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“You Don’t Own Me” PSA from You Don’t Own Me on Vimeo . I’ve been watching the recent presidential debates on Twitter. Well, I’ve been watching them on my TV, but following along on Twitter. The majority of folks I follow usually tweet about food. That changes for those few hours when the debate is taking place and suddenly everyone is talking politics. It is an odd phenomenon. It becomes especially odd when, during the debate, someone tweets about something not related to politics. During one of the debates, Chicago chef Rick Bayless tweeted: A Genius Mix on my iPhone: Black Eyed Peas, Justin Timberlake, Sound of Music & R Kelly from his Christmas album.Called Urban Crossover Which became unintentionally hilarious (though maybe that phrase is inherently funny?) in the middle of an impassioned series of tweets about election issues. Ruth Bourdain responded to Bayless with what everyone may have been thinking: WTF? It’s interesting, in part, because in the middle of a discussion about women’s rights, gay rights (well, sort of), war and the economy, tweets about food, music, or your crappy day seem particularly trite. It is also strange that these public discussions are relegated to two hour blocks of time every four years or so. There isn’t much integration. A similar, but opposite, phenomenon occurs when I write about something political in the middle of posts about food and entertaining, as I’ve been known to do. It seems somehow too serious, or like I’m a spoilsport. There is an expectation that these things remain separate, the political and the private. That doesn’t seem possible to me. How can I write about my wedding without it being political? I wish I could. Our kitchens are not free from politics and this blog never will be. My rights and the rights of millions of people are jeopardized or restricted by politicians and fellow citizens every day and those threats do not disappear when I enter my home or cook dinner or write these words. Here is the thing, I am able to enjoy cooking and keeping a home and writing about it because I currently feel somewhat secure in my role as citizen (as tenuous and unequal as that role may be). It is all connected. My investment in the current political moment is, in part, because my rights and the rights of others may be jeopardized by the Republican party. They (and other conservatives) have repeatedly demonstrated to me that they do not understand women, gay people, sick people, poor people, immigrants, or the environment—and it freaks me out. I alternate between feeling invisible and attacked. It doesn’t feel good. The video above is a lighthearted response to some extremely serious issues that are important to me. It features many of my favorite women, including some friends of L +D. It will fit awkwardly into this website, but not into my life; in the same way that politics sometimes fits awkwardly into dinner conversation, but is important. I stand with these women and with everyone else interested in progress. Go vote, friends. Permalink to i’m free and i love to be free | 51 comments so far

Source: lottieanddoof.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I wanted to post this recipe on the odd chance you have not yet tried Maida Heatter's Chocolate Mint Brownies. While they are delicious at any time, their layer of mint cream makes them especially appropriate for the St.Patrick's Day holiday. This is a layered treat. It begins with a dense fudgy brownie that is covered with peppermint cream and then coated with a gleaming, dark chocolate glaze. The peppermint cream can, of course, be tinted for those who wear the green and love overt symbols of the holiday. Brownies are one of the easiest dessert that can be made in our kitchens. They rarely require special equipment and this recipe can be made with a couple of bowls and a wooden spoon. Despite the ease with which these can be made, I promise you they are delicious. Just don't overbake them. While these can be made several days ahead of serving, they lose their sheen when refrigerated. I love the chocolate-mint combination and use it often. It works especially well here. If you need a dessert for St. Patrick's Day, I think you'll love this one. Here's the recipe. Double Chocolate Mint Brownies ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Maida Heatter Ingredients: Brownie Layer 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cut into pieces 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, coarsely chopped 1-1/4 cups granulated white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt Mint Layer 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup confectioners' sugar, sifted 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon pure peppermint extract or 1 to 2 tablespoons creme de menthe Green food coloring (optional) Chocolate Glaze 3 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F and place the rack in the center of the oven. 2) Line a 9 x 9-inch pan with aluminum foil, covering bottom and two opposite sides of pan. Foil is used to lift brownies from pan. Set aside. 3) In a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water, melt butter and chocolate. Remove from heat and stir in sugar and vanilla extract. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well with a wooden spoon after each addition. Stir in flour and salt and beat, with a wooden spoon, until batter is smooth and glossy and comes away from sides of pan (about one minute). Pour batter evenly into prepared pan. Bake in preheated oven for about 25 minutes or until brownies start to pull away from the sides of pan and the edges of brownies are just beginning to brown. A toothpick inserted in center of brownies will come out almost clean. Remove from oven and place on a rack to completely cool. 4) To make mint layer, combine butter, confectioners' sugar, heavy cream, peppermint extract in a small bowl and beat until smooth. Add a few drops of green food coloring if you wish. If frosting is too thick, add a little extra cream. (Frosting should be just thin enough to spread.) Spread frosting evenly over cooled brownie layer. Place in refrigerator for about 5-10 minutes, or until firm. 5) To make chocolate glaze, melt chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Spread over mint filling and refrigerate for about 30 minutes or until chocolate glaze starts to dull. 6) To serve, remove brownies from pan by lifting with ends of foil and transfer to a cutting board. With a sharp knife, cut into 30 squares. These brownies can be refrigerated for several days or else frozen. Yield: 30 squares. You might also enjoy these recipes: Chocolate Mint Brownies - David Lebovitz Salted Fudge Brownies - Verses from My Kitchen Peanut Butter Brownies - Being Suzy Homemaker Cakey Chocolate Brownies - Cookerati Chocolate Brownie - The Purple Foodie Quick and Easy Mocha Fudge Brownies - The Perfect Pantry Oreo Brownies with Buttercream Frosting - Love from the Oven Pecan Caramel Fudge Brownies - The Art of Baking Hot Chocolate Brownies - Sugar Plum Chocolate Cheesecake Brownie - Almost Bourdain Kahlua Brownies - Simply Recipes Iced Butterscotch Brownies - Culinary in the Dessert Mexican Chocolate Brownies - One Perfect Bite Bittersweets:The Ultimate Brownie - One Perfect Bite Red Velvet Cheesecake Brownies - Baking Bites

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

Joao and I went to Sao Paulo’s Mercado Municipal last weekend – the one Anthony Bourdain visited in one episode of “No Reservations” ; btw, I’ve read he said some mean things about the city. I hope he never comes back, thank you very much. Mercado Municipal is a very traditional market, full of lots of types of food and ingredients, but it was my first time there. I went crazy with all the spices, nuts, fruits and veggies, cheese, olives... I got home with several new ingredients to cook and bake with. And an emptier wallet, too. :) My first choice was some delicious dried apples I’d bought there– they were so good I was glad there was a lot more than the amount called for in the recipe. :) I found these bars here and used a different pan to make them. Make sure you use a warm knife to slice the bars, so you won't mess up the topping like I did. Toffee apple shortbreads from Delicious magazine Shortbread base: 110g unsalted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing 40g caster sugar 175g all-purpose flour 10g cornstarch Filling/topping: 100g dried ready-to-eat apples, finely sliced 450g firm dulce de leche* 200g dark chocolate, chopped and divided Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF. Grease and line a square 20cm (8in) baking pan, leaving some paper hanging out of the pan on at least two sides (it will make unmolding easier). To make the shortbread base, cream the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Sift in the flour and cornstarch and, using a rubber spatula, then your hands, work to a dough. Place in the pan and use your fingertips to roll out flat and into the corners – if you have much too warm hands you might try it with the back of a spoon, lightly dusted with flour. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden. Set aside to cool.Scatter the apples over the cookie base, spread over the dulce de leche and level out. Chill in the fridge for 1 hour.Melt 150g of the chocolate in a glass bowl over barely simmering water. Remove the bowl from the pan and quickly wipe the water with a kitchen tower – no water should be in contact with the chocolate. Add the remaining 50g of chocolate and beat well to melt it. Pour the melted chocolate over the caramel and apples, then spread evenly. Set aside to cool at room temperature for about 2 hours or until set. Remove from the pan and cut into squares. * you can warm the dulce de leche into pouring consistency prior to adding it to the cookie base. Makes 16 squares

Source: technicolorkitcheninenglish.blogspot.com

I've never visited the East Coast, so I'm not sure what makes this lasagna "East Coast Lasagna." But that's what Rory Freedman and Kim Bourdain call it in Skinny Bitch in the Kitch . East coast, west coast, whatever. This stuff was incredible! And super simple. That melty goodness all over the top is Teese, of course. Under that is the Skinny Bitch Basic Red Sauce, made with crushed tomatoes, fresh herbs, garlic, red wine, hot sauce, and agave nectar. In true Skinny Bitch fashion, I used brown rice pasta lasagna noodles (because white pasta is nasty). The noodles were covered in alternating layers of red sauce, Teese, homemade tofu ricotta, and Morningstar Farms veggie burger crumbles. As you can see, I have a problem "plating" lasagna, but I swear it tasted way better than it looks. I believe this was the first time I've made lasagna with burger crumbles. I usually use eggplant or spinach or something veggie-ish. But this was a nice stand-in for the old meat lasagna I used to love as a kid. Only way healthier. And minus the cruelty.

Source: vegancrunk.blogspot.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I wanted to post this recipe on the odd chance you have not yet tried Maida Heatter's Chocolate Mint Brownies. While they are delicious at any time, their layer of mint cream makes them especially appropriate for the St.Patrick's Day holiday. This is a layered treat. It begins with a dense fudgy brownie that is covered with peppermint cream and then coated with a gleaming, dark chocolate glaze. The peppermint cream can, of course, be tinted for those who wear the green and love overt symbols of the holiday. Brownies are one of the easiest dessert that can be made in our kitchens. They rarely require special equipment and this recipe can be made with a couple of bowls and a wooden spoon. Despite the ease with which these can be made, I promise you they are delicious. Just don't overbake them. While these can be made several days ahead of serving, they lose their sheen when refrigerated. I love the chocolate-mint combination and use it often. It works especially well here. If you need a dessert for St. Patrick's Day, I think you'll love this one. Here's the recipe. Double Chocolate Mint Brownies ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Maida Heatter Ingredients: Brownie Layer 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cut into pieces 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, coarsely chopped 1-1/4 cups granulated white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt Mint Layer 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup confectioners' sugar, sifted 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon pure peppermint extract or 1 to 2 tablespoons creme de menthe Green food coloring (optional) Chocolate Glaze 3 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F and place the rack in the center of the oven. 2) Line a 9 x 9-inch pan with aluminum foil, covering bottom and two opposite sides of pan. Foil is used to lift brownies from pan. Set aside. 3) In a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water, melt butter and chocolate. Remove from heat and stir in sugar and vanilla extract. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well with a wooden spoon after each addition. Stir in flour and salt and beat, with a wooden spoon, until batter is smooth and glossy and comes away from sides of pan (about one minute). Pour batter evenly into prepared pan. Bake in preheated oven for about 25 minutes or until brownies start to pull away from the sides of pan and the edges of brownies are just beginning to brown. A toothpick inserted in center of brownies will come out almost clean. Remove from oven and place on a rack to completely cool. 4) To make mint layer, combine butter, confectioners' sugar, heavy cream, peppermint extract in a small bowl and beat until smooth. Add a few drops of green food coloring if you wish. If frosting is too thick, add a little extra cream. (Frosting should be just thin enough to spread.) Spread frosting evenly over cooled brownie layer. Place in refrigerator for about 5-10 minutes, or until firm. 5) To make chocolate glaze, melt chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Spread over mint filling and refrigerate for about 30 minutes or until chocolate glaze starts to dull. 6) To serve, remove brownies from pan by lifting with ends of foil and transfer to a cutting board. With a sharp knife, cut into 30 squares. These brownies can be refrigerated for several days or else frozen. Yield: 30 squares. You might also enjoy these recipes: Chocolate Mint Brownies - David Lebovitz Salted Fudge Brownies - Verses from My Kitchen Peanut Butter Brownies - Being Suzy Homemaker Cakey Chocolate Brownies - Cookerati Chocolate Brownie - The Purple Foodie Quick and Easy Mocha Fudge Brownies - The Perfect Pantry Oreo Brownies with Buttercream Frosting - Love from the Oven Pecan Caramel Fudge Brownies - The Art of Baking Hot Chocolate Brownies - Sugar Plum Chocolate Cheesecake Brownie - Almost Bourdain Kahlua Brownies - Simply Recipes Iced Butterscotch Brownies - Culinary in the Dessert Mexican Chocolate Brownies - One Perfect Bite Bittersweets:The Ultimate Brownie - One Perfect Bite Red Velvet Cheesecake Brownies - Baking Bites

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

What Les Halles is the Recipes to Rival challenge of the month? It's Anthony Bourdain's version of coq au vin. He describes this dish as "an old, tough bird that you have to drown in wine to get to taste good." Unfortunately, there's more to it than that. There are several disparate steps to this recipe. There is, of course, the braising of the chicken, but the completed dish is enhanced by separate preparations of onions and mushrooms that require special care. The end product can be quite lovely. My problem? My culinary skills, whatever they are, were honed in the 70's and early 80's of the last century. That means I've made a lot of coq au vin and have some very firm opinions as to how it should be prepared. The hard part was keeping my changes to a minimum and preparing the recipe as it was written. I think I did fairly well. Change number one; the recipe called for a stewing hen. Local butchers laughed at me, so I used a 3-1/2 pound free range chicken. Change number two; I substituted a good shiraz for the burgundy wine that's normally used because I prefer to drink shiraz. Change number three; I added a quantity of thick (almost jelly-like) chicken stock to cover the chicken as it braised. Change number four; I increased the amount of bacon used in the recipe to 6-ounces, but blanched the lardons before adding them to the pot. Change number five; I used thawed, frozen pearl onions instead of fresh. My family can deftly move onions from one side of the plate to another before burying them under chicken bones, so the onions are just for show and I refuse to kill myself preparing them. Change number six; I added 1 tablespoon of tomato paste to kill the purple color of the wine that caused the chicken to look black and blue. I also reduce the sauce by half before napping the chicken and vegetables. Technically, when a young chicken is used to replace the stewing hen the dish should be called braised chicken, not coq au vin. I'll never forget how the use of a young bird offended Andre Soltner when he judged a Top Chef episode. If you have time and would like to prepare coq au vin in the classical manner, you'll love this recipe. It is delicious, but it does take time that includes a 24 hour marination. My changes can be identified by red print. The original recipe can be found at Recipes to Rival . This months challenge is being hosted by founders Temperance of High on the Hog and Lori of Lipsmacking Goodness . Coq au Vin from the Les Halles Cookbook, by Anthony Bourdain Ingredients: 1 bottle/1 liter plus 1 cup/225 ml of red wine - I used Rosemont shiraz 1 onion, cut into a 1-inch/2.5 cm dice 1 carrot, cut into ¼-inch/6-mm slices 1 celery rib, cut into ½ inch/1-cm slices 4 whole cloves 1 tbs/14 g whole black peppercorns 1 bouquet garni - a bay leaf, 3 sprigs of thyme and 4 sprigs parsley tied in a large coffee filter 1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 to 3 cups reduced chicken stock 1 whole chicken, about 3.5 lb/1.35 kg, “trimmed” – meaning guts, wing tips and neckbone removed salt and freshly ground pepper 1 tbs/28 ml olive oil 6 tbs/75 g butter, softened 1 tbs/14 g flour ¼ lb/112 g lardons - I used 6-oz. blanched lardons ½ lb/ 225 g small, white button mushrooms, stems removed 12 pearl onions, peeled - I used 1 cup thawed, frozen pearl onions pinch of sugar Directions: 1) The day before beginning to cook, combine the bottle of red wine, the diced onion, sliced carrots, celery, cloves, peppercorns, and bouquet garni in a large deep bowl. Add the chicken and submerge it in the liquid so that all of it is covered. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. 2) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat it dry. Put it aside. Strain the marinade through the fine strainer, reserving the liquids and solids separately. Season the chicken with salt and pepper inside and out. In the large Dutch oven, heat the oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter until almost smoking, and then sear the chicken, turning it with the tongs to evenly brown it. Once browned, it should be removed from the pot and set it aside again. Add the reserved onions, celery, and carrot to the pot and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and mix well with the wooden spoon so that the vegetables are coated. Now stir in the reserved strained marinade. Stir in tomato paste. Put the chicken back in the pot, along with the bouquet garni. Add thick chicken broth to cover chicken. Bring to a simmer; cover pot and bake for 1 hour and ten minutes. 3) While chicken braises in oven, cook the bacon lardons in the small sauté pan over medium heat until golden brown. Remove the bacon from the pan and drain it on paper towels, making sure to keep about 1 tablespoon/14 g of fat in the pan. Saute the mushroom tops in the bacon fat until golden brown. Set them aside. Now, in the small saucepan, combine the pearl onions, the pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and 2tablespoons/28 g of butter. Add just enough water to just cover the onions; then cover the pan with the parchment paper trimmed to the same size of the pan. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until the water has evaporated. Keep a close eye on it. Remove the paper cover and continue to cook until the onions are golden brown. Set the onions aside and add the remaining cup/225 ml of red wine along with salt and pepper and reduce over medium-high heat until thick enough to coat the back of the spoon. 4) When the chicken is cooked through – meaning tender, the juice from the thigh running clear when pricked – carefully remove from the liquid, cut into quarters, and arrange on the deep serving platter. Strain the cooking liquid (again). Return to a pan and cook until sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon. Add reduced red wine. Add the bacon, mushrooms, and pearl onions, adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons/28 g of butter. Pour sauce over the chicken. Yield: 4 servings.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

2 lbs pork belly, cut into 2 in cubes (5 cm) 1 lb pork shoulder, cut into 2 in cubes (5cm) 4 cups water 1 bouquet garni (1 sprig flat parsley, 2 sprigs of fresh thyme, 1 bay leaf -all tied with a string so its easy to ret) 1 teaspoon salt 1 pinch black pepper 1 lb pork fat, cut into thin slices 1 Place the pork belly and shoulder in a heavy bottomed pot. Add water and the bouquet garni and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally. 2 After 6 hours, stir in the salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Discard the bouquet garni. 3 Once the meat is cooled enough to handle, transfer it to a mixing bowl, using forks, shred the meat (not mush, SHREDS is the key) 4 Shovel some still warm pork into your mouth -- you know you want to. 5 Divide the mixture among several small containers. Top each portion with a slice or two of pork fat to completely cover it, fold the mixture together a bit then wrap each container in plastic wrap. 6 Place in the refrigerator and let them sit for 3 days before serving. Don't cheat on the 3 days because it just gets better as the flavors marry up!

Source: food.com

2 lbs pork belly, cut into 2 in cubes (5 cm) 1 lb pork shoulder, cut into 2 in cubes (5cm) 4 cups water 1 bouquet garni (1 sprig flat parsley, 2 sprigs of fresh thyme, 1 bay leaf -all tied with a string so its easy to ret) 1 teaspoon salt 1 pinch black pepper 1 lb pork fat, cut into thin slices 1 Place the pork belly and shoulder in a heavy bottomed pot. Add water and the bouquet garni and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally. 2 After 6 hours, stir in the salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Discard the bouquet garni. 3 Once the meat is cooled enough to handle, transfer it to a mixing bowl, using forks, shred the meat (not mush, SHREDS is the key) 4 Shovel some still warm pork into your mouth -- you know you want to. 5 Divide the mixture among several small containers. Top each portion with a slice or two of pork fat to completely cover it, fold the mixture together a bit then wrap each container in plastic wrap. 6 Place in the refrigerator and let them sit for 3 days before serving. Don't cheat on the 3 days because it just gets better as the flavors marry up!

Source: food.com

6 tablespoons butter 1 onion , thinly sliced 12 ounces button mushrooms , halved 4 cups chicken stock 1 sprig parsley 2 ounces sherry wine salt and pepper 1 Over medium heat, melt two tablespoons of the butter in a saucepan. Toss in the onion and cook until soft but not browned. 2 Toss in the remaining butter and then add the mushrooms. Cook for 8 minutes. 3 Pour in the chicken stock, add the parsley, and bring to a boil. When bubbling, reduce to a simmer and cook for an hour. 4 Pour soup into a blender (you might need to do this in stages), and process until smooth. Return to the saucepan and bring to a simmer. Pour in the sherry, and season with salt and pepper.

Source: food.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... What do these pictures have in common? They capture a moment in time that I want to share with you. On the way to meet a cook who had graciously agreed to walk us through the basics of Spanish home cooking, the Silver Fox and I came across a band of gypsy troubadours performing the flamenco for onlookers in the town square. These squares are usually ringed with tapas bars and today's recipe is for a tapa that was being served at the time we stopped to watch and listen to the flamenco performance. The recipe and a recommendation for the books came later that day. I ordered the books you see as soon a we got home, and following their delivery this morning, I spent the better part of the day paging through them. Wow! Jose Pizarro is a chef and a restaurateur, and if you are at all interested in Spanish cooking, do try to get these books. I was able to purchase mine on Amazon at bargain basement prices, and I've already put together a list of recipes that I want to try. They are easy to follow, made with readily available ingredients and the photography perfectly captures the vibrancy of Spanish cooking. You can almost taste these dishes as you turn the pages. It is hard to duplicate Anthony Bourdain's Spanish experience in tourist hotels and restaurants, but books like these make it possible to create that experience in your own kitchen should you want to try. I hope you'll stay tuned. Tonight's recipes, which come from a home cook, are for two frequently served tapas. Either of them makes a delightful mouthful, if, and it is a big if, you assemble them just before serving. They get soggy quickly, so do be forewarned. I personally love the pepper and anchovy combination, while the Silver Fox, who loves Manchego cheese, prefers the tomato version. I do hope you'll give them a try. If you enjoy bruschetta, I know you'll like these Spanish tostadas. Here is how they are made. Tostadas - Tomato and Pepper Toasts ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite Ingredients: 1 large loaf Italian bread 1/2 cup shaved manchego cheese 2 (2-oz.) tins anchovy fillets, drained 1/3 cup olive oil Tomato Topping 5 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded, chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon garlic, finely chopped 2 tablespoons chopped parsley Pepper Topping 2 large roasted red peppers, skinned, stemmed, seeded, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar Directions: 1) Cut bread into 1/2-inch slices. Toast half of slices on both sides. 2) For tomato topping: Combine tomato, olive oil, garlic and parsley in a small bowl. Spread toasted bread slices with tomato mixture, then top with cheese. 3) For pepper topping: Combine peppers, oil and vinegar in a bowl. Cover un-toasted bread slices with pepper mixture, then top with an anchovy fillet. 4) Serve immediately. Yield: 40 tostadas Older Posts One Year Ago Today: Two Years Ago Today: Turkey and Corn Quesidillas Peruvian Chancay Bread Three Years Ago Today: Four Years Ago Today: Carrot and Fennel Soup Masala Chai

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

How do you cook quinoa? I was recently asked. The answer is simple. Easy. Fast. Rockin'. I cook it in a rice cooker. In fact, quinoa is the easiest no-fuss "grain" you'll ever cook. It's healthy fast food. Cook up a batch ahead of time and you can stir up a fabulous light lunch (like the Lime Quinoa Salad with Mint ) in a New York minute. Well, maybe a Los Angeles minute. No wait. A Venice Beach minute. How to cook quinoa in a rice cooker: 1. Using a fine mesh sieve rinse 1 cup of organic quinoa in cold water. Drain. 2. Dump rinsed quinoa into your rice cooker. 3. Add 2 cups fresh water* see notes. 4. Turn on your rice cooker. That's it. In about fifteen minutes* you'll have hot fluffy quinoa to play with. Quinoa is rather bland on its own and loves flavor spikes. So add herbs etc. My favorite thing to do is stir-fry cooked quinoa with various seasonings- herbs, garlic, spices, onion, etc. I add in fresh veggies and whatever else I might have on hand. Quinoa makes delicious and hearty pilaf, sprightly salads, or a warm and grainy side dish in place of rice. I've even used it to stuff cabbage, acorn squash, peppers and portobello mushroom caps. For those of you without a rice cooker: Add the cup of rinsed organic quinoa to a saucepan add 2 cups fresh water; bring to a boil, lower the heat to low; cover and simmer until cooked. Fluff with a fork. Season while warm and use in salads or stuffing recipes, Store covered, in the fridge, for almost instant meals. Use within three days for best taste. Notes* Start with 2 cups water in a rice cooker. At higher altitudes , use more water-- 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 cups water. High altitude also requires a longer cooking time, generally. If the quinoa turns out too crunchy or nubby you need to up the ratio of water to grain; start by adding another 1/4 cup liquid. I prefer my quinoa soft and tender, fluffed with a fork. Note- r ed and black quinoa may require extra water- especially if it turns out more crunchy than fluffy. Sometimes I add broth to the liquid to boost the flavor of the quinoa- this works especially well when making a savory pilaf or winter quinoa with hearty flavors- onion, mushrooms, eggplant, etc. I don't use broth in my lighter salad style quinoa dishes- but that's my personal taste. Why you might want to try quinoa... Quinoa is very laid back and not full of itself at all. It's not upper crust or snobby, or ultra-cool and exclusive. I imagine Tony Bourdain hates it (he likes to mock vegetarians, you know, which spurs him to demonstrate just how much by eating blow fish, animal tongues and roasted insects on camera fresh from the writhing snake blood tonic and chewing on various goat parts buried in a pit for two days). If it were a movie, quinoa would star a flip-flop wearing Jeff Bridges and insist you call it Dude. Or Duderino if you're not into the whole brevity thing. Besides its worth-its-weight-in-gold gluten-free status, quinoa (sounds like: keen-wa) is a superb source of balanced vegetable protein (so important for vegans) that packs a nutty nutritional punch. It contains nine amino acids- making it a complete vegetable protein. Some call it a super grain (I always envision a blazing red Q and a windswept cape when the word super is touted- a testimony to my visual thinking process) but quinoa, I have to tell you is not a cereal grain, Bubela. It's actually a seed from a plant family that includes beets and spinach. That might- technically- make it a Super Faux Grain. Or Faux Super Grain. I know. It doesn't have the same ring. Do we care? Here are some of my favorite quinoa recipes: Kale Salad with Quinoa, Tangerines and Roasted Almonds Lime Quinoa Salad with Mint Quinoa with Fresh Summer Vegetables Quinoa with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Leeks, and Slivered Almonds Quinoa Salad with Blueberries, Strawberries, and Watermelon Quinoa Salad with Pears, Baby Spinach, Chick Peas in Maple Vinaigrette Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets, Chick Peas + Orange Quinoa Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms Quinoa Mushroom Pilaf Quinoa Taco Salad Red Quinoa with Roasted Butternut Squash + Pecans Stuffed Cabbage with Roasted Sweet Potato and Quinoa Summer Quinoa Salad with Kalamatas and Mint Warm Spinach and Quinoa Salad with Grape Tomatoes Quinoa In Baking: Peanut Butter Quinoa Cookies Quinoa Pumpkin Cookies Quinoa Breakfast Bars with Blueberries Quinoa Breakfast Brownies Quinoa Breakfast Cake Quinoa Chocolate Brownies Quinoa Muffins with Pecans + Dark Chocolate More quinoa recipes from food blogs: At Lydia's Perfect Pantry Quinoa Salad with Tomatoes, Feta and Parsley Susan's Quinoa Vegetable Paella at FatFree Vegan Kitchen Ilva's Quinoa Apple Cake with Cinnamon and Coconut at Lucullian Delights All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you.

Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com



To better explain the experience, I must first introduce you to Elyse. I know her by way of mutual friends; our paths have crossed a handful of times, but ever since I started listening to her new podcast project, I knew she would be someone I would really enjoy. She has the kind of personality that draws people in - warm, confident, intentional, wise, assertive. She has a crazy story herself, one that could lead you towards darkness, but she exudes light. And consequently has the easiest and best laugh I've ever heard. She's a trained therapist, so you expect some of that, but to experience her is different. An extensive education doesn't compare to someones natural strengths. Like I said, I knew I liked her before I attended her retreat last weekend, but what she is building - creating a space for people to feel vulnerable and seen and to be moved out of their own way - is remarkable.

It was essentially two days, with a group of five other women, while Elyse led us through her curriculum of, as she puts it, "looking at a practical evaluation of your history, and the current repercussions of your experiences and core beliefs." We wrote a letter to our younger selves, broke down a timeline of our own lives, shared stories with each other that near broke us - stories of loss and abuse and silence and shame - each woman had something to share from such different perspectives and circumstance. I left feeling like I had untangled a few things that were leaving callouses on my heart. I left feeling motivated about how to practically move towards what I need - both professionally and personally. One of the exercises had a line that stuck with me: "you are already the woman you want to be." I needed a push out of my head, out of some old stories and self doubt to believe that. Go for it! Do it! Have the conversation. Engage in the conflict instead of always keeping peace. Start the business.

On the heels of the terrible loss of Anthony Bourdain, I feel responsible to point you towards soul food just as much as I do literal food. This past weekend was that for me. In my experience, pulling things out of your head, into the light and looking at them with another perspective, goes a long way towards putting them back under your control rather than the other way around. The internet sells us things all day long; promising things to fix our insecurities. There is quieter messaging about seeking connection, so I'll say this for whomever may need to hear it - invest in the friendships, invite people over, say what you need, spend the money on a therapist, ditch the life sucking boyfriend, take the risk, get down and play.

It's actually pretty difficult to put it all to words honestly, but I'm still riding my high of bringing some power back to me, and I want to give some of that to you. You are enough. You are capable. You are smart and beautiful and worthy.“Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart. Try to love the questions themselves, like locked rooms and like books written in a foreign language. Do not now look for the answers. They cannot now be given to you because you could not live them. It is a question of experiencing everything. At present you need to live the question. Perhaps you will gradually, without even noticing it, find yourself experiencing the answer, some distant day.”

― Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet BABY KALE SALAD WITH CHERRIES, MARINATED LENTILS + GOAT CHEESE

Serves 2-4

I'm into having a salad special and eating a few days in a row. I prep the components, then it is just ready to throw together with little fuss. In this case, I double up the dressing, cherries pitted and halved, lentils marinated, clean lettuce stocked. Then when it comes to making a salad, it takes 2 minutes instead of starting from scratch.

Swap in peaches for cherries as needed, their seasonal window is short. Grilled salmon or chicken works on here too, otherwise it's great and easy as is.

 INGREDIENTSmaple mustard vinaigrette1 Tbsp. dijon mustard1 Tbsp. maple syrup1 small shallot, minced1/4 cup apple cider vinegar1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil1/2 tsp. sea salt and peppertip of dried herbs - basil, oregano, Italian blend, whatever 1 cup cooked lentils1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar1/3 cup chopped parsley1 garlic clove, mincedsalt and pepper 4 cups/5 oz. baby kale1 cup pitted and halved cherries4 ounces soft goats cheese1/2 cup toasted almonds INSTRUCTIONS

Put all the dressing ingredients in a jar with a lid and shake it all together (I clean out old nut butter and jam jars to store condiments). Set aside.

Mix the lentils, oil, vinegar, parsley, garlic and a generous pinch of salt and pepper together and stir to mix. This can be done a day or two in advance and kept covered in the fridge.

Toss the greens and cherries in desired amount of dressing. Top with a scoop of the lentils, goat cheese and almonds.

Source: sproutedkitchen.com

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