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2 T fennel seeds 2 T cumin seeds 2 T coriander seeds 1/2 T fenugreek seeds 1/2 T black peppercorns 1 clove 1/2 cinnamon stick 2 cardamom pods 2 inches fresh ginger , peeled 2 tennis-ball-sized red onions, peeled 10 cloves of garlic , peeled 2 fresh red chiles w/seeds 1 bunch fresh cilantro 2 T butter 2 14-oz cans chopped tomatoes 1 cup stock or water one 3 1/2 leg of lamb , diced 1 handful chopped mint and cilantro 1 cup plain yogurt (nonfat is fine) salt and freshly ground black pepper lime juice to taste optional cayenne pepper Preheat your oven to 325. Lightly toast the first 8 ingredients in a dry pan over medium heat until they smell good and darken a few shades, then grind them in a coffee grinder. If you are using pre-ground spices, just toast those. Chop the ginger, onions, garlic, chiles, and cilantro roughly, then add the spice mix and puree in a food processor. In a large oven-proof casserole or Dutch Oven, fry the pureed mixture in the butter for a little bit, stirring regularly. Jamie Oliver says "until it goes golden" but mine never does. Add the tomatoes and stock or water. Bring to the boil, cover with the lid or foil and place in the oven for 1 1/2 hours to intensify the flavor. This is your basic curry sauce. If the sauce is still liquidy when it comes out of the oven, continue to simmer it on the stove until it thickens. If it is too thick add some more liquid. (note: if you are halving the recipe, don't halve the liquid or your curry might dry up in the oven.) Fry the lamb cubes in a little olive oil or cooking spray until golden, then add to the curry sauce and simmer for around 1 hour, until tender. You can vary the curry by using diced chicken, shrimp, tofu, or paneer instead of lamb. You can also toss in any kind of vegetable or legume you like towards the end of cooking. I did spinach and leftover boiled potatoes. Okra would be delicious. Sprinkle the curry with the chopped mint and cilantro. Stir in the yogurt, add a good squeeze of lime juice, and season to taste with salt, pepper, or a little cayenne if you like it spicy. Serve with Indian breads, basmati rice, and cold beer.

Source: cookeatshare.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite.. . The late August summers of my Chicago childhood moved in veiled slow-motion. Mirage-like waves rose from the steaming pavement and the incessant drone of cicadas slowed already weary bodies to a dirge like sway. Afternoons were spent under the sprinkler or reading beneath the rank trees-of-heaven that grew untended in the neighborhood. Boredom was a common malady that I escaped by venturing across the street to the Salvino's garden. When the tomatoes came in, the stamp-size plot and the kitchen of the bungalow teemed with activity as Mama S. and her sisters put-by the hundreds of jars that would be used for winter meals. Several of the sisters worked over an old starch stove that had been set up in the yard to contain the mess that came with blanching and skinning bushels of tomatoes. Another crew used the old stove in the basement to sterilize jars for canning, but the jars were filled upstairs in the blast furnace of a kitchen under Mama's watchful eye. The kitchen produced jar after jar of stewed tomatoes, tomato sauce and tomato paste, and, when lunch rolled around, everyone got to enjoy a marvelous Tuscan soup called pappa al pomodori. Mama called the soup tomato water. It contained the juice of sieved tomatoes, a handful of fresh basil, some onion and cubes of stale bread that were used to thicken the broth. I suspect that to those who have never sampled it, the soup sounds like prison fare, but, I promise you, that when it is freshly made, it is, unequivocally, delicious. There are scores of recipes for the soup. Jamie Oliver has one that is wonderful, but I prefer to use one that was developed by Mary Ann Esposito and featured on her program Ciao Italia . It's a hands down favorite for me, because of all the recipes I've found, it is the one most like the soup I first tasted as a child. This is a straightforward recipe and I know those of you who try it will enjoy this peasant favorite. It is important to use fully ripe, meaty, blood red tomatoes and good day-old bread when you put this together. This is a wonderful way to use summer's bounty and I hope you will give this soup a try. You can see Mary Ann make the recipe, here . I've included her recipe below. Here's how pappa al pomodori is made. Tuscan Tomato and Bread Soup - Pappa al Pomodori ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Mary Ann Esposito Ingredients: 2-1/2 pounds plum tomatoes, cored and cut in half 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/2 pound leeks, white bulb only, finely diced 12 basil leaves, minced 3 cups hot chicken or vegetable broth 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt Grinding black pepper 3 cups stale bread cut into 1-inch cubes Directions: 1) Puree tomatoes in a food processor until smooth. Pour mixture into a fine sieve placed over a large bowl. Strain juice by pressing down with a wooden spoon; discard seeds and skins. Set aside. 2) Heat 1/4 cup of olive oil in a large soup pot, stir in leeks and half the basil and cook until leeks soften. Stir in tomato juice, broth, salt, and pepper and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes. Cover pot and remove from hit. 3) Heat remaining olive oil in a large sauté pan. Stir in remaining basil and bread cubes. Brown bread quickly over medium heat. Stir cubes into soup. Cover the pan and allow bread to absorb liquid. 4) When ready to serve, slowly reheat the soup. Pass extra virgin olive oil to drizzle on top. Yield: 8 servings. One Year Ago Today: Pickles and Relish - A Round-Up Two Years Ago Today: Adam's Lime Curd Three Years Ago Today: Leche Asada

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

On Tuesday night, I taught my boyfriend Paul to make lasagna while we watched American Idol (go Lee DeWyze! yes, I'm that kind of nerd). Paul's not a vegan. In fact, he has the appetite of an overweight toddler — ridiculous amounts of fish sticks, Hamburger Helper, frozen TV dinners, pretzels, and ice cream. In Jamie Oliver style, I'm trying to teach Paul to cook whole foods from scratch. I realize convincing him to go vegan is still a far cry from reality, but I'd least like to wean him off of eating processed crap. Learning to cook is the first step, right? We each made our own pan of lasagna. Paul's had hamburger, ricotta, white pasta lasagna (the only kind he'll eat), marinara, and mozzarella. Here he is layering some noodles (sorry for the meat in the picture!) and acting like a goof. I promise he isn't cross-eyed in real life... Here I am (or at least, here's my hands) layering my pan — rice pasta lasagna, marinara, basil-tofu ricotta from Vegan with a Vengeance , spinach, and Follow Your Heart vegan mozzarella: I'll spare y'all the pictures of Paul's finished meaty lasagna, but believe me when I say that it turned out surprisingly prettier than mine. I gave him the proper rectangle lasagna pan, while I settled for the oval pan: My FYH cheeze totally liquified in the oven, so it looks a little funky but trust me when I say that it was amazingly delicious! This was my first time using the rice lasagna (you don't pre-boil it at all!), and though it took ages to cook (a whole hour!), it was worth it. I love the chewier texture of rice pasta over whole wheat. I'll probably stick with rice lasagna from now on. Here's a sloppily-plated serving of my vegan lasagna: Note: I added a little Daiya Italian Shreds to the top for this picture since the FYH melted off the top.

Source: vegancrunk.blogspot.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite.. . The late August summers of my Chicago childhood moved in veiled slow-motion. Mirage-like waves rose from the steaming pavement and the incessant drone of cicadas slowed already weary bodies to a dirge like sway. Afternoons were spent under the sprinkler or reading beneath the rank trees-of-heaven that grew untended in the neighborhood. Boredom was a common malady that I escaped by venturing across the street to the Salvino's garden. When the tomatoes came in, the stamp-size plot and the kitchen of the bungalow teemed with activity as Mama S. and her sisters put-by the hundreds of jars that would be used for winter meals. Several of the sisters worked over an old starch stove that had been set up in the yard to contain the mess that came with blanching and skinning bushels of tomatoes. Another crew used the old stove in the basement to sterilize jars for canning, but the jars were filled upstairs in the blast furnace of a kitchen under Mama's watchful eye. The kitchen produced jar after jar of stewed tomatoes, tomato sauce and tomato paste, and, when lunch rolled around, everyone got to enjoy a marvelous Tuscan soup called pappa al pomodori. Mama called the soup tomato water. It contained the juice of sieved tomatoes, a handful of fresh basil, some onion and cubes of stale bread that were used to thicken the broth. I suspect that to those who have never sampled it, the soup sounds like prison fare, but, I promise you, that when it is freshly made, it is, unequivocally, delicious. There are scores of recipes for the soup. Jamie Oliver has one that is wonderful, but I prefer to use one that was developed by Mary Ann Esposito and featured on her program Ciao Italia . It's a hands down favorite for me, because of all the recipes I've found, it is the one most like the soup I first tasted as a child. This is a straightforward recipe and I know those of you who try it will enjoy this peasant favorite. It is important to use fully ripe, meaty, blood red tomatoes and good day-old bread when you put this together. This is a wonderful way to use summer's bounty and I hope you will give this soup a try. You can see Mary Ann make the recipe, here . I've included her recipe below. Here's how pappa al pomodori is made. Tuscan Tomato and Bread Soup - Pappa al Pomodori ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Mary Ann Esposito Ingredients: 2-1/2 pounds plum tomatoes, cored and cut in half 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/2 pound leeks, white bulb only, finely diced 12 basil leaves, minced 3 cups hot chicken or vegetable broth 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt Grinding black pepper 3 cups stale bread cut into 1-inch cubes Directions: 1) Puree tomatoes in a food processor until smooth. Pour mixture into a fine sieve placed over a large bowl. Strain juice by pressing down with a wooden spoon; discard seeds and skins. Set aside. 2) Heat 1/4 cup of olive oil in a large soup pot, stir in leeks and half the basil and cook until leeks soften. Stir in tomato juice, broth, salt, and pepper and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes. Cover pot and remove from hit. 3) Heat remaining olive oil in a large sauté pan. Stir in remaining basil and bread cubes. Brown bread quickly over medium heat. Stir cubes into soup. Cover the pan and allow bread to absorb liquid. 4) When ready to serve, slowly reheat the soup. Pass extra virgin olive oil to drizzle on top. Yield: 8 servings. One Year Ago Today: Pickles and Relish - A Round-Up Two Years Ago Today: Adam's Lime Curd Three Years Ago Today: Leche Asada

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

Summer. Time for grilling. This easy as 1, 2, 3 recipe has been a summer family staple since I was a blushing bride, learning to grill fish. We won't talk about how many years ago that was, Dear Reader. I mean, the blushing bridal part. Let's just say my oldest son is 26 and leave it at that. So, you may ask- if you're a blushing bride yourself- how do you grill a slab of fresh fish and veggies all at once and have it turn out so tender and flaky and savory that your newly minted partner for life will turn to you and whisper, I knew I married the right girl? Or boy (I make no assumptions around here, goddess forbid). Well, here's a little secret I learned way back when. Back before cooking blogs and Food TV and Jamie Oliver . I learned it from a woman who liked my paintings. This is the only way to make fish, she told me. Trust me . I trust you, I answered. Now tell me your secret. Foil, she said. And onions, garlic and tomatoes. It's a Mediterranean style fish- not the typical butter and Ritz cracker crumbs you get around here (we were living on Cape Cod at the time). This is the real thing, she continued. Real food. Big flavor. You'll love it! And she was right. Here's my easy version of Mediterranean fish- grilled (or baked) with spinach, tomatoes, onions and garlic. I also added balsamic vinegar and fresh chopped herbs. Easy Mediterranean Fish Recipe in Foil Packets- Serve with Rice The fish I used this time was halibut. But any hefty white fish will do- cod, haddock, tilapia, or orange roughy would all be brilliant. Ingredients: 4 serving size fish fillets, rinsed and patted dry (about 1 1/2 pounds) A squeeze of fresh lemon juice Sea salt and fresh pepper 8 cloves of garlic, roughly chopped 2 red or sweet yellow onions, cut into pieces 4 cups baby spinach leaves- or chopped spinach 8 plum or Italian tomatoes, roughly chopped 4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley or cilantro A sprinkle of red pepper flakes, to taste Extra virgin olive oil, as needed Instructions: Fire up the grill to medium high heat. If you are cooking indoors, preheat the oven to 375ºF. Tear off a large sheet of aluminum foil and place it on a large platter or tray. Lay the fish fillets in the center, in a single layer. Squeeze a little lemon juice over the fillets. Season with sea salt and fresh pepper. In a large mixing bowl, combine the garlic, onion, baby spinach and tomatoes. Add the balsamic vinegar, fresh chopped herbs, red pepper flakes and toss to mix. Drizzle with enough extra virgin olive oil to moisten it all. Season with a little sea salt and pepper. Toss to coat. Tear off a second sheet of foil the same size as the bottom sheet. Turn up all the edges of the bottom sheet a bit to catch any liquid that runs to the edge. Spoon the spinach-tomato mixture on top of the fish. Drizzle on any remaining olive oil left in the bowl. Lay the second piece of foil on top of the fish and veggies and crimp the foil closed all around the edges to make a large packet. Carry the packet with the platter or tray to the grill and carefully transfer the packet to the preheated grill. Cover the grill and cook until the fish is done- about 20 minutes or so- depending on the thickness of the fillet, and how hot your fire is. The fish should flake easily with a fork, and appear opaque. Serve with hot cooked rice. I served mine with my tasty Spanish Brown Rice Bake recipe . Recipe Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you. Karina's Note for Gluten-Free Folks: This is a safe way for those with celiac disease or food allergies to eat at pot luck barbecues and picnics. Bring your own packets! Make single individual packets for each person to make it easy to share the grill with no danger of cross contamination. More (Fabulous!) Summer Grill Recipes From Food Bloggers: Kalyn's Kitchen: Grilled Salmon with Asian Dipping Sauce Cooking with Amy's Shrimp and Mango Kebabs Food Blogga's Grilled Watermelon Gluten-Free Bay's Grilled Chipotle Lime Chicken

Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

290 ml milk 115 g all-purpose flour 1 pinch salt 3 eggs 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 Mix all the ingredients, except the oil, to make a batter using an electric mixer. 2 Let it rest for 10 minutes. 3 Preheat oven at 450°F. 4 Preheat a muffin tray and grease with a little oil. 5 Divide the batter into the tray. 6 Cook for 20 minutes at 450°F.

Source: food.com

9 fluid ounces yoghurt 4 1/2 fluid ounces milk 3 fresh mango , cubed 4 teaspoons granulated sugar 1 Put all the ingredients into a blender and blend for 2 minutes, then pour into glasses and serve.

Source: food.com

1 (5 1/2 lb) sirloin beef , French trimmed sea salt & freshly ground black pepper olive oil 3 red onions , halved 2 heads garlic , plus 4 garlic cloves , peeled 7 lbs roasting potatoes , peeled 3 fresh rosemary sprigs 2 inches piece gingerroot , peeled and diced 0.5 (750 ml) bottle robust red wine 1 Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C), and heat a large thick-bottomed roasting tray on the stovetop. 2 Rub the beef generously with salt, then add a little olive oil to the tray and lightly color the meat for a couple of minutes on all sides. 3 Lay the onions and bulbs of garlic in the tray with the beef on top of them, then cook in the pre-heated oven for a total of 1 1/2 hours. 4 While the beef is roasting, parboil your potatoes in salted boiling water for around 10 minutes and drain in a colander. Toss about to chuff them up, this will make them really crispy. 5 After 30 minutes, take the tray out and toss in your potatoes and rosemary. With a garlic press or grater, squeeze or grate the cloves of garlic and ginger over everything in the tray. 6 Shake the tray and whack it back in the oven for the final hour. Remove the potatoes to a dish to keep warm, place the beef on a plate, covered with foil, to rest, and get your greens and Yorkshire puddings on. 7 Remove most of the fat from your roasting tray and you should be left with caramelized onions and sticky beef goodness. 8 Add 1 teaspoon of flour to the tray and mash everything together. Heat the tray on the stovetop and when hot, add the red wine. Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring every couple of minutes, until your gravy is really tasty and coats back of a spoon. Add any juice from the beef and feel free to add some water or stock to thin the gravy if you like. 9 Pour through a coarse sieve and push it through with a spoon, pushing it through with a spoon, and serve in a warmed gravy jug.

Source: food.com

250 g fresh fava beans 3 sprigs fresh coriander 6 mint leaves 1 pinch coarse salt 1 pinch fresh ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 small chili pepper , sliced (red) 2 teaspoons lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 1 teaspoon flour 8 mint leaves , chopped fine 1 cup yogurt 1/2 lemon, juice of coarse salt fresh ground black pepper 1 Combine beans, herbs, salt, pepper, cayenne, cumin, chili and lemon zest in food processor. Pulse until moderately smooth. Stir in flour (do not run processor!). 2 Heat 3" of vegetable oil in a pot to 375°F Using 2 tablespoons, make oval dumplings (quenelles) from the mixture, and drop into hot oil. Deep fry until dark golden brown. Drain briefly on kitchen paper and sprinkle lightly with salt. 3 Stir together mint, yogurt, lemon juice, salt and pepper. 4 Serve felafel with yogurt sauce and a lightly-dressed salad.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 lb pancetta 2 lbs heirloom tomatoes, cored 5 fresh bay leaves or 2 dried bay leaves 2 tablespoons fresh oregano 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary 1 lb sausage 1 tablespoon olive oil 5 -6 garlic cloves 1 Preheat a roasting pan in a 350F (180C) oven. Add olive oil and pancetta; return to oven until pancetta is crispy. Push to one side and add herbs. 2 Put tomatoes into roasting pan, core hole down. Return to oven until tomato skins blister, about 5 minutes. Pinch off tomato skins. Toss carefully to keep tomatoes from falling apart. 3 Drizzle sausage with olive oil and rub in well. Place sausages into pan, pushing down amongst the tomatoes. Toss in garlic cloves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Return pan to oven for 1 hour, turning sausages once or twice. 4 Serve with crusty Italian bread, polenta or rice. Drizzle with a little high-quality balsamic vinegar.

Source: food.com

2 lbs carrots 1/2 lb ground lamb 2 teaspoons garam masala kosher salt 3 shallots , finely minced 1 lemon, juice of 2 inches piece fresh ginger , peeled and grated 1 teaspoon whole cumin seed 3 -4 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon fresh coriander 1 teaspoon fresh mint 1 teaspoon sesame seeds 1 Shred carrots very thinly using a speed peeler. 2 Brown lamb in a hot non-stick skillet until quite crispy. Drain off most of the fat. Add garam masala and salt and toss well. 3 Combine shallots, lemon juice, ginger, salt in a large bowl. Toast cumin seeds in a hot, dry skillet. Grind with a mortar and pestle or spice grinder. Add to dressing. Add olive oil and pour dressing over carrots. Add coriander and mint and toss well. Serve on top of hot lamb and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Source: food.com

1/2 lb mixed heirloom tomato, various colors 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1/2 small fresh red chili pepper , deseeded and chopped finely (optional) 1/2 garlic clove , grated 1 tablespoon fresh coriander 1/2 lemon, juice of 1 Cut tomatoes roughly into bite sized pieces. Toss into a colander. Sprinkle liberally with kosher salt. Toss well and allow to drain 15 minutes. 2 Transfer to a serving bowl. Add oregano, olive oil, vinegar, chili and garlic; toss well. Marinate 15 minutes. 3 Roughly chop the tomatoes with the coriander. Stir in lemon juice. Serve with fish or chicken.

Source: food.com

4 pork chops, about 1 1/2-inch thick salt black pepper 8 large fresh sage leaves 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 lemon, juice of 1 Score the fat at the edge of the chops at 1/2" intervals. Sprinkle both sides of each chop with salt and pepper. Stick a large sage leaf to the meat over the "eye" of the chop; press in firmly. 2 Pour olive oil into a hot non-stick skillet. Add chops, sage side down. Apply the remaining sage leaves to the now upper side of the chops. 3 Place skillet in a preheated 425F (220C) oven for 12-15 minutes, until golden brown, turning once half way through. Remove to a plate. 4 Pour fat out of pan. Deglaze with lemon juice and drizzle over chops.

Source: food.com

1 red pepper 1 medium red onion 2 chicken breasts , skinless 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 pinch ground cumin 2 limes olive oil sea salt black pepper , freshly ground 4 flour tortillas 150 ml sour cream 230 g guacamole 100 g cheddar cheese , grated 1 Put the griddle pan on high heat. 2 Halve and deseed the pepper and cut it into thin strips. 3 Peel, halve, and finely slice the onion. 4 Slice the chicken lengthways into long strips roughly the same size as your pepper strips. 5 Put the peppers, onion and chicken into a bowl with the paprika and cumin. 6 Squeeze over the juice of half a lime, drizzle with some olive oil, season with a pinch of salt and pepper and mix well. 7 Put to one side to marinate for 5 minutes or so while you make your salsa. 8 Finely chop the chilli. Roughly chop the tomatoes and the coriander, stalks and all. 9 Put the chilli and tomatoes into a second bowl with a good pinch of salt and pepper and the juice of 1 lime. Add some extra virgin olive oil, then stir in your chopped coriander. 10 Use a pair of tongs to put all the pieces of pepper, onion, and chicken into your preheated pan to cook for 6-8 minutes, until the chicken is golden and cooked through. 11 As the pan will be really hot, keep turning the pieces of chicken and vegetables over so they don't burn - you just want them to lightly chr grill to give you a lovely flavour. 12 Warm the tortillas up in the microwave or a warm dry pan. 13 Divide your warmed tortillas between the serving plates. 14 Halve the remaining lime and squeeze the juice over the sizzling chicken mixture. 15 Divide the chicken mixture beween the tortillas. 16 Top with cheese, salsa, and sour cream.

Source: food.com

5 1/2 kg turkey 2 -4 clementines rosemary , bay or fresh thyme sprig 150 g butter 2 -3 carrots 3 onions , peeled 2 celery ribs 1 For the Butter:. 2 You need to finely chop the carrots, onion and celery. Chop rosemary and thyme. 3 Mix into the butter thoroughly. 4 The Turkey:. 5 Using a tablespoon, gently seperate the skin from the meat through the cavity up towards the breastbone of the bird. 6 Once the skin is separated, take half of the flavoured butter and push in between the skin and the meat. Massage so that the butter is evenly distributed. 7 The other half of the butter is to be smoothed over the outside of the turkey. 8 Using a skewer or rosemary sprigs, secure the cavity, so that the skin doesn't slide. 9 Cover in cling film and keep in the refridgerator until ready to be cooked. 10 Before cooking, chop 2-4 clementines and place in the cavity. 11 Stuff the neck of the bird with as much stuffing as possible. 12 Cook the bird on 350 / Gas Mark 4. Time scale is approx 30 minutes per kilo, plus 20 minutes at the end. 13 For best results, baste the turkey every 45 minutes. 14 Enjoy.

Source: food.com

500 g plain flour 100 g lard 150 g butter salt 2 large eggs 1 Preheat the oven to 190° Celsius. 2 Rub together the flour and the fat. 3 Add the eggs and bring together carefully. 4 Chill in the refrigator for 1 hour. 5 Once your pastry has chilled roll it out to fit an 11-inch/28-centimeter tin with a removable bottom and bake it blind for 10 minutes. 6 Lower the oven temperatur to 180° Celsius. 7 Mix all the filling ingredients together then pour the filling into the pastry case. 8 Sprinkle over the goat's cheese, lay over the pancetta slices and then finish off with a drizzle of thyme oil. 9 Bake in the oven for 30 minutes.

Source: food.com

I guess that when it comes to cooking and baking we all have our favorites - I certainly do, and the list includes Nigella, Jamie Oliver, Donna Hay and, of course, Martha: her baking recipes are always a hit and these cookies are no exception, delicious and dead easy to make. I got two logs of dough from this recipe and thought of keeping one in the freezer for another day, but after trying one of the cookies I knew I should bake as many as possible. :) Lady Grey tea cookies from one of my favorite cookbooks 2 cups (280g) all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons finely ground Lady Grey tea leaves (from about 4 bags)* ¼ teaspoon table salt 1 cup (226g/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened ½ cup (70g) confectioners' sugar, sifted finely grated zest of 1 large orange 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Whisk flour, tea, and salt in a small bowl; set aside. Put butter, sugar, orange zest and vanilla in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Reduce speed to low; gradually mix in flour mixture until just combined – at this point I tasted the dough and thought it wasn’t sweet enough, so I added 1 ½ tablespoons icing sugar. Divide the dough into two equal parts. Place each on a piece of parchment paper; shape dough into logs. Fold parchment over dough; using a ruler, roll and press into a 3.5 cm (1.4in) log – like Martha does here . Wrap in parchment. Chill in freezer until very firm. Preheat oven to 180°C/350°F; line two large baking sheets with baking paper. Unwrap one log at a time (keep the other in the freezer). Cut into 6mm (¼in) thick rounds; space 2.5cm (1in) apart onto prepared sheets. Bake, rotating sheets halfway through, until golden brown around the edges, about 15 minutes. Cool completely on the sheets over a wire rack. * I used this grinder to grind the tea leaves Makes about 50 cookies

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

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