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Return to Kalyn's Kitchen home For the benefit of those following The South Beach diet, notations after each recipe listing indicate Kalyn's opinion as to which phase of the diet that recipe can be used for. Click for Latest Info About Printing Recipes on Kalyn's Kitchen Soup Recipe Collections Ten Favorite Phase One Soups to Help You Get Through December 2011 Five Favorite Phase One Soups Five Favorite Bean Soups or Stew for Autumn Chili (Dried beans and lentils are approved for all phases of the South Beach Diet, but I eat them sparingly for phase one.) Slow Cooker Recipe for Beef and Refried Bean Chili with Salsa and Lime (all phases, but a small serving for phase one) Vegan Lentil Chili with Roasted Red Peppers, Olives, and Green Onion (all phases, but a small serving for Phase One) Crockpot Pumpkin Chili with Ground Beef, Black Beans, and Kidney Beans (phase 2 or 3 due to the pumpkin in the chili) Amy's Amazing White Chicken Chili (all phases) Leftover Turkey (or ground turkey) and Pinto Bean White Chili with Lime and Cilantro (all phases) Not Just For the Superbowl Chili (all phases) Turkey and White Bean Chili with Chocolate ( all phases ) Black Bean and Beef Chili with Cilantro, Lime, and Avocado Salsa (all phases) Crockpot Black Bean Chili with Lime and Cilantro (all phases ) Soup or Stew with Barley, Wheatberries, or Farro Ground Turkey and Barley Soup with Mushrooms and Spinach (phase 2 or 3) Chicken Soup with Farro, Kale, and Turmeric (phase 2 or 3) Comforting Ground Beef and Barley Soup (phase 2 or 3) Barley Minestrone with Canadian Bacon, Savoy Cabbage, and Rosemary (phase 2 or 3) Mushroom Barley Soup with Ham and Leeks (phase 2 or 3) Turkey Barley Soup (phase 2 or 3) Chicken Barley Soup (phase 2 or 3) Autumn Harvest Soup with Butternut Squash, Kale, and Farro (phase 2 or 3) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Mushrooms, Carrots, and Wheatberries (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Dried Beans (Dried beans and lentils are approved for all phases of the South Beach Diet, but I eat them sparingly for phase one.) Spicy Vegan Black Bean Soup with Cilantro and Green Tobasco (all phases) Lucky Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Chicken Garlic Sausage and Bell Peppers (all phases) Spicy Vegetarian Butternut Squash Soup with Black Beans, Red Bell Peppers, and Cilantro (phase 2 or 3) Spicy Slow Cooker Soup with Ground Turkey, Pinto Beans, Red Bell Pepper, and Green Chiles (all phases) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Shaved Parmesan (all phases) Slow Cooker Cannellini Bean Stew with Tomatoes, Italian Sausage, and Kale (all phases) Slow Cooker Kielbasa and White Bean Stew with Tomatoes and Spinach (all phases) Slow Cooker Recipe for Spicy Ground Beef and Bean Soup with Cabbage and Spinach (all phases) Mushroom, White Bean, and Tomato Stew with Parmesan (all phases if served plain in a bowl; phase 2 or 3 if served over rice) Barley Minestrone with Canadian Bacon, Savoy Cabbage, and Rosemary (phase 2 or 3) Crockpot Recipe for Red Lentil, Chickpea, and Tomato Soup with Smoked Paprika (all phases but limited serving for phase one) Vegetarian Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup with Lime (phase 2 or 3) Twice-Cooked Gigantes Beans with Garlic and Feta (phase 2 or 3, or if you omit the carrots you could have a small serving of this for phase one) Chard and Chickpea Soup with Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Ground Chicken (or Turkey ) and Chickpea Curry Stew with Yogurt and Cilantro (all phases) Navy Bean and Refried Bean Stew with Ham, Leeks, and Tomatoes (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Sausage, Peppers, and Cannellini Bean Stew with Parmesan (all phases) Ground Turkey and Bean Stew with Cumin, Green Chiles, and Cilantro (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Ham and Sherry Vinegar (all phases) Spicy Red Lentil and Chickpea Stew / Paula's Moroccan Lentil Stew (phase one without rice, phase 2 or 3 over brown rice) Garbanzo Bean (Chickpea) Soup with Garlic, Sumac, Olive Oil, and Lemon (all phases) White Bean Soup with Ham and Rosemary (all phases but leave out carrots for phase one) Chicken, Black Bean and Cilantro Soup (all phases) Hopping John Soup (Black-eyed Peas, Ham, and Collard Greens) ( all phases ) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Anasazi Bean and Cabbage Soup (all phases if you leave out carrots, phase 2 or 3 with carrots) Italian Sausage and Bean Soup with Chard (all phases) Chicken Soup with Garbanzos and Oregano (all phases) Black Bean and Rice Soup with Cilantro and Lime (phase 2 or 3) White Bean and Ham Soup with Chard ( all phases ) Chicken and Pinto Bean Soup with Lime and Cilantro ( all phases ) White Bean Soup with Roasted Turkey Italian Sausage, Zucchini, and Basil ( all phases ) Roasted Tomato Soup with Ground Beef, Sausage, Garbanzos, Macaroni, and Basil (phase 2 or 3 with Dreamfields or whole-grain macaroni) Leftover Turkey and Sweet Potato Soup with Black Beans and Lime (phase 2 or 3) Butter Bean (or Lima Bean) Soup with Ham and Cabbage (all phases) Garbanzo and White Bean Soup with Lamb and Rosemary (all phases without carrots, phase 2 or 3 with carrots) Cannelini Bean Soup with Roasted Italian Sausage and Escarole (all phases) Chickpea (garbanzo bean) Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Basil (all phases) Chipotle and Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Double Cilantro (all phases) Roasted Italian Sausage Soup with Garbanzos, Lentils, and Roasted Tomatoes (all phases) Vegetarian Black Bean and Tomatillo Soup with Lime and Cilantro (all phases) Sausage and Red Russian Kale Soup with Tomatoes, Chickpeas, and Herbs (all phases) Pressure Cooker Vegetable Soup with Giant White Beans, Ham, and Bay leaves (all phases) Turkey and Cannellini Bean Soup with Rosemary and Sweet Potatoes (phase 2 or 3) Revithia - Greek Chickpea Soup with Lemon and Olive Oil (all phases) Spicy Pinto Bean Soup with Ham, Tomatoes, and Cilantro (pressure cooker or soup pot instructions) (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Sausage Stew with Tomatoes and Basil (all phases) Pinto Bean and Ground Beef Stew with Cumin and Cilantro (pressure cooker or soup pot instructions) (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Black Bean Stew with Roasted Red Pepper, Chicken, and Cilantro (stovetop instructions included - all phases) Cannellini Bean and Lentil Stew with Ham (all phases) Soup or Stew with Beef Slow Cooker Recipe for Spicy Ground Beef and Bean Soup with Cabbage and Spinach (all phases) Comforting Ground Beef and Barley Soup (phase 2 or 3) Leftover Corned Beef Soup with Sauerkraut and Tomatoes (all phases, but corned beef is an occasional treat due to fat content) Leftover Roast Beef Italian Stew (all phases) Goulash Soup with Red Pepper and Cabbage (all phases) Taco Soup Recipe (all phases, can add corn chips for non-South Beach Dieters) Ground Beef and Sauerkraut Soup (all phases) Beef Stew with Dried Mushrooms (all phases) Slow Cooker Mediterranean Beef Stew with Rosemary and Balsamic Vinegar (all phases) Roasted Tomato Soup with Ground Beef, Sausage, Garbanzos, Macaroni, and Basil (phase 2 or 3 with Dreamfields or whole-grain macaroni) Lentil Soup with Ground Beef and Brown Rice (phase 2 or 3) Crockpot Beef Stew with Olives, Garlic, Capers, and tomatoes (all phases) Pinto Bean and Ground Beef Stew with Cumin and Cilantro (pressure cooker or soup pot instructions) (all phases) Soup or Stew with Bell Peppers Slow Cooker Thai-Inspired Butternut Squash Soup with Red Bell Pepper, Lime, and Cilantro (phase 2 or 3) Lucky Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Chicken Garlic Sausage and Bell Peppers (all phases) Spicy Slow Cooker Soup with Ground Turkey, Pinto Beans, Red Bell Pepper, and Green Chiles (all phases) Vegetarian Mushroom Stew with Red Bell Pepper, Onion, and Paprika (all phases) Green Zebra Gazpacho with Cucumber and Avocado (all phases) Spicy Yellow Split Pea Soup with Italian Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Chard and Chickpea Soup with Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Crockpot Recipe for Sausage, Peppers, and Cannellini Bean Stew with Parmesan (all phases) Italian Sausage and Zucchini Soup (phase 2 or 3 or all phases if you leave out the macaroni) Confetti Gazpacho (cold tomato soup) with Yellow Tomatoes, Red Peppers, and Basil (all phases) Gazpacho (cold tomato soup) (all phases) Gazpacho for Garden Tomato Week, lots of links to other Gazpacho recipes (all phases) Lentil Soup with Italian Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers (all phases) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Ham and Cabbage Soup with Red Bell Peppers (Phase 2 or 3, or leave out the carrots to make this phase one) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Bay Leaves, Epazote, and Red Bell Pepper or Carrots (all phases, but use red bell pepper for phase one) Soup or Stew with Broccoli Curried Chicken Soup with Broccoli (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Cabbage Slow Cooker Cabbage Soup with Tomatoes, Chicken-Garlic Sausage, and Parmesan (all phases) Slow Cooker Recipe for Spicy Ground Beef and Bean Soup with Cabbage and Spinach (all phases) Barley Minestrone with Canadian Bacon, Savoy Cabbage, and Rosemary (phase 2 or 3) Leftover Corned Beef Soup with Sauerkraut and Tomatoes (all phases, but corned beef is an occasional treat due to fat content) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Ham and Cabbage Soup with Red Bell Peppers (Phase 2 or 3, or leave out the carrots to make this phase one) Goulash Soup with Red Pepper and Cabbage (all phases) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Anasazi Bean and Cabbage Soup (all phases if you leave out carrots, phase 2 or 3 with carrots) Ground Beef and Sauerkraut Soup (all phases) Lentil and Sausage Soup with Cabbage ( all phases ) Butter Bean (or Lima Bean) Soup with Ham and Cabbage (all phases) Turkey and Wild Rice Soup with Cabbage, Parsley, and Sage (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Chicken Chicken Soup with Farro, Kale, and Turmeric (phase 2 or 3) Coconut-Lime Turkey (or Chicken) and Rice Soup (phase 2 or 3) Ground Chicken (or Turkey ) and Chickpea Curry Stew with Yogurt and Cilantro (all phases) West African Chicken and Peanut Stew with Chiles, Ginger, and Green Onions (all phases) Making Homemade Chicken Stock (all phases) Curried Chicken Soup with Broccoli (phase 2 or 3) Chicken, Black Bean and Cilantro Soup (all phases) Greek Egg-Lemon-Rice Soup with Thyme / Avgolemono Soup (phase 2 or 3) Thai Chicken Soup (all phases) Chicken Barley Soup (phase 2 or 3) Chicken Soup with Garbanzos and Oregano (all phases) Chicken and Tomatillo Soup (all phases) Chicken Soup with Collard Greens, Carrots, and Brown Rice (phase 2 or 3) Chicken and Pinto Bean Soup with Lime and Cilantro (all phases) South Beach Diet Friendly Chicken Noodle Soup with Thyme (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Fish Spicy Red Fish Stew (all phases) Soup or Stew with Greens Ground Turkey and Barley Soup with Mushrooms and Spinach (phase 2 or 3) Indian-Spiced Slow Cooker Red Lentil Soup with Spinach and Coconut Milk (all phases, limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Greek Lentil Soup with Tomatoes, Spinach, and Feta (all phases; limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Shaved Parmesan (all phases) Chicken Soup with Farro, Kale, and Turmeric (phase 2 or 3) Slow Cooker Cannellini Bean Stew with Tomatoes, Italian Sausage, and Kale (all phases) Slow Cooker Recipe for Spicy Ground Beef and Bean Soup with Cabbage and Spinach (all phases) Crockpot (or Stovetop) Double Lentil, Sausage, Brown Rice, and Spinach Soup (phase 2 or 3) Chard and Chickpea Soup with Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Italian Sausage and Kale Soup with Whole Wheat Spaghetti Pieces (phase 2 or 3) Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Ham and Sherry Vinegar (all phases) Hopping John Soup (Black-eyed Peas, Ham, and Collard Greens) ( all phases ) Italian Sausage and Bean Soup with Chard (all phases) Chicken Soup with Collard Greens, Carrots, and Brown Rice (phase 2 or 3) White Bean and Ham Soup with Chard (phase 2 or 3) Cannelini Bean Soup with Roasted Italian Sausage and Escarole (all phases) Vegetarian Lentil Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Cumin (all phases) Chickpea (garbanzo bean) Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Basil (all phases) Autumn Harvest Soup with Butternut Squash, Kale, and Farro (phase 2 or 3) Sausage and Red Russian Kale Soup with Tomatoes, Chickpeas, and Herbs (all phases) Healing Asian Soup with Ginger, Spinach, and Mushrooms (all phases) Soup or Stew with Ham Navy Bean and Refried Bean Stew with Ham, Leeks, and Tomatoes (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Ham and Sherry Vinegar (all phases) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Ham and Cabbage Soup with Red Bell Peppers (Phase 2 or 3, or leave out the carrots to make this phase one) White Bean Soup with Ham and Rosemary ( all phases but leave out carrots for phase one) Mushroom Barley Soup with Ham and Leeks (phase 2 or 3) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Bay Leaves, Epazote, and Red Bell Pepper or Carrots (all phases, but use red bell pepper for phase one) Hopping John Soup (Black-eyed Peas, Ham, and Collard Greens) ( all phases ) Crockpot or Stovetop Recipe for Anasazi Bean and Cabbage Soup (all phases if you leave out carrots, phase 2 or 3 with carrots) White Bean and Ham Soup with Chard ( all phases ) Butter Bean (or Lima Bean) Soup with Ham and Cabbage (all phases) Pressure Cooker Vegetable Soup with Giant White Beans, Ham, and Bay leaves (all phases) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Mushrooms, Carrots, and Wheatberries (phase 2 or 3) Cannellini Bean and Lentil Stew with Ham (all phases) Soup or Stew with Lamb Garbanzo and White Bean Soup with Lamb and Rosemary (all phases without carrots, phase 2 or 3 with carrots) Soup or Stew with Lentils or Split Peas (also called pulses) (Dried beans and lentils are approved for all phases of the South Beach Diet, but I eat them sparingly for phase one.) Indian-Spiced Slow Cooker Red Lentil Soup with Spinach and Coconut Milk (all phases, limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Greek Lentil Soup with Tomatoes, Spinach, and Feta (all phases; limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Lentil Soup with Turkey Bratwurst, Leeks, and Sherry Vinegar (phase 2 or 3 due to the carrots, or leave out carrots for a phase 1 version) Spicy Sausage, Lentil, and Tomato Soup (all phases) Spicy Yellow Split Pea Soup with Italian Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Crockpot (or Stovetop) Red Lentil and Sweet Potato Soup with Curry and Coconut Milk (phase 2 or 3) Crockpot (or Stovetop) Double Lentil, Sausage, Brown Rice, and Spinach Soup (phase 2 or 3) Mexican Red Lentil Stew with Lime and Cilantro (all phases. vegan) Spicy Red Lentil and Chickpea Stew / Paula's Moroccan Lentil Stew (phase one without rice, phase 2 or 3 over brown rice) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Bay Leaves, Epazote, and Red Bell Pepper or Carrots (all phases, but use red bell pepper for phase one) Steve's Lentil Soup (Inspired by Farmgirl) ( all phases ) Lentil and Sausage Soup with Cabbage ( all phases ) Lentil and Sausage Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Herbs (phase 2 or 3) Lentil Soup with Ground Beef and Brown Rice (phase 2 or 3) Lentil Soup with Italian Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers (all phases) Vegetarian Lentil Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Cumin (all phases) Roasted Italian Sausage Soup with Garbanzos, Lentils, and Roasted Tomatoes (all phases) Split Pea Soup with Chicken Sausage and Carrots (phase 2 or 3) African-Inspired Vegetarian (or vegan) Crockpot Soup with Peanut Butter, Chiles, Brown Rice, and Lentils (phase 2 or 3) Curried Lentil Soup with Cilantro (all phases) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Mushrooms, Carrots, and Wheatberries (phase 2 or 3) Cannellini Bean and Lentil Stew with Ham (all phases) Soup or Stew with Mushrooms Ground Turkey and Barley Soup with Mushrooms and Spinach (phase 2 or 3) Vegetarian Mushroom Stew with Red Bell Pepper, Onion, and Paprika (all phases) Mushroom, White Bean, and Tomato Stew with Parmesan (all phases if served plain in a bowl; phase 2 or 3 if served over rice) Leftover Turkey, Mushroom, and Wild Rice Soup (phase 2 or 3) Mushroom Barley Soup with Ham and Leeks (phase 2 or 3) Leftover Turkey Soup with Double Mushrooms (leave out carrots for phase 1, can add barley or rice for phase 2 or 3) Beef Stew with Dried Mushrooms (all phases) Slow Cooker Mediterranean Beef Stew with Rosemary and Balsamic Vinegar (all phases) Healing Asian Soup with Ginger, Spinach, and Mushrooms (all phases) Double Mushroom Soup (inspired by Anthony Bourdain's Mushroom Soup Recipe) (all phases) Split Pea Soup with Ham, Mushrooms, Carrots, and Wheatberries (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Pasta or Noodles (Edit June 2011 - I have recently discovered that when Dreamfields pasta is cooked longer than the specified time it increases the glycemic index, so I am editing these recipes to reflect that information. Any recipe that uses Dreamfields is probably phase 3 if the pasta is cooked for a long time or reheated. You can of course use whole wheat pasta to make these for phase 2.) Easy Recipe for Italian Sausage, Tomato, and Macaroni Soup with Basil (phase 2 or 3 with whole wheat pasta, but probably phase 3 with Dreamfields pasta) Italian Sausage and Kale Soup with Whole Wheat Spaghetti Pieces (phase 2 or 3) Roasted Tomato Soup with Ground Beef, Sausage, Garbanzos, Macaroni, and Basil (phase 2 or 3 with whole wheat macaroni, but probably phase 3 with Dreamfields macaroni) Italian Sausage and Zucchini Soup (phase 2 or 3 with whole wheat macaroni but probably phase 3 with Dreamfields macaroni, or all phases if you leave out the macaroni) South Beach Diet Friendly Chicken Noodle Soup with Thyme (phase 2 or 3 with whole wheat noodles but probably phase 3 with Dreamfields noodles) Soup or Stew with Pork Crockpot Recipe for Pork and Green Chile Stew - Nefi's Green Chile Stew (all phases) Barley Minestrone with Canadian Bacon, Savoy Cabbage, and Rosemary (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Rice Crockpot (or Stovetop) Double Lentil, Sausage, Brown Rice, and Spinach Soup (phase 2 or 3) Coconut-Lime Turkey (or Chicken) and Rice Soup (phase 2 or 3) Curried Chicken Soup with Broccoli (phase 2 or 3) Leftover Turkey, Mushroom, and Wild Rice Soup (phase 2 or 3) Greek Egg-Lemon-Rice Soup with Thyme / Avgolemono Soup (phase 2 or 3) Black Bean and Rice Soup with Cilantro and Lime (phase 2 or 3) Chicken Soup with Collard Greens, Carrots, and Brown Rice (phase 2 or 3) Lentil Soup with Ground Beef and Brown Rice (phase 2 or 3) Turkey and Wild Rice Soup with Cabbage, Parsley, and Sage (phase 2 or 3) African-Inspired Vegetarian (or vegan) Crockpot Soup with Peanut Butter, Chiles, Brown Rice, and Lentils (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Sausage Slow Cooker Cabbage Soup with Tomatoes, Chicken-Garlic Sausage, and Parmesan (all phases) Lucky Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Chicken Garlic Sausage and Bell Peppers (all phases) Slow Cooker Lentil Soup with Turkey Bratwurst, Leeks, and Sherry Vinegar (phase 2 or 3 due to the carrots, or leave out carrots for a phase 1 version) Slow Cooker Cannellini Bean Stew with Tomatoes, Italian Sausage, and Kale (all phases) Slow Cooker Kielbasa and White Bean Stew with Tomatoes and Spinach (all phases) Spicy Sausage, Lentil, and Tomato Soup (all phases) Spicy Yellow Split Pea Soup with Italian Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Easy Recipe for Italian Sausage, Tomato, and Macaroni Soup with Basil (phase 2 or 3) Crockpot (or Stovetop) Double Lentil, Sausage, Brown Rice, and Spinach Soup (phase 2 or 3) Chard and Chickpea Soup with Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Italian Sausage and Kale Soup with Whole Wheat Spaghetti Pieces (phase 2 or 3) Crockpot Recipe for Sausage, Peppers, and Cannellini Bean Stew with Parmesan (all phases) Italian Sausage and Zucchini Soup (phase 2 or 3 or all phases if you leave out the macaroni) Steve's Lentil Soup (Inspired by Farmgirl) ( all phases ) Italian Sausage and Bean Soup with Chard (all phases) Lentil and Sausage Soup with Cabbage ( all phases ) White Bean Soup with Roasted Turkey Italian Sausage, Zucchini, and Basil ( all phases ) Lentil and Sausage Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Herbs (phase 2 or 3) Roasted Tomato Soup with Ground Beef, Sausage, Garbanzos, Macaroni, and Basil (phase 2 or 3 with Dreamfields or whole-grain macaroni) Lentil Soup with Italian Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers (all phases) Cannelini Bean Soup with Roasted Italian Sausage and Escarole (all phases) Roasted Italian Sausage Soup with Garbanzos, Lentils, and Roasted Tomatoes (all phases) Split Pea Soup with Chicken Sausage and Carrots (phase 2 or 3) Sausage and Red Russian Kale Soup with Tomatoes, Chickpeas, and Herbs (all phases) Soup or Stew with Sweet Potatoes Vegetarian Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup with Lime (phase 2 or 3) Crockpot (or Stovetop) Red Lentil and Sweet Potato Soup with Curry and Coconut Milk (phase 2 or 3) Lentil and Sausage Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Herbs (phase 2 or 3) Leftover Turkey and Sweet Potato Soup with Black Beans and Lime (all phases) Turkey and Cannellini Bean Soup with Rosemary and Sweet Potatoes (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Tomatoes and Tomatillos Slow Cooker Vegetarian Greek Lentil Soup with Tomatoes, Spinach, and Feta (all phases; limit serving size for Phase One) Slow Cooker Cabbage Soup with Tomatoes, Chicken-Garlic Sausage, and Parmesan (all phases) Slow Cooker Vegetarian Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup with Shaved Parmesan (all phases) Slow Cooker Cannellini Bean Stew with Tomatoes, Italian Sausage, and Kale (all phases) Slow Cooker Kielbasa and White Bean Stew with Tomatoes and Spinach (all phases) Green Zebra Gazpacho with Cucumber and Avocado (all phases) Mushroom, White Bean, and Tomato Stew with Parmesan (all phases if served plain in a bowl; phase 2 or 3 if served over rice) Leftover Corned Beef Soup with Sauerkraut and Tomatoes (all phases, but corned beef is an occasional treat due to fat content) Spicy Sausage, Lentil, and Tomato Soup (all phases) Easy Recipe for Italian Sausage, Tomato, and Macaroni Soup with Basil (phase 2 or 3) Chard and Chickpea Soup with Sausage and Green Pepper (all phases) Italian Sausage and Kale Soup with Whole Wheat Spaghetti Pieces (phase 2 or 3) Navy Bean and Refried Bean Stew with Ham, Leeks, and Tomatoes (all phases) Mexican Red Lentil Stew with Lime and Cilantro (all phases, vegan) Goulash Soup with Red Pepper and Cabbage (all phases) Italian Sausage and Zucchini Soup (phase 2 or 3 or all phases if you leave out the macaroni) Chicken, Black Bean and Cilantro Soup (all phases) Gazpacho (cold tomato soup) (all phases) Gazpacho for Garden Tomato Week, lots of links to other Gazpacho recipes (all phases) Tomato and Cilantro Soup (all phases) Taco Soup Recipe (all phases, can add corn chips for non-South Beach Dieters) Chicken and Tomatillo Soup (all phases) Confetti Gazpacho (cold tomato soup) with Yellow Tomatoes, Red Peppers, and Basil (all phases) Roasted Tomato Soup with Ground Beef, Sausage, Garbanzos, Macaroni, and Basil (phase 2 or 3 with Dreamfields or whole-grain macaroni) Chickpea (garbanzo bean) Soup with Spinach, Tomatoes, and Basil (all phases) Roasted Italian Sausage Soup with Garbanzos, Lentils, and Roasted Tomatoes (all phases) Vegetarian Black Bean and Tomatillo Soup with Lime and Cilantro (all phases) Sausage and Red Russian Kale Soup with Tomatoes, Chickpeas, and Herbs (all phases) Cannellini Bean and Sausage Stew with Tomatoes and Basil (all phases) Soup or Stew with Turkey Ground Turkey and Barley Soup with Mushrooms and Spinach (phase 2 or 3) Spicy Slow Cooker Soup with Ground Turkey, Pinto Beans, Red Bell Pepper, and Green Chiles (all phases) Ground Turkey and Bean Stew with Cumin, Green Chiles, and Cilantro (all phases) Leftover Turkey, Mushroom, and Wild Rice Soup (phase 2 or 3) Turkey Barley Soup (phase 2 or 3) Leftover Turkey Soup with Double Mushrooms (leave out carrots for phase 1, can add barley or rice for phase 2 or 3) Leftover Turkey and Sweet Potato Soup with Black Beans and Lime (all phases) Turkey and Wild Rice Soup with Cabbage, Parsley, and Sage (phase 2 or 3) Turkey and Cannellini Bean Soup with Rosemary and Sweet Potatoes (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Winter Squash Slow Cooker Thai-Inspired Butternut Squash Soup with Red Bell Pepper, Lime, and Cilantro (phase 2 or 3) Autumn Harvest Soup with Butternut Squash, Kale, and Farro (phase 2 or 3) Spicy Vegetarian Butternut Squash Soup with Black Beans, Red Bell Peppers, and Cilantro (phase 2 or 3) Soup or Stew with Zucchini Italian Sausage and Zucchini Soup (phase 2 or 3 or all phases if you leave out the macaroni) White Bean Soup with Roasted Turkey Italian Sausage, Zucchini, and Basil ( all phases ) Zucchini and Yellow Squash Soup with Rosemary and Parmesan (all phases)

Source: kalynskitchen.blogspot.com

Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} What Les Halles is the Recipes to Rival challenge of the month? It's Anthony Bourdain's version of coq au vin. He describes this dish as "an old, tough bird that you have to drown in wine to get to taste good." Unfortunately, there's more to it than that. There are several disparate steps to this recipe. There is, of course, the braising of the chicken, but the completed dish is enhanced by separate preparations of onions and mushrooms that require special care. The end product can be quite lovely. My problem? My culinary skills, whatever they are, were honed in the 70's and early 80's of the last century. That means I've made a lot of coq au vin and have some very firm opinions as to how it should be prepared. The hard part was keeping my changes to a minimum and preparing the recipe as it was written. I think I did fairly well. Change number one; the recipe called for a stewing hen. Local butchers laughed at me, so I used a 3-1/2 pound free range chicken. Change number two; I substituted a good shiraz for the burgundy wine that's normally used because I prefer to drink shiraz. Change number three; I added a quantity of thick (almost jelly-like) chicken stock to cover the chicken as it braised. Change number four; I increased the amount of bacon used in the recipe to 6-ounces, but blanched the lardons before adding them to the pot. Change number five; I used thawed, frozen pearl onions instead of fresh. My family can deftly move onions from one side of the plate to another before burying them under chicken bones, so the onions are just for show and I refuse to kill myself preparing them. Change number six; I added 1 tablespoon of tomato paste to kill the purple color of the wine that caused the chicken to look black and blue. I also reduce the sauce by half before napping the chicken and vegetables. Technically, when a young chicken is used to replace the stewing hen the dish should be called braised chicken, not coq au vin. I'll never forget how the use of a young bird offended Andre Soltner when he judged a Top Chef episode. If you have time and would like to prepare coq au vin in the classical manner, you'll love this recipe. It is delicious, but it does take time that includes a 24 hour marination. My changes can be identified by red print. The original recipe can be found at Recipes to Rival . This months challenge is being hosted by founders Temperance of High on the Hog and Lori of Lipsmacking Goodness . Coq au Vin from the Les Halles Cookbook, by Anthony Bourdain Ingredients: 1 bottle/1 liter plus 1 cup/225 ml of red wine - I used Rosemont shiraz 1 onion, cut into a 1-inch/2.5 cm dice 1 carrot, cut into ¼-inch/6-mm slices 1 celery rib, cut into ½ inch/1-cm slices 4 whole cloves 1 tbs/14 g whole black peppercorns 1 bouquet garni - a bay leaf, 3 sprigs of thyme and 4 sprigs parsley tied in a large coffee filter 1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 to 3 cups reduced chicken stock 1 whole chicken, about 3.5 lb/1.35 kg, “trimmed” – meaning guts, wing tips and neckbone removed salt and freshly ground pepper 1 tbs/28 ml olive oil 6 tbs/75 g butter, softened 1 tbs/14 g flour ¼ lb/112 g lardons - I used 6-oz. blanched lardons ½ lb/ 225 g small, white button mushrooms, stems removed 12 pearl onions, peeled - I used 1 cup thawed, frozen pearl onions pinch of sugar Directions: 1) The day before beginning to cook, combine the bottle of red wine, the diced onion, sliced carrots, celery, cloves, peppercorns, and bouquet garni in a large deep bowl. Add the chicken and submerge it in the liquid so that all of it is covered. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. 2) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat it dry. Put it aside. Strain the marinade through the fine strainer, reserving the liquids and solids separately. Season the chicken with salt and pepper inside and out. In the large Dutch oven, heat the oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter until almost smoking, and then sear the chicken, turning it with the tongs to evenly brown it. Once browned, it should be removed from the pot and set it aside again. Add the reserved onions, celery, and carrot to the pot and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and mix well with the wooden spoon so that the vegetables are coated. Now stir in the reserved strained marinade. Stir in tomato paste. Put the chicken back in the pot, along with the bouquet garni. Add thick chicken broth to cover chicken. Bring to a simmer; cover pot and bake for 1 hour and ten minutes. 3) While chicken braises in oven, cook the bacon lardons in the small sauté pan over medium heat until golden brown. Remove the bacon from the pan and drain it on paper towels, making sure to keep about 1 tablespoon/14 g of fat in the pan. Saute the mushroom tops in the bacon fat until golden brown. Set them aside. Now, in the small saucepan, combine the pearl onions, the pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and 2tablespoons/28 g of butter. Add just enough water to just cover the onions; then cover the pan with the parchment paper trimmed to the same size of the pan. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until the water has evaporated. Keep a close eye on it. Remove the paper cover and continue to cook until the onions are golden brown. Set the onions aside and add the remaining cup/225 ml of red wine along with salt and pepper and reduce over medium-high heat until thick enough to coat the back of the spoon. 4) When the chicken is cooked through – meaning tender, the juice from the thigh running clear when pricked – carefully remove from the liquid, cut into quarters, and arrange on the deep serving platter. Strain the cooking liquid (again). Return to a pan and cook until sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon. Add reduced red wine. Add the bacon, mushrooms, and pearl onions, adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons/28 g of butter. Pour sauce over the chicken. Yield: 4 servings.

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

4 tablespoons butter 8 leeks , white part only, cleaned and thinly sliced 2 medium potatoes , cut into small cubes 2 cups chicken stock 2 cups heavy cream 4 fresh chives , finely chopped 1 pinch nutmeg salt and fresh pepper 1 I a large, heavy bottom pot, melt butter over medium-low heat. Once butter is melted, add the leeks and sweat for 5 minutes, making sure they do not take on any color. 2 Add potatoes and cook for a minute or two, stirring a few times. 3 Stir in the chicken broth and bring to a boil. 4 Reduce heat to a simmer. Cook on low heat, gently simmering for 35 minutes, or until the leeks and potatoes are very soft. Allow to cool for a few minutes. 5 Slowly, and in SMALL batches, puree the soup at a high speed in the blender. Do this bit by bit, never filling the blender too high. Make sure the benders lid is on, and lean on the top when you turn on. If not the burn you will get is awful, and a most frequent accident in even professional kitchens. 6 Return soup to the cooking pot and whisk in cream and nutmeg. Season with salt and pepper. Return to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook 5 minutes. If you want to thin soup out, add more broth, if needed. 7 Transfer soup to the mixing bowl an chill over the ice bath, stirring occasionally. When soup is at Room temperature, and only at room temperature, cover in plastic wrap and put int the refrigerator to cool. 8 Check seasoning, sprinkle with chives and serve in chilled bowls. 9 This soup DOES get better over time. Keep covered with plastic, not foil in the refrigerator, or it will pick up other tastes.

Source: food.com

2 lbs pork belly, cut into 2 in cubes (5 cm) 1 lb pork shoulder, cut into 2 in cubes (5cm) 4 cups water 1 bouquet garni (1 sprig flat parsley, 2 sprigs of fresh thyme, 1 bay leaf -all tied with a string so its easy to ret) 1 teaspoon salt 1 pinch black pepper 1 lb pork fat, cut into thin slices 1 Place the pork belly and shoulder in a heavy bottomed pot. Add water and the bouquet garni and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally. 2 After 6 hours, stir in the salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Discard the bouquet garni. 3 Once the meat is cooled enough to handle, transfer it to a mixing bowl, using forks, shred the meat (not mush, SHREDS is the key) 4 Shovel some still warm pork into your mouth -- you know you want to. 5 Divide the mixture among several small containers. Top each portion with a slice or two of pork fat to completely cover it, fold the mixture together a bit then wrap each container in plastic wrap. 6 Place in the refrigerator and let them sit for 3 days before serving. Don't cheat on the 3 days because it just gets better as the flavors marry up!

Source: food.com

6 tablespoons butter 1 onion , thinly sliced 12 ounces button mushrooms , halved 4 cups chicken stock 1 sprig parsley 2 ounces sherry wine salt and pepper 1 Over medium heat, melt two tablespoons of the butter in a saucepan. Toss in the onion and cook until soft but not browned. 2 Toss in the remaining butter and then add the mushrooms. Cook for 8 minutes. 3 Pour in the chicken stock, add the parsley, and bring to a boil. When bubbling, reduce to a simmer and cook for an hour. 4 Pour soup into a blender (you might need to do this in stages), and process until smooth. Return to the saucepan and bring to a simmer. Pour in the sherry, and season with salt and pepper.

Source: food.com

2 lbs pork belly, cut into 2 in cubes (5 cm) 1 lb pork shoulder, cut into 2 in cubes (5cm) 4 cups water 1 bouquet garni (1 sprig flat parsley, 2 sprigs of fresh thyme, 1 bay leaf -all tied with a string so its easy to ret) 1 teaspoon salt 1 pinch black pepper 1 lb pork fat, cut into thin slices 1 Place the pork belly and shoulder in a heavy bottomed pot. Add water and the bouquet garni and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally. 2 After 6 hours, stir in the salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Discard the bouquet garni. 3 Once the meat is cooled enough to handle, transfer it to a mixing bowl, using forks, shred the meat (not mush, SHREDS is the key) 4 Shovel some still warm pork into your mouth -- you know you want to. 5 Divide the mixture among several small containers. Top each portion with a slice or two of pork fat to completely cover it, fold the mixture together a bit then wrap each container in plastic wrap. 6 Place in the refrigerator and let them sit for 3 days before serving. Don't cheat on the 3 days because it just gets better as the flavors marry up!

Source: food.com

6 tablespoons butter 1 onion , thinly sliced 12 ounces button mushrooms , halved 4 cups chicken stock 1 sprig parsley 2 ounces sherry wine salt and pepper 1 Over medium heat, melt two tablespoons of the butter in a saucepan. Toss in the onion and cook until soft but not browned. 2 Toss in the remaining butter and then add the mushrooms. Cook for 8 minutes. 3 Pour in the chicken stock, add the parsley, and bring to a boil. When bubbling, reduce to a simmer and cook for an hour. 4 Pour soup into a blender (you might need to do this in stages), and process until smooth. Return to the saucepan and bring to a simmer. Pour in the sherry, and season with salt and pepper.

Source: food.com

4 tablespoons butter 8 leeks , white part only, cleaned and thinly sliced 2 medium potatoes , cut into small cubes 2 cups chicken stock 2 cups heavy cream 4 fresh chives , finely chopped 1 pinch nutmeg salt and fresh pepper 1 I a large, heavy bottom pot, melt butter over medium-low heat. Once butter is melted, add the leeks and sweat for 5 minutes, making sure they do not take on any color. 2 Add potatoes and cook for a minute or two, stirring a few times. 3 Stir in the chicken broth and bring to a boil. 4 Reduce heat to a simmer. Cook on low heat, gently simmering for 35 minutes, or until the leeks and potatoes are very soft. Allow to cool for a few minutes. 5 Slowly, and in SMALL batches, puree the soup at a high speed in the blender. Do this bit by bit, never filling the blender too high. Make sure the benders lid is on, and lean on the top when you turn on. If not the burn you will get is awful, and a most frequent accident in even professional kitchens. 6 Return soup to the cooking pot and whisk in cream and nutmeg. Season with salt and pepper. Return to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook 5 minutes. If you want to thin soup out, add more broth, if needed. 7 Transfer soup to the mixing bowl an chill over the ice bath, stirring occasionally. When soup is at Room temperature, and only at room temperature, cover in plastic wrap and put int the refrigerator to cool. 8 Check seasoning, sprinkle with chives and serve in chilled bowls. 9 This soup DOES get better over time. Keep covered with plastic, not foil in the refrigerator, or it will pick up other tastes.

Source: food.com

Recently, I synched my Apple TV with my Flickr account so that when the screensaver comes on, all of my pictures on there–over 28,000–dance across the screen. And, wouldn’t you know it, most of those pictures are pictures of food. In fact, when I open my iPhoto and try to find pictures of me and Craig or me and my family, I have to fight my way through a tangled web of food imagery; portraits of dinners and lunches and breakfasts past. Recently, though, as I watched these images scan past on the TV in my living room, I began to have a thought: these pictures of the food that I make actually reveal something about me. But what, exactly? Well, for starters, I think these pictures show that I’m not fussy. This salad, for example, isn’t molded or mounded or presented in a martini glass. It’s not overly worked; it’s just a jumble of good ingredients that I thought would taste good together. Still, there’s thought that went into it, a certain amount of editing: fennel and apples pair nicely, arugula and Parmesan help things along. But the radishes I got in my CSA wouldn’t really fit in here, would they, so I left them out. I guess that’s not apparent in the picture, but it’s something that helps explain what you’re seeing. Toasted walnuts make sense here, peanuts probably not. So add “thoughtfulness” to “not fussy” and you get two character traits that you can learn about me from this salad picture. I can see how this exercise might teeter over into the absurd: Oh mussels and clams? That must mean I love the sea, that I’ve disavowed my Jewish heritage (shellfish! not Kosher), that I’m experimenting with bisexuality because of the vaginal implications. Ahem. Yeah, I see how that’s taking things too far. And yet I can’t help but think that this big pot of mollusks you see in the picture above does reveal something about me and my style of cooking; it’s loose, it’s exciting (note the red chile), it’s comforting, it’s slightly exotic (hey, those are cockles). It’s a cool moment when your food begins to reflect who you are. Which raises the question: can you change who you are by changing how you cook? I certainly think so. For example, are you a penny pincher? Is it hard to justify buying the farmer’s market heirloom tomatoes when the supermarket tomatoes are half the price? Well, buy the heirloom tomatoes anyway and see if that loosens you up a bit. Or, conversely, if you’re a spendthrift, buying way more than you need for every meal, try cooking out of your refrigerator or pantry one night and see what you come up with. Being resourceful in the kitchen may spill over into other areas of your life. Same goes for how you handle fat and salt: if you’ve been stingy with it in the past, for fear of gaining weight, be more generous next time around to see how it improves your cooking (and your spirit and the spirit of everyone eating your food); if, on the other hand, you’re a little heavy handed with the butter, pull back to see if you can get away with less to achieve the same result. Maybe that discipline will lead you to the gym and you’ll have six pack abs and a record deal before you know it. Character is revealed through action (I learned that in drama school) and cooking is nothing if not a series of physical actions shaped by character. Paula Deen and Anthony Bourdain both know how to whip cream by hand, but how they go about it will be totally different because of who they are as people; and I think the resulting whipped cream will taste and maybe even look different because of it. So remember, as you cook, this isn’t something to take lightly; every dish that you make is an edible self-portrait. How do you want to be remembered when people look back on the meals you’ve made over the course of your lifetime. As a bowl of Lucky Charms floating in expired milk? Or something a little grander, a little more ambitious, something a little more you.

Source: amateurgourmet.com

Bourbon Butterscotch SauceI don’t like cliques (unless I’m part of it, of course…) and I have to say, one that I’m happy to be a part of is the brotherhood, and sisterhood, of ice cream makers. I wasn’t the first person to write a book, The Perfect Scoop, about making ice cream. But it landed on the cusp of something that was happening: People were rediscovering ice cream. I’ve always dreamed of opening an ice cream shop. And while that ship has probably passed, I’m so happy to see that a lot of people have done so, and quite successfully, I might add.When I first met Doug Quint, he was manning anΒ ice cream truck next to Union Square in Manhattan. Even though another ship has passed – namely, I’ve gotten older – like a couple of millennials, we had chatted via social media and I thought it’d be fun to meet. When I arrived, the lineΒ stretched halfway down the block. And in Manhattan, that’s a city block between two avenues, which is huge, mind you. I waited 20 minutes and barely moved.Because I have zero patience, twenty minutes to me is an eternity and hopefully you’re never stuck nextΒ to me on an airplane, because things get a little weird in my row after that twenty-minute mark. So I decided to head back another time. However I could not leave without saying hi and took a moment to knock on the back window of the truck, where Doug was swamped, scooping and saucing like a madman.He leaned out and gave me a big hug, and told me to meet him at the shop that he and Bryan Petroff they were just finishing and he gave me a massive slap across the face. I figured that was the initiation to the brotherhood (or sisterhood) of ice cream makers. So if you want to know how you can join, plan to have some painkillers nearby. It was the slap that was heard around the world and now Doug and Bryan no longer roll around inΒ their ice cream truck, but instead are swirling it up in one of their unicorn and rainbow-filledΒ Big Gay Ice Cream shopsΒ in New York City, with another in Philadelphia, and more planned in other cities to spread the word of superiorΒ soft-serve ice cream. Yes, those fiery preachers were right: These guys are out toΒ recruit!AfterΒ the swelling had gone down, I realized my initiation – or perhaps hazing – was complete. And I was happy to visit the store now that it’s open, and thriving. I spent an afternoon behind the counter with Doug, who got his master’s degree fromΒ Julliard music school as a bassoonist, and people of all ilks came in: gangs of teenagers after school, businessmen in grey suits, moms with kids in strollers, tourist couples with cameras around their necks, some guy who looked like a famous movie producer, and a few other assorted New York characters.Bryan and Doug just came out with their first book, Big Gay Ice Cream. It’s not just a recipe book (as Doug, jokingly – I think, told me, “We just took all your recipes, and used ’em…”) butΒ a fun-filled romp high, written like a high school yearbook, the kind we all wish we had, instead of the ones we ended up with. There’s no talk of hazing in the book, although I did lend a quote for it. As didΒ notables like Rachael Ray, Anthony Bourdain, Anne Burrell (who was at the opening party for the book, as was I, whereΒ I was truly astounded by her gravity-defyingΒ hair in person – you go girl!), Tommy Lee, and Gail Simmons,Β although none of them mentioned “soft serve” and “Viagra” together, like I did. Which makes me think that that’s why I don’t have my own television show, come to think of it.With this book, you can make a Magic Shell sauce that crackles when it hardens on top of your ice cream, with no dubious ingredients. You can learn the secrets of their famous Salty Pimp Sundae to make at home. You can whip up a batch Awesomeness Sauce with two kinds of chili powder. I wanted that Rocky Roadhouse sundaeΒ up above, but it was being handed off to a customer and didn’t think it would be polite if I grabbed it out of his hand. And IΒ didn’t want to get slapped again by the owner.The shop uses a special dairy blend for their ice cream fromΒ Ronnybrook farms, a local organic dairy, which also supplies their heavy cream. They try to use as many high-quality products as possible, even going so far as to mix up their own special blend of rainbow sprinkles, going less-heavy on the yellow, and dialing up the other colors, until they are exactly the right proportions to ensure thatΒ each customer gets a beautiful, and well-curated, rainbow of happiness with each cone.This bourbon butterscotch sauce is one of their most popular toppings. And it’s easy to see why.Β It contains two of my favorite ingredients: butterscotch and bourbon, melded together in one creamy-rich sauce, spiked with a big hit of bourbon. It’s thickΒ enough to beΒ the perfect, sweet-boozy topping for a scoop – or swirl – of your favorite ice cream.To make it at home, if you don’t have magic unicorns looking out for you, it’s important to use a very large potΒ to make this. Doug perhaps trustsΒ in the magic of his unicornsΒ and used a regular large saucepanΒ for the sauce, that bubbled up furiously to the top, but settled down after a bit and didn’t overflow. Because this pro knew exactly how high it would go.But to avoid spills, I’d use a Dutch oven or similar-sized pot. It makes a lot of sauce, but any extra could be jarred up and given as gifts. And next time you’re in New York City or Philadelphia, I recommend stopping in one of their shops. Bryan and Doug have made ice cream fun again, not that it ever wasn’t, but they’veΒ definitely taken it to another level. Which is whereΒ this sauce took me, when I hadΒ my first lickΒ of it. Adapted from Big Gay Ice Cream by Bryan Petroff and Doug QuintThis makes a big batch of sauce. But in case you’re not running an ice cream truck, feel free to cut it in half. It’s really wonderful spooned over – well, everything. Even spooned up right out of the bowl once it’s cooled down. For those who’d like to try it with another liquor, dark rum or another favorite could take it in a different direction. For those wanting to omit the alcohol, you can add a vanilla bean split lengthwise in addition to the vanilla extract. A splash more cream (or water) might be necessary at the end, to thin it out.Sauces such as this tend to boil up, so although Doug used a large saucepan, I recommend a bigger pot, such as a Dutch oven. And watch it closely while it cooks. If it threatens to boil up and over, remove it from the heat and let it simmer down before continuing to cook it further.8 ounces (225g) unsalted butter cubed1 pound (2ΒΌ packed cups, 450g) dark brown sugar1/4 cup (60ml) dark corn syrup, or rice, malt, or golden syrup1 cup (250ml) heavy cream1/2 teaspoon flaky sea or kosher salt1 teaspoon vanilla extract1/2 cup (125ml) bourbon, plus additional for finishing the sauce. In a large pot, heat the butter, brown sugar, corn syrup, heavy cream, salt, vanilla and Β½ cup bourbon, stirring until smooth. Continue to cook the sauce over medium-low heat, stirring frequently with a heatproof spatula, until the brown sugar has melted. Continue cooking for about 15 minutes, watching it carefully and stirring occasionally, until the sauce has thickened and reduced. It’s done when the sauce is thick enough to coat a spatula when you lift it.2. Remove from heat and when it’s cooled down enough to taste, add additional bourbon, and more salt if necessary, to taste. Adding bourbon to very hot butterscotch may cause it to boil up so it’s best to wait until it’s cooled down a bit. And you don’t want to burn your tongue, so please be patient – although I know it’s hard. Serving and Storage: Serve warm over ice cream. The butterscotch sauce can be refrigerated for up to two weeks. Rewarm over low heat in a saucepan, stirring constantly.You might also like Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream recipe Chocolate Ice Cream Vegan Strawberry Ice Cream Categories: Dining & Travel Extras Ice Cream New York City RecipesTags: Big Gay Ice Cream bourbon butterscotch Doug Quint heavy cream ice cream New York City Ronnybrook sauce

Source: davidlebovitz.com

How do you cook quinoa? I was recently asked. The answer is simple. Easy. Fast. Rockin'. I cook it in a rice cooker. In fact, quinoa is the easiest no-fuss "grain" you'll ever cook. It's healthy fast food. Cook up a batch ahead of time and you can stir up a fabulous light lunch (like the Lime Quinoa Salad with Mint ) in a New York minute. Well, maybe a Los Angeles minute. No wait. A Venice Beach minute. How to cook quinoa in a rice cooker: 1. Using a fine mesh sieve rinse 1 cup of organic quinoa in cold water. Drain. 2. Dump rinsed quinoa into your rice cooker. 3. Add 2 cups fresh water* see notes. 4. Turn on your rice cooker. That's it. In about fifteen minutes* you'll have hot fluffy quinoa to play with. Quinoa is rather bland on its own and loves flavor spikes. So add herbs etc. My favorite thing to do is stir-fry cooked quinoa with various seasonings- herbs, garlic, spices, onion, etc. I add in fresh veggies and whatever else I might have on hand. Quinoa makes delicious and hearty pilaf, sprightly salads, or a warm and grainy side dish in place of rice. I've even used it to stuff cabbage, acorn squash, peppers and portobello mushroom caps. For those of you without a rice cooker: Add the cup of rinsed organic quinoa to a saucepan add 2 cups fresh water; bring to a boil, lower the heat to low; cover and simmer until cooked. Fluff with a fork. Season while warm and use in salads or stuffing recipes, Store covered, in the fridge, for almost instant meals. Use within three days for best taste. Notes* Start with 2 cups water in a rice cooker. At higher altitudes , use more water-- 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 cups water. High altitude also requires a longer cooking time, generally. If the quinoa turns out too crunchy or nubby you need to up the ratio of water to grain; start by adding another 1/4 cup liquid. I prefer my quinoa soft and tender, fluffed with a fork. Note- r ed and black quinoa may require extra water- especially if it turns out more crunchy than fluffy. Sometimes I add broth to the liquid to boost the flavor of the quinoa- this works especially well when making a savory pilaf or winter quinoa with hearty flavors- onion, mushrooms, eggplant, etc. I don't use broth in my lighter salad style quinoa dishes- but that's my personal taste. Why you might want to try quinoa... Quinoa is very laid back and not full of itself at all. It's not upper crust or snobby, or ultra-cool and exclusive. I imagine Tony Bourdain hates it (he likes to mock vegetarians, you know, which spurs him to demonstrate just how much by eating blow fish, animal tongues and roasted insects on camera fresh from the writhing snake blood tonic and chewing on various goat parts buried in a pit for two days). If it were a movie, quinoa would star a flip-flop wearing Jeff Bridges and insist you call it Dude. Or Duderino if you're not into the whole brevity thing. Besides its worth-its-weight-in-gold gluten-free status, quinoa (sounds like: keen-wa) is a superb source of balanced vegetable protein (so important for vegans) that packs a nutty nutritional punch. It contains nine amino acids- making it a complete vegetable protein. Some call it a super grain (I always envision a blazing red Q and a windswept cape when the word super is touted- a testimony to my visual thinking process) but quinoa, I have to tell you is not a cereal grain, Bubela. It's actually a seed from a plant family that includes beets and spinach. That might- technically- make it a Super Faux Grain. Or Faux Super Grain. I know. It doesn't have the same ring. Do we care? Here are some of my favorite quinoa recipes: Kale Salad with Quinoa, Tangerines and Roasted Almonds Lime Quinoa Salad with Mint Quinoa with Fresh Summer Vegetables Quinoa with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Leeks, and Slivered Almonds Quinoa Salad with Blueberries, Strawberries, and Watermelon Quinoa Salad with Pears, Baby Spinach, Chick Peas in Maple Vinaigrette Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets, Chick Peas + Orange Quinoa Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms Quinoa Mushroom Pilaf Quinoa Taco Salad Red Quinoa with Roasted Butternut Squash + Pecans Stuffed Cabbage with Roasted Sweet Potato and Quinoa Summer Quinoa Salad with Kalamatas and Mint Warm Spinach and Quinoa Salad with Grape Tomatoes Quinoa In Baking: Peanut Butter Quinoa Cookies Quinoa Pumpkin Cookies Quinoa Breakfast Bars with Blueberries Quinoa Breakfast Brownies Quinoa Breakfast Cake Quinoa Chocolate Brownies Quinoa Muffins with Pecans + Dark Chocolate More quinoa recipes from food blogs: At Lydia's Perfect Pantry Quinoa Salad with Tomatoes, Feta and Parsley Susan's Quinoa Vegetable Paella at FatFree Vegan Kitchen Ilva's Quinoa Apple Cake with Cinnamon and Coconut at Lucullian Delights All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you.

Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com



To better explain the experience, I must first introduce you to Elyse. I know her by way of mutual friends; our paths have crossed a handful of times, but ever since I started listening to her new podcast project, I knew she would be someone I would really enjoy. She has the kind of personality that draws people in - warm, confident, intentional, wise, assertive. She has a crazy story herself, one that could lead you towards darkness, but she exudes light. And consequently has the easiest and best laugh I've ever heard. She's a trained therapist, so you expect some of that, but to experience her is different. An extensive education doesn't compare to someones natural strengths. Like I said, I knew I liked her before I attended her retreat last weekend, but what she is building - creating a space for people to feel vulnerable and seen and to be moved out of their own way - is remarkable.

It was essentially two days, with a group of five other women, while Elyse led us through her curriculum of, as she puts it, "looking at a practical evaluation of your history, and the current repercussions of your experiences and core beliefs." We wrote a letter to our younger selves, broke down a timeline of our own lives, shared stories with each other that near broke us - stories of loss and abuse and silence and shame - each woman had something to share from such different perspectives and circumstance. I left feeling like I had untangled a few things that were leaving callouses on my heart. I left feeling motivated about how to practically move towards what I need - both professionally and personally. One of the exercises had a line that stuck with me: "you are already the woman you want to be." I needed a push out of my head, out of some old stories and self doubt to believe that. Go for it! Do it! Have the conversation. Engage in the conflict instead of always keeping peace. Start the business.

On the heels of the terrible loss of Anthony Bourdain, I feel responsible to point you towards soul food just as much as I do literal food. This past weekend was that for me. In my experience, pulling things out of your head, into the light and looking at them with another perspective, goes a long way towards putting them back under your control rather than the other way around. The internet sells us things all day long; promising things to fix our insecurities. There is quieter messaging about seeking connection, so I'll say this for whomever may need to hear it - invest in the friendships, invite people over, say what you need, spend the money on a therapist, ditch the life sucking boyfriend, take the risk, get down and play.

It's actually pretty difficult to put it all to words honestly, but I'm still riding my high of bringing some power back to me, and I want to give some of that to you. You are enough. You are capable. You are smart and beautiful and worthy.“Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart. Try to love the questions themselves, like locked rooms and like books written in a foreign language. Do not now look for the answers. They cannot now be given to you because you could not live them. It is a question of experiencing everything. At present you need to live the question. Perhaps you will gradually, without even noticing it, find yourself experiencing the answer, some distant day.”

― Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet BABY KALE SALAD WITH CHERRIES, MARINATED LENTILS + GOAT CHEESE

Serves 2-4

I'm into having a salad special and eating a few days in a row. I prep the components, then it is just ready to throw together with little fuss. In this case, I double up the dressing, cherries pitted and halved, lentils marinated, clean lettuce stocked. Then when it comes to making a salad, it takes 2 minutes instead of starting from scratch.

Swap in peaches for cherries as needed, their seasonal window is short. Grilled salmon or chicken works on here too, otherwise it's great and easy as is.

 INGREDIENTSmaple mustard vinaigrette1 Tbsp. dijon mustard1 Tbsp. maple syrup1 small shallot, minced1/4 cup apple cider vinegar1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil1/2 tsp. sea salt and peppertip of dried herbs - basil, oregano, Italian blend, whatever 1 cup cooked lentils1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar1/3 cup chopped parsley1 garlic clove, mincedsalt and pepper 4 cups/5 oz. baby kale1 cup pitted and halved cherries4 ounces soft goats cheese1/2 cup toasted almonds INSTRUCTIONS

Put all the dressing ingredients in a jar with a lid and shake it all together (I clean out old nut butter and jam jars to store condiments). Set aside.

Mix the lentils, oil, vinegar, parsley, garlic and a generous pinch of salt and pepper together and stir to mix. This can be done a day or two in advance and kept covered in the fridge.

Toss the greens and cherries in desired amount of dressing. Top with a scoop of the lentils, goat cheese and almonds.

Source: sproutedkitchen.com

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