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I've been wanting to share this recipe with you all for days but every time I sat down to write the post, I couldn't figure out how to describe the deliciousness of this ice cream. I still don't have the words. Suffice it to say, mint chocolate chip has been my favorite ice cream flavor for as long as I can remember, but this lemon curd ice cream now shares the top spot. I believe Nancy first shared the link for this recipe (thanks Nancy!!) and she and Mary Ann have both made adaptations of the recipe starring lime instead of lemon. The ice cream is custard based so it starts with egg yolks, sugar and milk. The lemon curd and lemon zest are added to the custard and then it chills overnight in the fridge. The next day heavy cream is whipped and folded into the custard before it is churned. The resulting ice cream is creamy, light and so refreshing. The lemon flavor isn't very strong but you will know you're eating something made with lemons. I think the best thing I can recommend is to give the recipe a shot and see what you think. I hope you'll enjoy it as much as I did! :) Lemon Curd Ice Cream from Murphy's Ice Cream Book of Sweet Things by Sean and Kieran Murphy (as seen here ) 130 g sugar 5 egg yolks 240 ml heavy cream 200 ml milk 50 g lemon curd (I used this recipe from Alton Brown) zest of one lemon 15 ml (1 tablespoon) lemon juice Bring the milk to a low simmer in a saucepan. Meanwhile, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until thick and pale yellow. Temper the eggs by pouring in the milk in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and place over low heat. Stir continuously until the custard thickens slightly and just coats the back of a spoon (about 170 F). Immediately remove the pan from the heat. Add the lemon curd and lemon zest to the warm custard, stirring to incorporate fully. Cover the custard with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. Remove the custard from the refrigerator and strain it to remove the lemon zest (unless you like it in there). Whip the heavy cream until it has doubled in volume and you have soft peaks. Fold the cream into the custard and then add the lemon juice. Churn in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer's instructions. The ice cream will still be fairly soft after churning so you'll want to transfer it to a freezer-proof container and stick it in your freezer until solid.

Source: traceysculinaryadventures.blogspot.com

From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... In some areas of the country, chicken fried steak is the queen of comfort food. Not surprisingly, the dish gets its name because it is prepared in the same manner as Southern fried chicken. While the origins of the dish are muddy, and claims of ownership are disputed, it's logical to conclude the dish was brought to the United States by Austrian immigrants, who then popularized it in the Southern and Western United States. The dish is quite similar to wiener schnitzel, a breaded and fried veal cutlet that comes from Vienna, Austria. There are, however, differences between the two. Chicken fried steak is made from tenderized beef rather than veal and its coated with seasoned flour rather than bread crumbs. The steak is pan-fried and its drippings form the base for a light gravy that is made with a well-seasoned chicken stock or milk. If you are interested, more background about this dish and its preparation can be found here . This is one of those delicious entrées that makes no pretense of being healthy or good for you. It rarely appears on my table, but when it does we thoroughly enjoy it. As an aside, I must tell you I have a friend from Kobe who insists that chicken fried steak is a copy of a Japanese creation called tonkatsu. Tonkatsu is a breaded and deep-fried pork cutlet and more information about it can be found here . It seems that breaded cutlets have joined the ranks of other foods, such as noodles and pancakes, that have spontaneously appeared on tables all over the world. While I love the thought of spontaneous generation, I suspect that these foods were carried by brave seamen and adventurers whom we should thank for the wonderful diversity on our tables. Here's my favorite recipe for Chicken Fried Steak. Chicken Fried Steak ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite inspired by Alton Brown Ingredients: 2 pounds beef bottom round, trimmed of excess fat 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup all-purpose flour 3 whole eggs, beaten 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 cups chicken broth 1/2 cup whole milk 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 250 degrees F. 2) Cut meat with grain into 1/2-inch thick slices. Season each piece on both sides with salt and pepper. Place flour into a pie pan. Place eggs into a separate pie pan. Dredge meat on both sides in flour. Tenderize meat, using a jaccard type tenderizer, until each slice is 1/4-inch thick. Once tenderized, dredge meat again in flour, followed by egg and finally in flour again. Repeat with all pieces of meat. Place meat onto a plate and allow it to sit for 10 to 15 minutes before cooking. 3) Use enough vegetable oil to cover bottom of a 12-inch skillet and set over medium-high heat. When oil begins to shimmer, add meat in batches, being careful not to overcrowd pan. Cook each piece on both sides until golden brown, approximately 4 minutes per side. Remove steaks to a wire rack set in a baking pan and place in oven. Repeat until all meat is browned. 4) Add remaining vegetable oil, or at least 1 tablespoon, to skillet. Whisk in 3 tablespoons of flour left over from dredging. Add chicken broth and whisk until gravy comes to a boil and begins to thicken. Add milk and thyme and whisk until gravy coats a spoon, approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Season to taste, with more salt and pepper, if needed. Serve the gravy over steaks. Yield: 4 to 6 servings. You might also enjoy these recipes: Chicken Fried Steak - The Pioneer Woman Cooks Chicken Fried Steak - Amanda's Cookin' Chicken Fried Flank Steak with Country Gravy - Chewing the Fat Chicken Fried Steak - Carrie's Sweet Life Country Fried Steak - Never Enough Thyme Memories of Texas: Chicken Fried Steak at Massey's - Detroit Eats Chicken Fried Steak - Seriously Good Chicken Fried Steak - Cooking By the Seat of My Pants Country Fried Steak with Brown Gravy - Eclectic Recipes Chicken Fried Steak - Comfort Foodie Fat Tommy's Chicken Fried Steak - The Daily Meal Chicken Fried Chicken - Carrie's Kitchen

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

5 lbs red potatoes 1 lb smoked bacon 1 large white onion 8 eggs 1 cup sugar 2 cups white vinegar 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1 Peel potatoes and cut into half-dollar size slices 1/4" thick or so. If the potato is large, cut it in two lengthwise then slice. Place the slices into a large bowl filled with cold water, keeping the potatoes submerged to prevent browning. 2 Cook bacon, saving all of the drippings. Crumble or chop bacon and place into a bowl, covering bacon and drippings and set aside. Yes, I said save the drippings. All will be revealed to those who are patient and/or hungry. Tip: Use the Alton Brown method of oven-baking the bacon. It's less messy, the bacon cooks more evenly and it conserves more of the drippings for later. Don't know what the Alton Brown method is? Google it. 3 While bacon is cooking, boil eggs until very hard, 15-20 minutes after the water reaches a boil. Shell and chop coarsely. Cover and set aside. 4 While eggs are boiling, chop onion into medium pieces. Place in a colander and rinse under hot water for a minute or so to remove the bitter compounds. 5 Put a large stock pot (12 quart at least) half-filled with water on to boil. (Tip: fill pot with hot tap water - it will cut the boil time considerably) When it reaches a full rolling boil, drain the potato slices and *slowly* dump them into the pot. Cook until just done - soft-ish but still firm enough they won't fall apart when stirred. Al dente, if you will, were such a term applicable to potatoes. Drain. 6 Keep in mind the potatoes will continue too cook in the retained heat for several minutes after taken off the boil. Try to coordinate the other steps to all be ready as sson as the potatoes are done. 7 While potatoes are boiling, quickly combine the bacon crumbles, onion and eggs in a large bowl. In a 4 quart saucepan, heat the reserved bacon drippings (there should be about one cup) on low and when warm add the flour until smooth and all the lumps are gone. Add the sugar and whisk in the vinegar. Heat over medium slowly, gradually increasing the temperature to medium high, until the sauce has thickened to thin mayonnaise consistency. Remove from heat and cover. 8 After the potatoes are drained, put them back into the stock pot (you'll need the room). Add the bacon-egg-onion mix and stir gently until reasonably well combined. Pour the sauce over and stir gently until well-combined, taking care not to damage the potato slices too much. The egg yolk will emulsify into the sauce and create a mayonnaise right in the pot. 9 Making sure your cardiologist is standing by, serve warm aside with any German food - Bratwurst, knockwurst, schnitzel, sauerbraten, with good strong beer. My wife says this potato salad is a meal in its own right. I believe her.

Source: food.com

4 ounces vegetable oil 4 ounces all-purpose flour 1 1/2 lbs raw shrimp , whole, head-on medium-sized (31-50 count) 2 quarts water 1 cup diced onion 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 cup diced green pepper 2 tablespoons minced garlic 1/2 cup peeled seeded and chopped tomato 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 teaspoon fresh thyme , chopped 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 bay leaves 1/2 lb andouille sausage , cut into 1/4-inch pieces and browned 1 tablespoon file powder 1 Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. 2 Place the vegetable oil and flour into a 5 to 6-quart cast iron Dutch oven and whisk together to combine. Place on the middle shelf of the oven, uncovered, and bake for 1 1/2 hours, whisking 2 to 3 times throughout the cooking process. 3 While the roux is baking, de-head, peel and devein the shrimp. Place the shrimp in a bowl and set in the refrigerator. Place the heads and shells in a 4-quart saucepan along with the 2 quarts of water, set over high heat and bring to a boil. Decrease the heat to low and simmer for 1 hour or until the liquid has reduced to 1-quart. Remove from the heat and strain the liquid into a container, discarding the solids. 4 Once the roux is done, carefully remove it from the oven and set over medium-high heat. Gently add the onions, celery, green peppers and garlic and cook, moving constantly for 7 to 8 minutes or until the onions begin to turn translucent. Add the tomatoes, salt, black pepper, thyme, cayenne pepper, and bay leaves and stir to combine. Gradually add the shrimp broth while whisking continually. Decrease the heat to low, cover and cook for 35 minutes. Turn off the heat, add the shrimp and sausage and stir to combine. Add the file powder while stirring constantly. Cover and allow to sit for 10 minutes prior to serving. Serve over rice.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons butter 1/2 onion , minced 1/2 red bell pepper , minced 2 pinches kosher salt 2 cups long grain white rice 2 3/4 cups chicken broth 2 slices orange zest , 1-inch wide by 3-inch long 1 pinch saffron , steeped in 1/4 c hot water 1 bay leaf 1 1/2 cups frozen peas, thawed 1/4 cup golden raisin 1/4 cup chopped pistachios 1 Preheat oven to 350°F. 2 In a heavy, wide pan with a tight-fitting lid, melt butter over medium-low heat. Add onion, red pepper and salt. Sweat until aromatic, stirring constantly. 3 Add rice and stir to coat. Continue stirring until rice smells nutty. 4 Add chicken broth, orange zest, saffron and bay leaf. Bring to a boil. Stir once, then cover pan with damp dish towel or tea towel. Place lid on pan and fold corners of towel up over lid. 5 Place pan in hot oven. Bake 15 min, then rest at room temperature 15-20 min without moving lid. 6 Meanwhile, simmer peas in salted water, or microwave them, until heated through. 7 Remove lid from pan, and turn rice out onto a platter. Stir in peas, and fluff with a large fork. Sprinkle with raisins and pistachios.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons fresh parsley , chopped 2 tablespoons fresh thyme , chopped 2 tablespoons fresh sage , chopped 5 cups all-purpose flour 3 cups kosher salt 3 tablespoons black pepper 5 egg whites, beaten thoroughly with 1 1/2 cups water 6 lbs beef tenderloin 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 Reserve half of the herbs for later. Mix the other half of herbs and all the other dry goods together in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and add the egg whites/water mixture. 2 Use a potato masher (unless you have a very strong KitchenAid) and begin to mash and mix the dough. It will be very tough and crumbly. Scrape down the sides and knead to a solid mass (it will still be crumbly). 3 Place dough (break up if needed) into a sturdy ziplock freezer bag. Seal up and leave on counter for 4-24 hours (this allows the egg whites to soak up the dough). 4 About 1 hr before dough is ready: In order to achieve uniform cooking, fold over slender tail end of tenderloin and tie with kitchen twine. Set a large electric griddle at its highest setting; brush the tenderloin with the olive oil and sear on all sides until well browned, approximately 10 minutes. Rest the meat for at least 5 minutes or until it is cool to the touch so as not to melt the dough. 5 Preheat oven to 400°F Transfer dough to a floured surface and roll out to 3/16-inch thickness, approximately a 24 by 18-inch rectangle. Trim away extra dough, if necessary. Sprinkle the remaining herbs on the center section of the dough and gently press down. 6 Place meat in the middle of the dough. Gently take one side and fold over meat. Fold back a flap. Bring up the other end and crimp together with the flap. Fold short ends over and crimp to seal. You do not want it tight around the meat, but you do want it sealed well. 7 Move the roast onto a baking sheet. Insert a meat thermometer into center of roast. Set to 125°F Baking time is approximately 25-30 minutes. 8 Remove from the oven and allow to rest for 30 minutes or up to 1 hour. The tenderloin will continue to cook 10 to 15 degrees more. Cut salt crust at 1 end and extract meat by pulling out of dough tube using tongs. Slice and serve immediately. (Alton says to toss the casing in the yard as it's good for wildlife).

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds 1 tablespoon celery seed 1 bay leaf 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns 2 tablespoons hot sauce 1 cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar 1/4 cup kosher salt 6 garlic cloves , peeled and crushed 2 cups water 1/2 lb ice 1 1/2 lbs boneless pork butt 1 Combine mustard seeds, celery seeds, bay leaf, peppercorns, hot sauce, vinegar, sugar, salt, garlic and water in a saucepan. Place over medium-high heat until boiling, reduce to a simmer, and maintain for 3 minutes. Turn off heat and add ice. 2 Cut pork butt into 2" cubes. Place in a large zip top bag. When the brine is cool, pour it in as well. Press out as much air as possible and seal the bag. Refrigerate for a minimum of 3 days, turning bag a couple of times a day. 3 Keeps 2 weeks in the refrigerator; after that, drain and freeze. Note that this is NOT edible as is; it still has to be cooked!

Source: food.com

1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 red onions , thinly sliced 1 sweet onion , thinly sliced 1/2 tablespoon sugar kosher salt fresh ground black pepper 1/4 cup cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine 1 cup beef stock 1 bay leaf 4 sprigs thyme , leaves only 15 -20 wonton wrappers 1 cup gruyere , grated 1/3 cup parmesan cheese , grated 2 tablespoons butter chives or fresh thyme sprig , for garnish 1 Heat the butter and oil in a sauté pan on medium-low heat. Add the onions, sugar, salt, and pepper, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. You may have to turn your heat down to low if you find them caramelizing too quickly. You want them very soft, but not burnt. You can also use the Alton Brown method: put them in an electric skillet set to 300°F, cover and leave undisturbed for 10 minutes, then start stirring every few minutes. 2 After 30 minutes, add the cognac. Do not pour the cognac directly into the pan from the bottle if there is a live flame; the flame could travel up the pour-stream and into the bottle, causing it to explode. Measure the cognac in a liquid measuring cup, then move the pan off the heat, pour in the cognac, and return the pan to the stove. Let the cognac reduce for 1 minute. Add the wine, beef stock, bay leaf and thyme. Season again with salt and pepper. Simmer on low for another 30 minutes. 3 Set the onions into a strainer over a bowl to cool to room temperature. Reserve both the onions, and the broth that drains from them. 4 Preheat the broiler. Spray two individual gratin dishes with non-stick spray, and stand them on a foil-lined baking sheet (to make for easy clean-up). 5 Take a wonton wrapper in one hand. Dip a finger or small brush in the reserved broth and moisten the entire surface of one side of the wrapper. Place 1 tsp of the onions in the center of the wrapper. Bring all four corners together, pinching and twisting to form a small pouch (called a beggar's purse). Place dumpling, seam side down, into gratin dish. Continue until both dishes are full. 6 Top each dish with half the Gruyère and half the Parmesan. Dot each dish with 1 tbsp of butter. Pop the dishes under the broiler until the cheese is melted, bubbly and beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Poke a toothpick into each dumpling and garnish with chives or thyme sprigs.

Source: food.com

2 cups whole wheat flour (I used whole wheat pastry flour.) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons sugar 1 Mix together all the dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together all wet ingredients. (I just melted the butter slightly before adding it in with the eggs and buttermilk.). 2 Add the wet stuff to the dry stuff and mix just until batter comes together. Do NOT mix smooth. Set aside batter to rest for 5 minutes. 3 * Heat an electric griddle to 350 degrees or place a nonstick frying pan over medium-low heat. 4 *Test the griddle by flicking water on it. If the water dances across the surface, you’re good to go. 5 * Rub down the griddle with a little butter or spray with nonstick spray. 6 Ladle 1 scoop of batter onto the griddle. (Batter will be thick! Just spread it out with the bottom of your ladle or the back of a spoon.) Cook until bubbles form in the batter and bottom is golden, approximately three minutes. Flip and cook until the second side is golden, another a minute or so. Adjust the heat as necessary as you go along. Serve while hot!

Source: food.com

1 tablespoon smoked paprika (optional, our suggestion) 2 teaspoons chili powder 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 2 turkey legs, raw (approximately 2 1/4 pounds) 1/4 cup vegetable oil 1 small onion , finely chopped 3 garlic cloves , minced 1 serrano chili , seeded and finely minced 3 ounces tomato paste (optional, our suggestion) 1 MEAT FILLING: Place chili powder, cumin, cayenne pepper, oregano, salt, black pepper and turkey legs into a 6-quart pot and add enough water to completely cover the meat, approximately 2 1/2 quarts. Cover, place over high heat and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low and simmer until the meat is very tender and falling apart, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. 2 Remove the meat from the water to a cutting board, and set aside to cool. Leave the cooking liquid in the pot (add tomato paste to liquid now if using). Once the turkey legs are cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the bone and shred, discarding any skin or cartilage. Place a 4-quart saucepan over medium heat and add the vegetable oil. Once shimmering, add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until they are semi-translucent, approximately 2 minutes. 3 Add the garlic and chili and continue to cook for another minute. Add the meat and 1/2 cup of the reserved cooking liquid and cook until heated through and the liquid has evaporated, 2 to 3 minutes. Set aside until ready to assemble. 4 FOR THE WRAPPERS: While the meat is cooking, place the husks in a large bowl or container and submerge completely in hot water. Soak the husks until they are soft and pliable, at least 45 minutes and up to 2 hours. If you have an electric kettle, place the husks in the kettle, fill with water and turn on. Once the kettle turns off, allow the husks to sit for 1 hour in the hot water. 5 FOR THE DOUGH: Place the masa, salt, and baking powder into a large mixing bowl and combine. Add the lard and using your hands, knead together until the lard is well incorporated into the dry mixture. Gradually add enough of the reserved cooking liquid, 2 to 4 cups to create a dough that is like thick mashed potatoes. The dough should be moist but not wet. Cover the bowl with a damp towel and set aside until ready to use. 6 ASSEMBLY: Remove a corn husk from the water and pat to remove excess water. Working in batches of 6, lay the husks on a towel and spread about 2 tablespoons of the dough in an even layer across the wide end of the husk to within 1/2-inch of the edges. Spoon about 2 teaspoons of the meat mixture in a line down the center of the dough. Roll the husk so the dough surrounds the meat and fold the bottom under to finish creating the tamale. Repeat until all the husks, dough and filling are used. Tie the tamales, around the center, individually or in groups of 3, with kitchen twine. 7 STEAMING THE TAMALES: Place a steamer basket in the bottom of an 11-quart pot and add enough water to come to the bottom of the basket. Stand the tamales close together on their folded ends and lean them in towards the center, away from the sides of the pot. Bring the water to a boil over medium heat, then cover and reduce the heat to maintain a simmer. Check the water level every 15 to 20 minutes, and add boiling water by pouring down the side of the pot, if necessary. Steam until the dough is firm and pulls away from the husk easily, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. 8 Serve warm. Store leftover tamales, tightly wrapped in plastic wrap, in the freezer, for up to a month. To reheat, remove the plastic wrap and steam until heated through.

Source: food.com

6 ounces thick-cut bacon , cut into 1-inch strips 2 medium onions , finely chopped 1/2 tablespoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 whole star anise 3 whole cloves 3 tablespoons olive oil , divided 1/2 lb boneless beef chuck roast , ground coarse 1/2 lb boneless pork butt, ground coarse 1 1/4 cups white wine , divided 3 celery ribs , finely chopped 3 garlic cloves , minced 3/4 cup evaporated milk 3 cups beef broth 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms , finely chopped 2 garlic cloves , sliced 2 (28 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 1 tablespoon dried oregano 2 teaspoons dried marjoram 2 teaspoons dried basil 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 tablespoon ketchup 1 tablespoon sherry wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons kosher salt 1/2 lb spaghetti 1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese 1 Set an 8 qt cast iron Dutch oven over low heat and add the bacon. Cook until the fat renders and the bacon is crispy. Transfer bacon to a paper-towel lined plate. 2 Add onion, salt and pepper to fat in pot. Place star anise and cloves in a small cotton spice bag (or wrap in cheesecloth); lay the flat of a chef's knife across the spices and smash your fist on the blade to crack them (or use a mallet). Add the spice bag to the pot as well. Cook over low heat until onions break down and caramelize, about 45 minutes, stirring every few minutes. 3 Place a 4 qt saute pan over high heat and add 1 tbsp olive oil. When oil begins to emit wisps of smoke, add beef and pork. Stir constantly for 4-5 minutes until the meat is brown and broken into small chunks. Transfer to a colander set over a bowl. Return the saute pan to the high heat. 4 Deglaze saute pan with 1/2 cup white wine, scraping any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. When wine has reduced by half, turn off the heat. 5 When onions are mahogany brown, add celery and minced garlic. Cook over low heat for 30 minutes, until intensely fragrant. Remove and discard the spice bag. 6 Add the meat and reduced wine to Dutch oven. Add another 1/2 cup white wine, evaporated milk and beef broth. Add porcinis. Cook very slowly over low heat, covered, for 3 hours, stirring every 30 minutes. 7 Add 1 tbsp olive oil to saute pan and heat until shimmering over medium heat. Add sliced garlic and saute until fragrant, 30-45 seconds. Add tomatoes (with any juice in the cans), along with oregano, marjoram and basil. Cook over medium heat until most of the liquid evaporates, 25-30 minutes. 8 Reduce heat to low and add tomato paste, ketchup, sherry vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and 1/4 cup white wine. Simmer 30 minutes. 9 Add 1 tbsp olive oil to tomatoes and turn heat up to medium high. Stir vigorously and constantly for 2-3 minutes. Add tomatoes to meat mixture. Continue to simmer over low heat, uncovered, while preparing pasta. 10 Bring 4 quarts of water to a boil in a deep, narrow pot. Add salt. Add spaghetti when water is at a rolling boil. Stir for a few minutes to minimize sticking, then reduce heat to keep a steady but not violent boil. Start checking after 5 minutes; the pasta should be not-quite al dente; there should still be a little crunch in the center. Drain the pasta and add to the meat sauce, along with parmesan cheese. Cook another 4-5 minutes until pasta is al dente.

Source: food.com

6 hard-boiled eggs , cooled and peeled 1/2-1 teaspoon whole pink peppercorns, divided 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole white peppercorns 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorn 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole green peppercorn 1/2 teaspoon caper liquid 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/8-1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 pinch sugar 1 Slice the eggs in half from top to bottom. Scoop the yolks into a medium mixing bowl and lay the whites aside. 2 Place all of the peppercorns, except 1/4-1/2 teaspoon of the pink peppercorns, into a spice grinder and process until ground well. Add the ground peppers, caper liquid, mayonnaise, mustard, salt and sugar to the egg yolks and using a fork, stir to thoroughly combine. 3 Place the mixture into a zip-top plastic bag and cut a small hole at one of the corners. Pipe the mixture into each of the white halves. 4 Coarsely grind the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of pink peppercorns and use to garnish the top of each egg. 5 Chill for at least 1 hour in the refrigerator before serving.

Source: food.com

3 Hass avocadoes , halved, seeded and peeled 1 lime , juiced 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon cayenne 1/2 medium onion , diced 2 roma tomatoes , seeded and diced 1 tablespoon cilantro , chopped 1 garlic clove , minced 1 In a large bowl place the scooped avocado pulp and lime juice, toss to coat. Drain, and reserve the lime juice, after all of the avocados have been coated. Using a potato masher add the salt, cumin, and cayenne and mash. Then, fold in the onions, tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic. Add 1 tablespoon of the reserved lime juice. Let sit at room temperature for 1 hour and then serve. 2 Note: The only thing I changed, and I have made this several times, is that I do not use a potato masher, I like chunky guacamole. 3 If you have to make this early, take one of the Avocado pits and place it in the dip, this helps the dip stay nice and green, remove before serving.

Source: food.com

For about five minutes — before we remembered that we have an infant, a 6 year-old, two full-time jobs, a not very big apartment, an international business trip this month (sadly, not mine) are now doubting we are actually made of whatever is required to pull this off — we thought we might have a Friendsgiving dinner party this year. I love Thanksgiving and I want more of it in my life, ditto to friends and also dinner parties. Everything about this was going to awesome. I didn’t have to plan the menu to my perfect Thanksgiving dinner because I wrote it in my head probably five years ago and from what I hear, Alton Brown’s turkey recipe is the only one you’ll ever need. (Or should I dry brine? Or maybe this lacquered thing? Or maybe a mash-up of all of them? Or maybe just import a smoked one from Texas and be the most chilled out host in the history of Thanksgiving, ever, amiright?) Right, well, I had everything else planned out: Pretzel Parker House Rolls This Salad I’m Going To Tell You About Next Week Squash Toasts with Ricotta and Cider Vinegar Kale and Caramelized Onion Stuffing Balsamic-Braised Brussels with Pancetta Green Bean Casserole with Crispy Onions Wild Mushroom and Stilton Galettes (the plan was to make 2 or 3 and turn them each into 2 to 3 single-serving as something of a turkey alternative) A Gratin of Some Sort — either Cauliflower or Potato Cranberry Sauce Classic Pumpkin Pie with Pecan Praline Sauce Pecan Pie (also coming next week, yessss) An awesome cocktail And this is where the fun began. I decided that a new tradition required a new special cocktail that would forever be tied to a time and place. In general, I’m a classicist about sangria. Like most of us, I’ve endured all sorts of disturbing ingredients masquerading as sangria — Sprite, frozen lemonade, coconut rum, basil, a ton of sugar (whhhy) which are all ingredients I’ve pulled from just the first few Google results for sangria — and try not to mess with what’s always worked. But, it turned out, I didn’t have to upend tradition too obnoxiously to make the apple cider sangria of my dreams. For the red wine, I used a dry white. For the brandy, I used an apple brandy or Calvados. Instead of a splash of juice, I used apple cider, which I’d reduced so it would be more concentrated and flavorful. I kept the less traditional Triple Sec in place, because I like the hint of orange, but you can skip it if you are less of a sangria blasphemist. And for the fruit, we used a mix of apples, because like everyone else, we overdid it at the apple farms in October. The result was even better than I’d hoped, and apple-y in an adult way: subtle and not terribly sweet. As our kids ran up and down the hallways in an sugar-demonic haze, trick-or-treating through a friend’s building last weekend, we grownups got to sip from glasses of, uh, grown-up candy. (While saving the actual candy-thieving for after they fall asleep, as is our parental privilege, of course.) One year ago: Sticky Toffee Pudding Two years ago: Perfect, Uncluttered Chicken Stock Three years ago: Granola-Crusted Nuts Four years ago: Baked Pumpkin and Sour Cream Puddings Five years ago: Upside-Down Cranberry Cake Six years ago: Moroccan-Spiced Spaghetti Squash Seven years ago: Pepita Brittle Eight years ago: Lemon Ricotta Pancakes with Sauteed Apples Nine years ago: Not Your Mama’s Coleslaw And for the other side of the world: Six Months Ago: Liege Waffles 1.5 Years Ago: Fresh Spinach Pasta 2.5 Years Ago: Essential Raised Waffles 3.5 Years Ago: Bacon Egg and Leek Risotto 4.5 Years Ago: Creme Brulee French Toasts Apple Cider Sangria Psst, here’s the other reason I rather love having a big pitcher or two of a single, seasonally-perfect, agreeable-to-most cocktail at dinner parties: it saves you a lot of work. Sure, you might still grab a six-pack of beer or a bottle or two of wine or bubbly, but for the most part, most people will drink what you’ve mixed and you won’t spend any time fussing about with tonics and gins and juice and bourbon and vodka. A good cocktail is efficient. Makes 1 pitcher (about 1 quart) sangria; definitely double for a crowd 1 cup apple cider (the fresh kind, not the fizzy alcoholic kind) 1 bottle dry white wine 1/4 cup calvados or another apple brandy 1/4 cup Triple sec or another orange liqueur Mixed colors of apples, diced and tossed with lemon juice to prevent browning Seltzer, sparkling water or sparkling apple cider to finish Place the apple cider in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce about 3/4 of the way, until you have approximately 1/4 cup apple cider left; this will take 10 to 15 minutes. Pour into small bowl set over a bowl of ice water and stir; it will cool very quickly this way. Pour reduced, cooled cider into pitcher. Add wine, apple brandy and triple sec. Add fruit and let sit in the fridge until needed. Add some fizz right before serving; a slotted spoon will help guests hold back the fruit while pouring their glasses, and spoon some on top, if desired.

Source: smittenkitchen.com

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