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2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds 1 tablespoon celery seed 1 bay leaf 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns 2 tablespoons hot sauce 1 cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar 1/4 cup kosher salt 6 garlic cloves , peeled and crushed 2 cups water 1/2 lb ice 1 1/2 lbs boneless pork butt 1 Combine mustard seeds, celery seeds, bay leaf, peppercorns, hot sauce, vinegar, sugar, salt, garlic and water in a saucepan. Place over medium-high heat until boiling, reduce to a simmer, and maintain for 3 minutes. Turn off heat and add ice. 2 Cut pork butt into 2" cubes. Place in a large zip top bag. When the brine is cool, pour it in as well. Press out as much air as possible and seal the bag. Refrigerate for a minimum of 3 days, turning bag a couple of times a day. 3 Keeps 2 weeks in the refrigerator; after that, drain and freeze. Note that this is NOT edible as is; it still has to be cooked!

Source: food.com

1 lb tomato 9 cups low sodium chicken broth 3 cups short-grain rice 20 saffron strands 2 sprigs rosemary , leaves stripped from sprigs 3 teaspoons kosher salt , divided 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 lbs chicken quarters 1/2 lb fresh green beans , trimmed and halved 1 cup red bell pepper , chopped 1/2 cup green bell pepper , chopped 2 garlic cloves , minced 1 Spritz 4 to 5 pieces of newspaper with vegetable oil and put in the bottom of a charcoal chimney starter. Fill the chimney with half of the charcoal and light the newspaper. 2 When the charcoal is lightly covered with gray ash, carefully pour onto the bottom grate of a kettle grill and spread evenly. Top with the remaining unlit charcoal, spreading evenly so as not to suffocate the lit charcoal. Set the second grate in the kettle and cover until ready to cook. 3 Meanwhile, halve the tomatoes and remove the seeds to a fine mesh strainer set over a small bowl to catch the juice. Grate the seeded halves on the large hole side of a box grater and discard the skins. Combine the reserved juice and grated tomato and set aside. 4 Warm the chicken broth in a kettle or 4-quart saucepan over high heat until it reaches 200 degrees F. Remove the broth from the heat and cover to keep warm. 5 Combine the rice, saffron, rosemary, 1 teaspoon of the salt, and paprika in a small mixing bowl. 6 Heat the olive oil in the paella pan on the prepared grill. Season the chicken on all sides with the remaining 2 teaspoons of salt. Once the olive oil shimmers, add the chicken and cook until golden brown on both sides, approximately 5 to 6 minutes per side. Move the chicken to the outer edges of the pan. Add the green beans, red bell pepper, green bell pepper and garlic to the center of the pan and cook until they begin to soften and darken in color, approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and their juice and cook until most of the liquid has dissipated and the tomatoes thicken and darken, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. 7 Add the rice mixture to the center of the pan and cook, stirring constantly for 1 minute. 8 Redistribute the chicken pieces on top of the rice. Add 4 cups of the warm chicken broth and stir to distribute the rice evenly in the pan, making sure that all rice is completely submerged in liquid. From this point forward do not stir the paella. 9 After 8 to 9 minutes, when all of the liquid is absorbed and the rice appears dry, add an additional 4 cups of broth. Continue to cook without stirring, until the liquid is absorbed, about 8 to 9 minutes. The rice should be firm to the bite and the grains have a tiny white dot in the center. Add the remaining cup of broth as needed, until the rice is cooked through. Watch the fire to make sure it is heating evenly and adjust the pan to prevent uneven cooking. 10 Remove the pan from the heat, cover with a tea towel and rest for 15 minutes before serving.

Source: food.com

2 quarts water 1 cup kosher salt 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons saltpeter 1 cinnamon stick , broken into several pieces 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 8 whole cloves 8 allspice berries 12 whole juniper berries 2 bay leaves , crumbled 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 2 lbs ice 1 (4 -5 lb) beef brisket , trimmed 1 small onion , quartered 1 large carrot , coarsely chopped 1 stalk celery , coarsely chopped 1 Place the water into a large 6 to 8 quart stockpot along with salt, sugar, saltpeter, cinnamon stick, mustard seeds, peppercorns, cloves, allspice, juniper berries, bay leaves and ginger. 2 Cook over high heat until the salt and sugar have dissolved. 3 Remove from the heat and add the ice. 4 Stir until the ice has melted. 5 If necessary, place the brine into the refrigerator until it reaches a temperature of 45 degrees (I put mine in the refrigerator over night). 6 Once it has cooled, place the brisket in a 2-gallon zip top bag and add the brine. 7 Seal and lay flat inside a container, cover and place in the refrigerator for 10 days. 8 Check daily to make sure the beef is completely submerged and stir the brine. 9 After 10 days, remove from the brine and rinse well under cool water. 10 Place the brisket into a pot just large enough to hold the meat, add the onion, carrot and celery and cover with water by 1-inch. 11 Set over high heat and bring to a boil. 12 Reduce the heat to low, cover and gently simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender. 13 Remove from the pot and thinly slice across the grain. 14 My Crock pot method:. 15 After 10 days, remove from the brine and rinse well under cool water. 16 Place the brisket into bottom of crock pot. 17 Add 5 potatoes cut in half and 1 pound baby carrots. 18 Turn on high and cook for 2 hours. 19 Add whole head of cabbage that you have quartered. 20 Make sure you keep cabbage from touching the crock pot so it will not burn. 21 Cook another 2 hours on high. 22 Slice and serve with the vegetables.

Source: food.com

5 lbs red potatoes 1 lb smoked bacon 1 large white onion 8 eggs 1 cup sugar 2 cups white vinegar 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1 Peel potatoes and cut into half-dollar size slices 1/4" thick or so. If the potato is large, cut it in two lengthwise then slice. Place the slices into a large bowl filled with cold water, keeping the potatoes submerged to prevent browning. 2 Cook bacon, saving all of the drippings. Crumble or chop bacon and place into a bowl, covering bacon and drippings and set aside. Yes, I said save the drippings. All will be revealed to those who are patient and/or hungry. Tip: Use the Alton Brown method of oven-baking the bacon. It's less messy, the bacon cooks more evenly and it conserves more of the drippings for later. Don't know what the Alton Brown method is? Google it. 3 While bacon is cooking, boil eggs until very hard, 15-20 minutes after the water reaches a boil. Shell and chop coarsely. Cover and set aside. 4 While eggs are boiling, chop onion into medium pieces. Place in a colander and rinse under hot water for a minute or so to remove the bitter compounds. 5 Put a large stock pot (12 quart at least) half-filled with water on to boil. (Tip: fill pot with hot tap water - it will cut the boil time considerably) When it reaches a full rolling boil, drain the potato slices and *slowly* dump them into the pot. Cook until just done - soft-ish but still firm enough they won't fall apart when stirred. Al dente, if you will, were such a term applicable to potatoes. Drain. 6 Keep in mind the potatoes will continue too cook in the retained heat for several minutes after taken off the boil. Try to coordinate the other steps to all be ready as sson as the potatoes are done. 7 While potatoes are boiling, quickly combine the bacon crumbles, onion and eggs in a large bowl. In a 4 quart saucepan, heat the reserved bacon drippings (there should be about one cup) on low and when warm add the flour until smooth and all the lumps are gone. Add the sugar and whisk in the vinegar. Heat over medium slowly, gradually increasing the temperature to medium high, until the sauce has thickened to thin mayonnaise consistency. Remove from heat and cover. 8 After the potatoes are drained, put them back into the stock pot (you'll need the room). Add the bacon-egg-onion mix and stir gently until reasonably well combined. Pour the sauce over and stir gently until well-combined, taking care not to damage the potato slices too much. The egg yolk will emulsify into the sauce and create a mayonnaise right in the pot. 9 Making sure your cardiologist is standing by, serve warm aside with any German food - Bratwurst, knockwurst, schnitzel, sauerbraten, with good strong beer. My wife says this potato salad is a meal in its own right. I believe her.

Source: food.com

8 tablespoons unsalted butter , room temperature 1 teaspoon dried parsley 1 teaspoon dried tarragon 1 teaspoon chives 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 4 boneless skinless chicken breast halves 2 large whole eggs , beaten with 1 teaspoon water 2 cups panko bread crumbs , plus 1/4 cup panko bread crumbs 3 cups vegetable oil 1 Combine butter, parsley, tarragon, chives,1 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper in the bowl of a stand mixer. Place mixture on plastic wrap or waxed paper and roll into small log; place in freezer. 2 Place chicken breasts, 1 at a time, between 2 pieces of plastic wrap. Squirt chicken lightly with water and squirt the top of the plastic wrap as well. Pound to no less than 1/8-inch thickness. Season each piece of chicken with salt and pepper. 3 Lay 1 chicken breast on a new piece of plastic wrap and place 1/4 of the compound butter and 1 tablespoon bread crumbs in the center of each breast. Using the plastic wrap to assist, fold in ends of breast and roll breast into a log, completely enclosing the butter; roll very tightly. Repeat with each breast. Place chicken in refrigerator for 2 hours, or up to overnight. 4 Place egg and water mixture in 1 pie pan and 2 cups bread crumbs in a different pie pan. 5 Heat 1/2-inch of vegetable oil in a 12-inch saute pan over medium-high heat until oil reaches 375 degrees F. 6 Dip each breast in the egg mixture and then roll in the bread crumbs. Gently place each breast in oil, sealed-side down, and cook until golden brown, approximately 4 to 5 minutes on each side, until the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees F. Remove to a cooling rack set in sheet pan and allow to drain for 5 to 10 minutes before serving.

Source: food.com

4 smoked turkey legs 1 tablespoon seasoning salt 1 cup hot barbecue sauce 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 Preheat the oven to 450°F. 2 Place the legs in a 13x9-inch baking pan and sprinkle with the seasoned salt. 3 Pour 1 cup of water into the bottom of the pan and cover tightly with aluminum foil. Bake on the middle rack of the oven for 1 hour. 4 After 1 hour, gently uncover the pan and turn the legs over. Continue to bake for another hour. 5 Remove from the oven and drain off any remaining water. 6 Combine the barbecue sauce, brown sugar, and lemon juice in a medium saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and glaze the turkey legs with the sauce.

Source: food.com

1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 red onions , thinly sliced 1 sweet onion , thinly sliced 1/2 tablespoon sugar kosher salt fresh ground black pepper 1/4 cup cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine 1 cup beef stock 1 bay leaf 4 sprigs thyme , leaves only 15 -20 wonton wrappers 1 cup gruyere , grated 1/3 cup parmesan cheese , grated 2 tablespoons butter chives or fresh thyme sprig , for garnish 1 Heat the butter and oil in a sauté pan on medium-low heat. Add the onions, sugar, salt, and pepper, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. You may have to turn your heat down to low if you find them caramelizing too quickly. You want them very soft, but not burnt. You can also use the Alton Brown method: put them in an electric skillet set to 300°F, cover and leave undisturbed for 10 minutes, then start stirring every few minutes. 2 After 30 minutes, add the cognac. Do not pour the cognac directly into the pan from the bottle if there is a live flame; the flame could travel up the pour-stream and into the bottle, causing it to explode. Measure the cognac in a liquid measuring cup, then move the pan off the heat, pour in the cognac, and return the pan to the stove. Let the cognac reduce for 1 minute. Add the wine, beef stock, bay leaf and thyme. Season again with salt and pepper. Simmer on low for another 30 minutes. 3 Set the onions into a strainer over a bowl to cool to room temperature. Reserve both the onions, and the broth that drains from them. 4 Preheat the broiler. Spray two individual gratin dishes with non-stick spray, and stand them on a foil-lined baking sheet (to make for easy clean-up). 5 Take a wonton wrapper in one hand. Dip a finger or small brush in the reserved broth and moisten the entire surface of one side of the wrapper. Place 1 tsp of the onions in the center of the wrapper. Bring all four corners together, pinching and twisting to form a small pouch (called a beggar's purse). Place dumpling, seam side down, into gratin dish. Continue until both dishes are full. 6 Top each dish with half the Gruyère and half the Parmesan. Dot each dish with 1 tbsp of butter. Pop the dishes under the broiler until the cheese is melted, bubbly and beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Poke a toothpick into each dumpling and garnish with chives or thyme sprigs.

Source: food.com

4 ounces soymilk 4 ounces acai juice, grape juice or 4 ounces pomegranate juice 1 frozen banana 4 ounces frozen strawberries 4 ounces frozen blueberries 4 ounces frozen peaches 1 1. Combine the soy milk, juice, and fruit in a blender. Cover and refrigerate overnight or up to 8 hours. 2 2. In the morning or when fruit is thawed, blend fruit on lowest speed and slowly increase to medium speed. 3 3. Once medium speed is reached, blend for one minute. 4 4. Serve. 5 Note: I just copied this from the foodnetwork site but gave this my own flair. I used lactose free milk but don't see why one couldn't use regular, and used black currant juice. I also added some mango and papaya, sort of omitting the peaches almost all together. You can also use blackberries or any type of dark colored berry to get the addition of the antioxidants, but I can imagine this would taste good with any fruit. If you can't find a certain type of fruit in the frozen section, just buy it fresh, cut it up or wash it, then freeze in a plastic bag.

Source: food.com

2 (3 ounce) packages ramen noodles 1/2 cup dried mushroom , chopped 20 large raw shrimp , peel and deveined 1/2 cup finely chopped onion 1/2 cup sliced scallion 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 quart vegetable broth 1/2 cup mirin 1/4 cup soy sauce 4 teaspoons sesame oil 1 Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 2 Divide ramen noodles evenly in the center of each of the 4 pieces of aluminum foil. Stack the following ingredients on top of noodles in this order: mushrooms, shrimp, onions, scallions, red pepper flakes, and salt. Pull sides and corners of the pouch up to form a small basket shape leaving an opening at the top to pour in the liquid. 3 In small bowl, combine vegetable broth, mirin, soy sauce, and sesame oil. Distribute liquid evenly among packs. Press foil together, leaving a small opening to allow steam to escape. Place on cookie sheet and bake in oven for 15 minutes Serve immediately.

Source: food.com

6 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda (check expiration date first) 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 tablespoon kosher salt 2 tablespoons sugar 1 For the Mix:. 2 Combine all of the ingredients for the MIX in a container with a tight fitting lid. 3 Shake to mix. 4 For the Pancakes:. 5 Whisk together the egg whites and the buttermilk in a small bowl. 6 In another bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the melted butter. 7 Combine the buttermilk mixture with the egg yolk mixture in a large mixing bowl and whisk together until thoroughly combined. 8 Pour the liquid ingredients on top of 2 cups of the pancake mix. 9 Using a whisk, mix the batter just enough to bring it together. 10 Don't try to work all the lumps out. 11 Check to see that the griddle is hot by placing a few drops of water onto the griddle. 12 The griddle is ready if the water dances across the surface. 13 Lightly butter the griddle. 14 Wipe off thoroughly with a paper towel. 15 (No butter should be visible.) Gently ladle the pancake batter onto the griddle and sprinkle on fruit if desired. 16 When bubbles begin to set around the edges of the pancake, and the griddle-side of the cake is golden, gently flip the pancakes. 17 Continue to cook 2 to 3 minutes or until the pancake is set. 18 Serve immediately or remove to a towel-lined baking sheet and cover with a towel. 19 Hold in a warm place for 20 to 30 minutes.

Source: food.com

3 ancho chilies , stemmed, seeded and sliced 3 cascabel chiles, stemmed, seeded and sliced 3 dried arbol chiles, stemmed, seeded and sliced 2 tablespoons whole cumin seeds 2 tablespoons garlic powder 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 Toast the chiles and cumin seeds in a cast iron skillet for a few minutes. Don't let them cook too long and inhale the smoke, because you'll get a nasty chemical burn in lungs, nose and throat. 2 let the chiles and seeds cool. 3 place all the ingredients into a blender and blend on the highest speed you blender can dish out. 4 store in an airtight jar. 5 be sure to wash you blender carafe a few times after doing this or you fruit smoothy or margarita will taste like chiles.

Source: food.com

One of the terrible things that well-intentioned food people do all of the time is get bored with things that everyone loves. Because there’s a there’s a near-constant stream of food media coming in, with time the “hot takes” on apple pie begin to feel monotonous, the “cool new thing to do with sweet potatoes” can cause inward groans and pumpkin/pumpkin-spiced things? I’ll let them tell you: “Pumpkin spice has ruined pumpkins,” says Alton Brown. “America has gone entirely too far in its pumpkin spice devotion,” says Eater, with a fair amount of evidence backing it up. The Washington Post likened pumpkin spice lattes to “liquefied fall-scented potpourri.” I, too, fell into this trap, something I hadn’t realized until I Snapchatted* making pumpkin bread a few weeks ago and have never received so many recipe requests. I didn’t get it at first — I mean, pumpkin bread is the most basic thing, right? And Google claims 5.7 million ways to make it. What could I possible add to the conversation? But as I was making it, I got very persnickety about it, bothered by a few things in the recipes I tried. First, none of them really filled out my loaf pan and I wondered why we were settling for less when we always wanted more. Second, I adore brown sugar in most things, but it makes for a rather brownish cake and the versions I made with only white sugar tasted no less awesome. Third, good pumpkin bread is always tender and plush inside, but why can’t it have a crispy lid too, the way my favorite pumpkin muffins do? Finally, small cans of pumpkin have 1 3/4 cups of puree in them. Most recipes use 1 cup pumpkin and I like to go all the way to 1 1/3 cups. That small amount leftover drives me batty. So, I scaled my recipe a little, and then a little more and until I ended up with an insanely towering pumpkin loaf with a crispy crackly impossible-not-to-pick off cinnamon-sugar lid that’s like a snickerdoodle landed on top of a pumpkin bread and if there was ever a time to shake off any pumpkin/pumpkin-spice skepticism, you are in the right place. You’re among friends. Next stop: hayrides, corn mazes, apple picking, flannel shirts, hot apple cider and Don’t say it, Deb! … decorative gourds. * @smittenkitchen, are you following? I hope you do. I’m having so much fun embarrassing myself over there. Also I share meal so-called plans, you know, real ones that include days like last Tuesday with the menu item “nope!” Toronto! I’ll be in Toronto a week from Saturday, 10/22 at Type Books at 7:30 p.m. in conversation with Toronto Star Food Editor Karon Lui. [Details] I’m actually going to be in town all weekend for the Canadian Food Bloggers Conference, which has kindly invited me to keynote, something I’m not terrified about at all, nope. Previously One year ago: Cannoli Pound Cake Two years ago: Better Chocolate Babka Three years ago: Purple Plum Torte Four years ago: Make Your Own Pumpkin Puree and Chicken Noodle Soup Five years ago: Apple Pie Cookies Six years ago: Roasted Eggplant Soup Seven years ago: Breakfast Apple Granola Crisp Eight years ago: Acorn Squash Quesadillas with Tomatillo Salsa Nine years ago: Gazpacho Salsa Ten! years ago: Cook’s Illustrated Classic Brownies And for the other side of the world: Six Months Ago: Carrot Tahini Muffins 1.5 Years Ago: Strawberry Rhubarb Soda Syrup 2.5 Years Ago: Dark Chocolate Coconut Macaroons 3.5 Years Ago: Bee Sting Cake 4.5 Years Ago: Banana Bread Crepe Cake with Butterscotch Pumpkin Bread This is a towering, craggy pumpkin bread with a crisp cinnamon sugar lid that is impossible not to pick off in deeply satisfying bark-like flecks. Trust me, someone in my family notnamingnames did exactly that this morning, and I almost cannot blame them. Very key here is the size of your loaf pan because this will fill out every speck of it before it is done. Mine holds 6 liquid cups; it’s 8×4 inches on the bottom and 9×5 inches on the top. If yours is even slightly smaller or you’re nervous, go ahead and scoop out a little to make a muffin or two. You won’t regret that either. This also uses an excess of cinnamon sugar on top — it’s always too much and I cannot stop because I love the way it spills off when I slice it and then you can slide your slices through the extra. If this is going to bother you, however, go ahead and use half. You can also make this as muffins. It should make about 18 standard ones and you can distribute the cinnamon sugar (perhaps make 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar and 1/2 teaspoons of cinnamon worth) across the tops before you bake them. They should bake for 25 to 30 minutes. I’ve also made this with mashed sweet potatoes and other squashes with success (but if it’s more wet and thus the batter ends up more loose, be caaaaareful as it could throw this towering loaf into a spilling-over situation). And I’ve done it with half whole-wheat flour. Finally, I know someone is going to say “that’s way too much sugar!” but please keep in mind this loaf is gigantic, easily 1.5x a normal one and the sugar is scaled accordingly. You can decrease it if you wish but we have made this now several times and many people have commented about how in-check the sugar level tastes, not over the top at all. Bread1 15-ounce can (1 3/4 cups) pumpkin puree1/2 cup (120 ml) vegetable or another neutral cooking oil or melted butter (115 grams)3 large eggs1 2/3 (330 grams) cups granulated sugar1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder3/4 teaspoon baking soda3/4 teaspoon fine sea or table salt3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamonHeaped 1/4 teaspoon fresh grated nutmegHeaped 1/4 teaspoon ground gingerTwo pinches of ground cloves2 1/4 cups (295 grams) all-purpose flour To Finish1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated sugar1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a 6-cup loaf pan or coat it with nonstick spray. In a large bowl, whisk together pumpkin, oil, eggs and sugar until smooth. Sprinkle baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinanmon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves over batter and whisk until well-combined. Add flour and stir with a spoon, just until mixed. Scrape into prepared pan and smooth the top. In a small dish, or empty measuring cup, stir sugar and cinnamon together. Sprinkle over top of batter. Bake bread for 65 to 75 minutes until a tester poked into all parts of cake (both the top and center will want to hide pockets of uncooked batter) come out batter-free, turning the cake once during the baking time for even coloring. You can cool it in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove it, or cool it completely in there. The latter provides the advantage of letting more of the loose cinnamon sugar on top adhere before being knocked off. Cake keeps at room temperature as long as you can hide it. I like to keep mine in the tin with a piece of foil or plastic just over the cut end and the top exposed to best keep the lid crisp as long as possible.

Source: smittenkitchen.com

Hard boiled eggs that are easy to peel? Use your pressure cooker! Perfect, easily peeled eggs every time. Print Photography Credit: Emma Christensen Like many of you, I abandoned theΒ dream of finding one surefire methodΒ for making consistently perfectΒ hard boiled eggs some time ago. After trying a fewΒ too many “foolproof” tricksΒ with spotty results, I relegatedΒ easy-peel eggs toΒ the same categoryΒ as unicorns and cheap airfare: nice to fantasizeΒ about, but if they were trulyΒ real, you’d think we’dΒ have heard about it by now. But that’s the thing about myths — just when you’ve thrown your hands in the air and walked away, something new comes along to rekindle your hope. Like Fox Mulder, we want to believe. For me, that something newΒ was myΒ pressure cookerΒ and a friend’s improbable suggestion that I try using it to makeΒ a batch of eggs. Just like that, the dream was alive again. I’ve actually been sitting on this revelation for a few months now just because I didn’t trust the evidence of my own eyes: Two eggs or a dozen, fresh eggs or weeks old, white eggs or brown eggs, it didn’t matter. The shells slipped easily off each time, leaving a smooth and pristine hard boiled egg. There are a few theories for why this is. Some say that, similar toΒ steaming eggs, the pressure cooker forces steam inside the egg’s shell during cooking, causingΒ it to separate from the egg white. Alton Brown’s theory is that it’s more aboutΒ the rapid temperature change inside the sealed pot. Either way, it works. Making hard-cooked eggs in the pressure cooker is the only method I’ve found that has worked for me every single time. I based my eggsΒ on the popular “5-5-5” methodΒ for hard-cooked eggs in the Instant Pot.Β The idea is to put your eggs into a steamer basket and sealΒ themΒ inside your pressure cooker along with a cup or so of water. It takes about five minutes for the cooker to come up to high pressure, five minutes to cook the eggs, and then five minutes of natural pressure release before removing the eggs from the cookerΒ — hence the “5-5-5” method. I found that this basic formula worked just fine, though it typically takes my pressure cooker closer to 10 minutes before fully pressurizing. I also decided that I like the texture of 4-minute eggs better than 5-minute eggs. At four minutes, the whites are firm but soft and the yolk is cooked through but still creamy; at five minutes, I felt like the whites started to become rubbery and the yolk was a little chalky. Give it a try both ways and see which you prefer. Also, for those of you with stovetop pressure cookers, I recommend a quicker 3-minute cook time.Β Stovetop pressure cookers can reach a higher pressure than electric cookers and tend to cook food more quickly. (For reference, aΒ friend of mine tested this recipe with her stovetop pressure cooker and her verdict was that 4-minute eggs were fine, but tasted slightly overcooked.) The only un-perfect thing about this way of hard boiling eggs is that, every so often, one of the eggs will crack its shell during cooking. When this has happened to me, it’s usually been during the 5 minute “natural release”Β period after the eggs are already cooked, so the crack is only superficially cosmetic. Not idealΒ if you’re planning to dye a bunch of Easter eggs, of course, but perfectly fine for deviled eggs. If your eggs seem to beΒ cracking more often, or are cracking earlier during cooking before the whites are set, try cooking them at low pressure instead of high pressure. My own tests at low pressure gave inconsistent results, but every pressure cooker is a little different and you might have better luck with yours. The jury is still out onΒ unicorns and affordable airfare, but easy-to-peel eggs, at least, are real. Don’t have a pressure cooker? Try steaming your eggs on the stovetop! Follow me on Pinterest Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs in the Pressure Cooker Recipe Print Check your pressure cooker manual for the minimum requirement of liquid in the pot, and add at least that amount. If no instructions are given, add 1 inch of water. If your pressure cooker didn't come with its own steamer basket, you can use a standard metal or silicone steamer basket in its place. (If you don't have a steamer basket, you can skip it, but you may get a greater number ofΒ cracked eggs.) Avoid stacking eggs on top of each other since this can also lead to more cracked eggs. If you need to cook more eggs than will fit in a single layer, I suggest cooking multiple batches. Ingredients Large eggs, cold from the fridge -- at least 1 egg or as many as will fit in a single layer in your pressure cooker Special equipment: Stovetop or electric pressure cooker (I use a 6-quart Instant Pot) Metal steamer basket or silicone steamer basket Method 1 Prepare the pressure cooker:Β Place a steamer basket in the bottom of your pressure cooker.Β Add 1/2 to 1 inches of water (1 to 2 cups) to the pressure cooker (check your pressure cooker manual for minimal liquid amounts). The water level should be just below the steamer basket. 2 Add all the eggs:Β Use cold eggs, straight from the fridge. You can cook as many eggs as you like at one time, but be careful of wedging eggs too firmlyΒ against one another or stacking eggs on top of each other since these can cause eggs to crack. 3 Bring the pot up to pressure:Β Close the lid on the pressure cooker and make sure the steam valveΒ is set to the "sealed" position. Set the pressure to high and set the timer for 4 minutes for electric pressure cookers (3 minutes for stovetop). The pressure cooker will take 5 to 10 minutes to come to full pressure and then being cooking. Cooking time begins once the cooker has come to pressure. 4 Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes.Β After cooking is done, let the pressure cooker sit for 5 minutes with the lid on and the steam vent "sealed"Β to allow steam to begin releasingΒ naturally. (If you're using a stovetop pressure cooker, remove it from heat.) 5 Quick-release the remaining pressure:Β After 5 minutes of natural release, flip the steam valveΒ to "venting" and quick-release any remaining pressure. 6 Cool the eggs.Β Transfer the eggs to a bowl of coldΒ water to cool (add ice for more rapid cooling, but ice isn't necessarily for making easy-peel eggs). Change out the water as it warms until the eggs are cool, then refrigerate the eggs until needed. Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own unique words and link back to Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs in the Pressure Cooker on Simply Recipes. Thank you! Print If you make this recipe, snap a pic and hashtag it #simplyrecipes β€” We love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, & Twitter! Emma Christensen Emma Christensen is the managing editor for Simply Recipes, as well as a food writer and homebrewing expert. She was formerly the recipe editor for The Kitchn and is the author of three books on home-brewing, True Brews, Brew Better Beer, and Modern Cider. Emma is a graduate of The Cambridge School for Culinary Arts and Bryn Mawr College. She lives in San Jose, California. More from Emma

Source: simplyrecipes.com

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