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6 hard-boiled eggs , cooled and peeled 1/2-1 teaspoon whole pink peppercorns, divided 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole white peppercorns 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorn 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole green peppercorn 1/2 teaspoon caper liquid 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/8-1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 pinch sugar 1 Slice the eggs in half from top to bottom. Scoop the yolks into a medium mixing bowl and lay the whites aside. 2 Place all of the peppercorns, except 1/4-1/2 teaspoon of the pink peppercorns, into a spice grinder and process until ground well. Add the ground peppers, caper liquid, mayonnaise, mustard, salt and sugar to the egg yolks and using a fork, stir to thoroughly combine. 3 Place the mixture into a zip-top plastic bag and cut a small hole at one of the corners. Pipe the mixture into each of the white halves. 4 Coarsely grind the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of pink peppercorns and use to garnish the top of each egg. 5 Chill for at least 1 hour in the refrigerator before serving.

Source: food.com

4 lbs chicken carcasses, including necks and backs 1 large onion , quartered 4 carrots , peeled and cut in half 4 celery ribs , cut in half 1 leek , white part only, cut in half lengthwise 10 sprigs fresh thyme 10 sprigs fresh parsley , with stems 2 bay leaves 8 peppercorns 2 garlic cloves , peeled 2 gallons cold water 1 Place chicken, vegetables, and herbs and spices in 12-quart stockpot. Set opened steamer basket directly on ingredients in pot and pour over water. Cook on high heat until you begin to see bubbles break through the surface of the liquid. 2 Turn heat down to medium low so that stock maintains low, gentle simmer. Skim the scum from the stock with a spoon or fine mesh strainer every 10 to 15 minutes for the first hour of cooking and twice each hour for the next 2 hours. Add hot water as needed to keep bones and vegetables submerged. Simmer uncovered for 6 to 8 hours. 3 Strain stock through a fine mesh strainer into another large stockpot or heatproof container discarding the solids. Cool immediately in large cooler of ice or a sink full of ice water to below 40 degrees. Place in refrigerator overnight. 4 Remove solidified fat from surface of liquid and store in container with lid in refrigerator for 2 to 3 days or in freezer for up to 3 months. Prior to use, bring to boil for 2 minutes. Use as a base for soups and sauces.

Source: food.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... I'll be featuring several Easter breads over the next few weeks, and I thought this would be a good recipe with which to begin the series. It's the easiest of the lot to make and it will be doing double duty as a table prize and centerpiece at an upcoming church luncheon. Those of you who are long-term readers of One Perfect Bite probably remember the Flower Pot Bread that was used in the same way. This year, however, I was asked to find a bread that was edible as well as decorative. I found this recipe at Allrecipes and it was just what I was looking for. Fortunately, this will be a group effort and my responsibility is limited to demonstrating how the bread is made. The real work will be done by a dozen other gals who will actually bake the coffee rings. I don't anticipate there will be any problems if the recipe instructions are followed, but this bread differs from some of the others that are floating around. The eggs that are inserted into the dough are not cooked prior to baking. That means they must be carefully handled when they are dyed. This braid is especially attractive when the eggs are intensely colored, but pale or brightly hued, they must be thoroughly dry before they are inserted into the dough. Moisture will cause them to bleed and spoil the appearance of the bread. Alton Brown has a recipe in which eggs are baked rather than boiled or steamed. I'm including a link to it, here , because it's a technique you might want to use with your Easter eggs. This bread is best served freshly made but it will keep a day or so if you intercept the eggs before serving. Here's the recipe. Braided Easter Egg Bread ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Allrecipes.com Ingredients: 2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided 1/4 cup white sugar 1 teaspoon salt 2-1/4 teaspoons (1 package) active dry yeast 2/3 cup milk 2 tablespoons butter 2 eggs 4 to 5 uncooked eggs, dyed and thoroughly dried 2 tablespoons butter, melted Directions: 1) Combine 1 cup flour, sugar,salt and yeast in a large bowl. Mix well. 2) Combine milk and butter in a small saucepan and heat until milk is warm and butter is softened but not melted. 3) Gradually add liquid mixture to flour mixture, stirring constantly. Beat in eggs and 1/2 cup of reserved flour. Add remaining 1 cup flour in two parts, stirring well after each addition. When dough comes together turn onto a floured surface and knead until dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. 4) Lightly oil a large bowl, place dough in bowl and turn to coat all surfaces with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 1 hour. 5) Deflate dough and turn it out on a lightly floured surface. Divide dough into two equal size rounds; cover and let rest for 10 minutes. Roll each round into a long rope about 36 inches long and 1-1/2 inches thick. Use ropes to form a loosely braided ring, with spaces to insert eggs. Seal ends of ring and transfer to a lightly buttered baking sheet. Use fingers to slide eggs between braids of dough. Cover loosely with a damp towel and let rise in a warm spot until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. 6) Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees F. When dough has doubled in size, brush with melted butter and bake for 50 to 55 minutes, or until golden brown. Let sit for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool. Yield: 1 ring. One Year Ago Today: TapenadeTwo Ways - Black and Green Olive Spreads Two Years Ago Today: Avgolemono - Greek Lemon Chicken Soup

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

2 1/2 lbs red potatoes 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 3/4 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon mustard powder 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon 1/2 tablespoon very thinly sliced garlic 3 tablespoons fine chopped cornichons (gherkins) 1/2 cup small dice red onion 1/2 cup thinly sliced celery 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 Place potatoes into a large heavy-bottomed pot. Cover with cold water and place over medium heat. Cover the pot and bring to a boil. Immediately reduce heat and remove lid. Gently simmer until potatoes are fork tender. Drain and place into an ice bath to cool. 2 Remove skin by rubbing with a tea towel. 3 Slice potatoes into rounds and place into a zip top bag. 4 Add the vinegar and toss to coat all of the potatoes. Place the bag into the refrigerator overnight. 5 In a large mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, mustard, parsley, tarragon, garlic, cornichons, onions, and celery. 6 Once evenly combined, add the potatoes and season with salt and pepper. 7 Let the salad chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour before serving.

Source: food.com

10 sweet onions (like Vidalias) or 10 a combination of sweet and red onions 3 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups white wine 10 ounces canned beef consomme 10 ounces chicken broth 10 ounces apple cider (unfiltered is best) bouquet garni , thyme sprigs, bay leaf and parsley 1 loaf country bread kosher salt ground black pepper 1 dash cognac (optional) 1 cup fontina or 1 cup gruyere cheese , grated 1 Trim the ends off each onion then slice from end to end. Remove peel and finely slice into half moon shapes. Set electric skillet to 300 degrees and add butter. Once butter has melted add a layer of onions and sprinkle with a little salt. Repeat layering onions and salt until all onions are in the skillet. Do not try stirring until onions have sweated down for 15 to 20 minutes. After that, stir occasionally until onions are dark mahogany and reduced to approximately 2 cups. This should take 45 minutes to 1 hour. Do not worry about burning. 2 Add enough wine to cover the onions and turn heat to high, reducing the wine to a syrup consistency. Add consume, chicken broth, apple cider and bouquet garni. Reduce heat and simmer 15 to 20 minutes. 3 Place oven rack in top 1/3 of oven and heat broiler. 4 Cut country bread in rounds large enough to fit mouth of oven safe soup crocks. Place the slices on a baking sheet and place under broiler for 1 minute. 5 Season soup mixture with salt, pepper and cognac. Ladle soup into crocks leaving one inch to the lip. Place bread round, toasted side down, on top of soup and top with grated cheese. Broil until cheese is bubbly and golden, 1 to 2 minutes.

Source: food.com

8 ounces Italian bread, day old, approx 1/2 a standard loaf 3 garlic cloves , mashed 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil , divided 2 large eggs 2 heads romaine lettuce hearts fresh ground black pepper , 7 grinds 1/2 small lemon , juiced 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 4 ounces parmesan cheese , freshly grated 1 Heat oven to 350 degrees. 2 Cut the bread into 3/4-inch cubes and spread on a half sheet pan. Bake until thoroughly dry but not brown, 10-12 minutes. Set aside. 3 Bring 2 cups water to a boil in a 2-quart sauce pan. 4 Meanwhile, place the garlic and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt in a mortar and mash with the pestle to make a paste. Add 4 tablespoons of the oil to the paste and mash to combine. Pour the oil through a fine-mesh sieve into a 12-inch sautee pan. Place the pan over medium heat. Add the croutons and saute, tossing constantly until all of the oil is absorbed by the bread and the croutons turn gold, approximately 5 minutes. Set aside. 5 Add the eggs to the boiling water and cook for 1 minute. Immediately transfer to an ice-water bath to stop the cooking. Set aside. 6 In a very large bowl, tear the lettuce and toss, using tongs, with 2 tablespoons of the oil. 7 Sprinkle with the remaining pinch of salt and the pepper. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Toss well. 8 Add the lemon juice and worcestershire sauce, and break in the eggs. Toss until a creamy dressing forms. Toss in the parmesan cheese and serve topped with croutons.

Source: food.com

32 raw tail-on shrimp (21 to 25 count size) 1/4 cup kosher salt 1/4 cup sugar 1 cup water 2 cups ice 1 (14 1/2 ounce) can diced tomatoes , drained 1/2 cup prepared chili sauce 4 tablespoons prepared horseradish 1 teaspoon sugar 3 grinds fresh black pepper 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 dash Old Bay Seasoning 1 Place cleaned shrimp into a bowl with brine and refrigerate mixture for 20 to 25 minutes. While shrimp are brining, place tomatoes, chili sauce, horseradish, sugar, pepper, and salt in food processor and blend until smooth. Refrigerate cocktail sauce until ready to serve. 2 Place a baking sheet or broiler pan under oven broiler and preheat for 5 minutes. Rinse the shrimp under cold water and dry on paper towels. In a large bowl, toss shrimp with olive oil and sprinkle with Old Bay seasoning, if desired. 3 Place shrimp onto a sizzling sheet pan and return to broiler immediately. After 2 minutes, turn the shrimp with a pair of tongs. Return the shrimp to broiler for 1 minute. Transfer to a cold cookie sheet. Refrigerate immediately.

Source: food.com

1 3/4 cups whipping cream 12 ounces quality semi-sweet chocolate chips 3 ounces espresso or 3 ounces strong coffee 1 tablespoon dark rum 4 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin 1 Chill 1 1/2 cups whipping cream in refrigerator. Chill metal mixing bowl and mixer beaters in freezer. 2 In top of a double boiler, combine chocolate chips, coffee, rum and butter. Melt over barely simmering water, stirring constantly. Remove from heat while a couple of chunks are still visible. Cool, stirring occasionally to just above body temperature. 3 Pour remaining 1/4 cup whipping cream into a metal measuring cup and sprinkle in the gelatin. Allow gelatin to "bloom" for 10 minutes. Then carefully heat by swirling the measuring cup over a low gas flame or candle. Do not boil or gelatin will be damaged. Stir mixture into the cooled chocolate and set aside. 4 In the chilled mixing bowl, beat cream to medium peaks. Stir 1/4 of the whipped cream into the chocolate mixture to lighten it. Fold in the remaining whipped cream in two doses. There may be streaks of whipped cream in the chocolate and that is fine. Do not over work the mousse. 5 Spoon into bowls or martini glasses and chill for at least 1 hour. Garnish with fruit and serve.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds 1 tablespoon celery seed 1 bay leaf 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns 2 tablespoons hot sauce 1 cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar 1/4 cup kosher salt 6 garlic cloves , peeled and crushed 2 cups water 1/2 lb ice 1 1/2 lbs boneless pork butt 1 Combine mustard seeds, celery seeds, bay leaf, peppercorns, hot sauce, vinegar, sugar, salt, garlic and water in a saucepan. Place over medium-high heat until boiling, reduce to a simmer, and maintain for 3 minutes. Turn off heat and add ice. 2 Cut pork butt into 2" cubes. Place in a large zip top bag. When the brine is cool, pour it in as well. Press out as much air as possible and seal the bag. Refrigerate for a minimum of 3 days, turning bag a couple of times a day. 3 Keeps 2 weeks in the refrigerator; after that, drain and freeze. Note that this is NOT edible as is; it still has to be cooked!

Source: food.com

8 ounces Italian bread, day old, approx 1/2 a standard loaf 3 garlic cloves , mashed 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil , divided 2 large eggs 2 heads romaine lettuce hearts fresh ground black pepper , 7 grinds 1/2 small lemon , juiced 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 4 ounces parmesan cheese , freshly grated 1 Heat oven to 350 degrees. 2 Cut the bread into 3/4-inch cubes and spread on a half sheet pan. Bake until thoroughly dry but not brown, 10-12 minutes. Set aside. 3 Bring 2 cups water to a boil in a 2-quart sauce pan. 4 Meanwhile, place the garlic and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt in a mortar and mash with the pestle to make a paste. Add 4 tablespoons of the oil to the paste and mash to combine. Pour the oil through a fine-mesh sieve into a 12-inch sautee pan. Place the pan over medium heat. Add the croutons and saute, tossing constantly until all of the oil is absorbed by the bread and the croutons turn gold, approximately 5 minutes. Set aside. 5 Add the eggs to the boiling water and cook for 1 minute. Immediately transfer to an ice-water bath to stop the cooking. Set aside. 6 In a very large bowl, tear the lettuce and toss, using tongs, with 2 tablespoons of the oil. 7 Sprinkle with the remaining pinch of salt and the pepper. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Toss well. 8 Add the lemon juice and worcestershire sauce, and break in the eggs. Toss until a creamy dressing forms. Toss in the parmesan cheese and serve topped with croutons.

Source: food.com

One of the terrible things that well-intentioned food people do all of the time is get bored with things that everyone loves. Because there’s a there’s a near-constant stream of food media coming in, with time the “hot takes” on apple pie begin to feel monotonous, the “cool new thing to do with sweet potatoes” can cause inward groans and pumpkin/pumpkin-spiced things? I’ll let them tell you: “Pumpkin spice has ruined pumpkins,” says Alton Brown. “America has gone entirely too far in its pumpkin spice devotion,” says Eater, with a fair amount of evidence backing it up. The Washington Post likened pumpkin spice lattes to “liquefied fall-scented potpourri.” I, too, fell into this trap, something I hadn’t realized until I Snapchatted* making pumpkin bread a few weeks ago and have never received so many recipe requests. I didn’t get it at first — I mean, pumpkin bread is the most basic thing, right? And Google claims 5.7 million ways to make it. What could I possible add to the conversation? But as I was making it, I got very persnickety about it, bothered by a few things in the recipes I tried. First, none of them really filled out my loaf pan and I wondered why we were settling for less when we always wanted more. Second, I adore brown sugar in most things, but it makes for a rather brownish cake and the versions I made with only white sugar tasted no less awesome. Third, good pumpkin bread is always tender and plush inside, but why can’t it have a crispy lid too, the way my favorite pumpkin muffins do? Finally, small cans of pumpkin have 1 3/4 cups of puree in them. Most recipes use 1 cup pumpkin and I like to go all the way to 1 1/3 cups. That small amount leftover drives me batty. So, I scaled my recipe a little, and then a little more and until I ended up with an insanely towering pumpkin loaf with a crispy crackly impossible-not-to-pick off cinnamon-sugar lid that’s like a snickerdoodle landed on top of a pumpkin bread and if there was ever a time to shake off any pumpkin/pumpkin-spice skepticism, you are in the right place. You’re among friends. Next stop: hayrides, corn mazes, apple picking, flannel shirts, hot apple cider and Don’t say it, Deb! … decorative gourds. * @smittenkitchen, are you following? I hope you do. I’m having so much fun embarrassing myself over there. Also I share meal so-called plans, you know, real ones that include days like last Tuesday with the menu item “nope!” Toronto! I’ll be in Toronto a week from Saturday, 10/22 at Type Books at 7:30 p.m. in conversation with Toronto Star Food Editor Karon Lui. [Details] I’m actually going to be in town all weekend for the Canadian Food Bloggers Conference, which has kindly invited me to keynote, something I’m not terrified about at all, nope. Previously One year ago: Cannoli Pound Cake Two years ago: Better Chocolate Babka Three years ago: Purple Plum Torte Four years ago: Make Your Own Pumpkin Puree and Chicken Noodle Soup Five years ago: Apple Pie Cookies Six years ago: Roasted Eggplant Soup Seven years ago: Breakfast Apple Granola Crisp Eight years ago: Acorn Squash Quesadillas with Tomatillo Salsa Nine years ago: Gazpacho Salsa Ten! years ago: Cook’s Illustrated Classic Brownies And for the other side of the world: Six Months Ago: Carrot Tahini Muffins 1.5 Years Ago: Strawberry Rhubarb Soda Syrup 2.5 Years Ago: Dark Chocolate Coconut Macaroons 3.5 Years Ago: Bee Sting Cake 4.5 Years Ago: Banana Bread Crepe Cake with Butterscotch Pumpkin Bread This is a towering, craggy pumpkin bread with a crisp cinnamon sugar lid that is impossible not to pick off in deeply satisfying bark-like flecks. Trust me, someone in my family notnamingnames did exactly that this morning, and I almost cannot blame them. Very key here is the size of your loaf pan because this will fill out every speck of it before it is done. Mine holds 6 liquid cups; it’s 8×4 inches on the bottom and 9×5 inches on the top. If yours is even slightly smaller or you’re nervous, go ahead and scoop out a little to make a muffin or two. You won’t regret that either. This also uses an excess of cinnamon sugar on top — it’s always too much and I cannot stop because I love the way it spills off when I slice it and then you can slide your slices through the extra. If this is going to bother you, however, go ahead and use half. You can also make this as muffins. It should make about 18 standard ones and you can distribute the cinnamon sugar (perhaps make 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar and 1/2 teaspoons of cinnamon worth) across the tops before you bake them. They should bake for 25 to 30 minutes. I’ve also made this with mashed sweet potatoes and other squashes with success (but if it’s more wet and thus the batter ends up more loose, be caaaaareful as it could throw this towering loaf into a spilling-over situation). And I’ve done it with half whole-wheat flour. Finally, I know someone is going to say “that’s way too much sugar!” but please keep in mind this loaf is gigantic, easily 1.5x a normal one and the sugar is scaled accordingly. You can decrease it if you wish but we have made this now several times and many people have commented about how in-check the sugar level tastes, not over the top at all. Bread1 15-ounce can (1 3/4 cups) pumpkin puree1/2 cup (120 ml) vegetable or another neutral cooking oil or melted butter (115 grams)3 large eggs1 2/3 (330 grams) cups granulated sugar1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder3/4 teaspoon baking soda3/4 teaspoon fine sea or table salt3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamonHeaped 1/4 teaspoon fresh grated nutmegHeaped 1/4 teaspoon ground gingerTwo pinches of ground cloves2 1/4 cups (295 grams) all-purpose flour To Finish1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated sugar1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a 6-cup loaf pan or coat it with nonstick spray. In a large bowl, whisk together pumpkin, oil, eggs and sugar until smooth. Sprinkle baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinanmon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves over batter and whisk until well-combined. Add flour and stir with a spoon, just until mixed. Scrape into prepared pan and smooth the top. In a small dish, or empty measuring cup, stir sugar and cinnamon together. Sprinkle over top of batter. Bake bread for 65 to 75 minutes until a tester poked into all parts of cake (both the top and center will want to hide pockets of uncooked batter) come out batter-free, turning the cake once during the baking time for even coloring. You can cool it in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove it, or cool it completely in there. The latter provides the advantage of letting more of the loose cinnamon sugar on top adhere before being knocked off. Cake keeps at room temperature as long as you can hide it. I like to keep mine in the tin with a piece of foil or plastic just over the cut end and the top exposed to best keep the lid crisp as long as possible.

Source: smittenkitchen.com

It's time once again for another Secret Recipe Club post (I promise the Chocolate Chip Cookie Quest will continue tomorrow). The Secret Recipe Club, hosted by Amanda of Amanda's Cookin', is so cool. Each month, you get assigned to another person's blog and someone else gets assigned to yours. Then, you both get to choose a recipe to make and post. Easy-peasy and totally fun. If you want to get in on the fun too, just click HERE . I've been a longtime follower of Rochelle's blog, The Pretend Chef . She and I have even made each other's recipes before and posted about them. So, I was absolutely thrilled to find out that she was my secret assignment for this month. There was so much to choose from but, after looking through her blog, I finally knew what I wanted to make. You see, a while back, I made Alton Brown's pancakes and posted about how good they were. She then made them and loved them as well. But, two weeks later, she posted about another pancake recipe, one that she said was even lighter and fluffier. Well, I just had to take that challenge, so I decided to make her Classic Pancakes and put them to the test. The recipe is such a simple one. It doesn't require any fancy ingredients or any complicated steps. Yet, even without any razzmatazz, this recipe produces pancakes that are fluffy to the max. Mine rose at least three-quarters of an inch high!!! That's incredible in my book. Spread with a little guava jam, they made the perfect dinner. Even my family agreed that these beat Alton Brown's recipe hands-down. They're definitely a keeper and will be my go-to pancake recipe from here on out. Thanks to you Rochelle, my breakfast will never be the same again. Classic Pancakes (from Good Things for Kids: 63 Fun and Easy Recipes the Whole Family Will Love) 1 3/4 c. all-purpose flour 2 Tbsp. sugar 1 Tbsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. salt 1 1/2 c. milk 2 large eggs 3 Tbsp. vegetable oil (I used melted butter) If using an electric griddle, heat to 325F. In a large bowl, sift flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. In a medium bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, and oil/butter. Pour the liquid mixture over the flour mixture and whisk until combined. Make sure not to overmix the batter. Grease the griddle or skillet. Set skillet on medium. Once hot, pour 1/3 cup batter for each pancake. Add your mix-ins if desired. Flip when small holes about, about 1 1/2-2 min. (mine took about 30 seconds-1 min.). Cook second side until golden. This recipe is linked to: My Meatless Monday Meat Free Monday Hearth n' Soul Hop A Little Birdie Told Me

Source: sweet-as-sugar-cookies.blogspot.com

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