the rice add your first ladle of hot stock and a pinch of salt (add small amounts of salt to taste white you are adding the stock). 17 Turn down the heat to a highish simmer (the reason we don`t want to boil the hell out of it is because if we do the outside of the rice wilt be cooked and fluffy and the inside will be raw). 18 Keep adding ladlefuls of stock stirring and allowing each ladleful to be absorbed before adding the next. 19 This will take about 15 minutes. 20 Taste the rice is it cooked? 21 Carry on adding stock until the rice is soft but with a slight bite. 22 Check seasoning. 23 Stage 3. 24 Remove from the heat and add the butter and the Parmesan saving a little of the latter to go on top if you like. 25 Stir gently. 26 Eat it as soon as possible while it retains its moist texture. 27 Serve it on its own or with a crisp green salad and a hunk of crusty bread. 28 If you follow this recipe I promise you`ll be making some of the best risottos out. The real secret of a good risotto I`m afraid is that you have to stand over it and give it your loving and undivided attention for about 17 minutes but it`s worth it. The recipe is in stages; I am going to give you five of my favourite risottos all variants of this basic recipe. 29 To find a dry white wine, a good rule of thumb is the greater the alcohol %, the drier the wine.

Source: food.com

1 red pepper 1 medium red onion 2 chicken breasts , skinless 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 pinch ground cumin 2 limes olive oil sea salt black pepper , freshly ground 4 flour tortillas 150 ml sour cream 230 g guacamole 100 g cheddar cheese , grated 1 Put the griddle pan on high heat. 2 Halve and deseed the pepper and cut it into thin strips. 3 Peel, halve, and finely slice the onion. 4 Slice the chicken lengthways into long strips roughly the same size as your pepper strips. 5 Put the peppers, onion and chicken into a bowl with the paprika and cumin. 6 Squeeze over the juice of half a lime, drizzle with some olive oil, season with a pinch of salt and pepper and mix well. 7 Put to one side to marinate for 5 minutes or so while you make your salsa. 8 Finely chop the chilli. Roughly chop the tomatoes and the coriander, stalks and all. 9 Put the chilli and tomatoes into a second bowl with a good pinch of salt and pepper and the juice of 1 lime. Add some extra virgin olive oil, then stir in your chopped coriander. 10 Use a pair of tongs to put all the pieces of pepper, onion, and chicken into your preheated pan to cook for 6-8 minutes, until the chicken is golden and cooked through. 11 As the pan will be really hot, keep turning the pieces of chicken and vegetables over so they don't burn - you just want them to lightly chr grill to give you a lovely flavour. 12 Warm the tortillas up in the microwave or a warm dry pan. 13 Divide your warmed tortillas between the serving plates. 14 Halve the remaining lime and squeeze the juice over the sizzling chicken mixture. 15 Divide the chicken mixture beween the tortillas. 16 Top with cheese, salsa, and sour cream.

Source: food.com

5 1/2 kg turkey 2 -4 clementines rosemary , bay or fresh thyme sprig 150 g butter 2 -3 carrots 3 onions , peeled 2 celery ribs 1 For the Butter:. 2 You need to finely chop the carrots, onion and celery. Chop rosemary and thyme. 3 Mix into the butter thoroughly. 4 The Turkey:. 5 Using a tablespoon, gently seperate the skin from the meat through the cavity up towards the breastbone of the bird. 6 Once the skin is separated, take half of the flavoured butter and push in between the skin and the meat. Massage so that the butter is evenly distributed. 7 The other half of the butter is to be smoothed over the outside of the turkey. 8 Using a skewer or rosemary sprigs, secure the cavity, so that the skin doesn't slide. 9 Cover in cling film and keep in the refridgerator until ready to be cooked. 10 Before cooking, chop 2-4 clementines and place in the cavity. 11 Stuff the neck of the bird with as much stuffing as possible. 12 Cook the bird on 350 / Gas Mark 4. Time scale is approx 30 minutes per kilo, plus 20 minutes at the end. 13 For best results, baste the turkey every 45 minutes. 14 Enjoy.

Source: food.com

500 g plain flour 100 g lard 150 g butter salt 2 large eggs 1 Preheat the oven to 190° Celsius. 2 Rub together the flour and the fat. 3 Add the eggs and bring together carefully. 4 Chill in the refrigator for 1 hour. 5 Once your pastry has chilled roll it out to fit an 11-inch/28-centimeter tin with a removable bottom and bake it blind for 10 minutes. 6 Lower the oven temperatur to 180° Celsius. 7 Mix all the filling ingredients together then pour the filling into the pastry case. 8 Sprinkle over the goat's cheese, lay over the pancetta slices and then finish off with a drizzle of thyme oil. 9 Bake in the oven for 30 minutes.

Source: food.com

I have to start this text by confessing that it took me months (a quick look at Amazon shows me that I purchased the book in January, so almost a year) to make these cookies, all because I was a coward: I was afraid that all that rosemary in the dough would make the cookies taste weird. I am thirty- five six years old and rosemary scares the bejeesus out of me: I always think that the food will end up tasting like soap. :S I love cooking with herbs and will gladly add thyme, oregano, basil, marjoram, parsley, even cilantro to recipes without too much thought about it, for they make everything so much more delicious, but when it comes to rosemary I just can’t do it, and every time I watch Jamie Oliver adding tons of rosemary to his recipes I feel sort of desperate, my brain screams “it’s too much, too much!”. :) I decided it was time to stop this nonsense and bought a small vase of rosemary to gradually start using the herb in my cooking, and these cookies were my first attempt at getting to know the rosemary better: they turned out delicious, the herb flavor perfectly complimented by the orange. I feel a lot braver now. ;) Orange rosemary shortbread slightly adapted from the beautiful and delicious National Trust Simply Baking ½ cup (100g) granulated sugar 2 teaspoons finely chopped rosemary leaves finely grated zest of 2 oranges 1 cup (225g/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 340g all purpose flour pinch of salt Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F. Line two large baking sheets with baking paper. Put the sugar and rosemary in a food processor and whiz until the rosemary is very finely chopped. Transfer sugar to the bowl of an electric mixer, add the orange zest and rub them together with your fingertips until sugar is fragrant. Add the butter and vanilla and beat with the mixer until pale and creamy. On low speed, beat in flour and salt. Wrap the dough in plastic and refrigerate for 20 minutes. Roll out dough between two sheets of baking paper until 3mm thick. Use a 4cm (1½in) cookie cutter to cut out cookies – if the dough gets too soft, place it in the freezer for 5 minutes. Place cookies onto prepared sheets 2,5cm (1in) apart and prick them with a fork. Bake until lightly golden on the edges, 10-12 minutes. Cool completely on the sheets over a wire rack. Remove carefully from the paper. Makes about 60

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

I guess that when it comes to cooking and baking we all have our favorites - I certainly do, and the list includes Nigella, Jamie Oliver, Donna Hay and, of course, Martha: her baking recipes are always a hit and these cookies are no exception, delicious and dead easy to make. I got two logs of dough from this recipe and thought of keeping one in the freezer for another day, but after trying one of the cookies I knew I should bake as many as possible. :) Lady Grey tea cookies from one of my favorite cookbooks 2 cups (280g) all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons finely ground Lady Grey tea leaves (from about 4 bags)* ¼ teaspoon table salt 1 cup (226g/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened ½ cup (70g) confectioners' sugar, sifted finely grated zest of 1 large orange 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Whisk flour, tea, and salt in a small bowl; set aside. Put butter, sugar, orange zest and vanilla in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Reduce speed to low; gradually mix in flour mixture until just combined – at this point I tasted the dough and thought it wasn’t sweet enough, so I added 1 ½ tablespoons icing sugar. Divide the dough into two equal parts. Place each on a piece of parchment paper; shape dough into logs. Fold parchment over dough; using a ruler, roll and press into a 3.5 cm (1.4in) log – like Martha does here . Wrap in parchment. Chill in freezer until very firm. Preheat oven to 180°C/350°F; line two large baking sheets with baking paper. Unwrap one log at a time (keep the other in the freezer). Cut into 6mm (¼in) thick rounds; space 2.5cm (1in) apart onto prepared sheets. Bake, rotating sheets halfway through, until golden brown around the edges, about 15 minutes. Cool completely on the sheets over a wire rack. * I used this grinder to grind the tea leaves Makes about 50 cookies

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

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