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Tweet #pin-wrapper > a {background-image:none !important;} From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite... In some areas of the country, chicken fried steak is the queen of comfort food. Not surprisingly, the dish gets its name because it is prepared in the same manner as Southern fried chicken. While the origins of the dish are muddy, and claims of ownership are disputed, it's logical to conclude the dish was brought to the United States by Austrian immigrants, who then popularized it in the Southern and Western United States. The dish is quite similar to wiener schnitzel, a breaded and fried veal cutlet that comes from Vienna, Austria. There are, however, differences between the two. Chicken fried steak is made from tenderized beef rather than veal and its coated with seasoned flour rather than bread crumbs. The steak is pan-fried and its drippings form the base for a light gravy that is made with a well-seasoned chicken stock or milk. If you are interested, more background about this dish and its preparation can be found here . This is one of those delicious entrées that makes no pretense of being healthy or good for you. It rarely appears on my table, but when it does we thoroughly enjoy it. As an aside, I must tell you I have a friend from Kobe who insists that chicken fried steak is a copy of a Japanese creation called tonkatsu. Tonkatsu is a breaded and deep-fried pork cutlet and more information about it can be found here . It seems that breaded cutlets have joined the ranks of other foods, such as noodles and pancakes, that have spontaneously appeared on tables all over the world. While I love the thought of spontaneous generation, I suspect that these foods were carried by brave seamen and adventurers whom we should thank for the wonderful diversity on our tables. Here's my favorite recipe for Chicken Fried Steak. Chicken Fried Steak ...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite inspired by Alton Brown Ingredients: 2 pounds beef bottom round, trimmed of excess fat 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup all-purpose flour 3 whole eggs, beaten 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 cups chicken broth 1/2 cup whole milk 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 250 degrees F. 2) Cut meat with grain into 1/2-inch thick slices. Season each piece on both sides with salt and pepper. Place flour into a pie pan. Place eggs into a separate pie pan. Dredge meat on both sides in flour. Tenderize meat, using a jaccard type tenderizer, until each slice is 1/4-inch thick. Once tenderized, dredge meat again in flour, followed by egg and finally in flour again. Repeat with all pieces of meat. Place meat onto a plate and allow it to sit for 10 to 15 minutes before cooking. 3) Use enough vegetable oil to cover bottom of a 12-inch skillet and set over medium-high heat. When oil begins to shimmer, add meat in batches, being careful not to overcrowd pan. Cook each piece on both sides until golden brown, approximately 4 minutes per side. Remove steaks to a wire rack set in a baking pan and place in oven. Repeat until all meat is browned. 4) Add remaining vegetable oil, or at least 1 tablespoon, to skillet. Whisk in 3 tablespoons of flour left over from dredging. Add chicken broth and whisk until gravy comes to a boil and begins to thicken. Add milk and thyme and whisk until gravy coats a spoon, approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Season to taste, with more salt and pepper, if needed. Serve the gravy over steaks. Yield: 4 to 6 servings. You might also enjoy these recipes: Chicken Fried Steak - The Pioneer Woman Cooks Chicken Fried Steak - Amanda's Cookin' Chicken Fried Flank Steak with Country Gravy - Chewing the Fat Chicken Fried Steak - Carrie's Sweet Life Country Fried Steak - Never Enough Thyme Memories of Texas: Chicken Fried Steak at Massey's - Detroit Eats Chicken Fried Steak - Seriously Good Chicken Fried Steak - Cooking By the Seat of My Pants Country Fried Steak with Brown Gravy - Eclectic Recipes Chicken Fried Steak - Comfort Foodie Fat Tommy's Chicken Fried Steak - The Daily Meal Chicken Fried Chicken - Carrie's Kitchen

Source: oneperfectbite.blogspot.com

I had heard about Alton Brown's Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies for the longest time. But, seeing as how I don't usually have bread flour in the house, I never had a chance to make them, until now. Seeing as how so many people have raved about this cookie, not to mention the fact that it is Alton Brown's recipe (that man can do no wrong), I had only the highest expectations for them. Unfortunately, the cookie failed to meet my expectations. Yes, they were chewy. But, something about the taste seemed to be lacking. Maybe they need more sugar or vanilla. At any rate, while I'm glad to have finally tried them, I think I'll stick with my tried and true chocolate chip cookie recipe from here on out. Alton Brown's The Chewy 2 sticks unsalted butter 2 1/4 c. bread flour 1 tsp. kosher salt 1 tsp. baking soda 1/4 c. sugar 1 1/4 c. brown sugar 1 egg 1 egg yolk 2 Tbsp. milk 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla 2 c. semisweet chocolate chips Melt the butter. Add the sugar and brown sugar and cream together. Add the egg, yolk, milk, and vanilla. Add the dry ingredients and then stir in the chocolate chips. Chill the dough, then scoop onto cookie sheets. Bake at 375F for 14 min. or until golden brown. I will say this though, they photograph beautifully.

Source: sweet-as-sugar-cookies.blogspot.com

1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 red onions , thinly sliced 1 sweet onion , thinly sliced 1/2 tablespoon sugar kosher salt fresh ground black pepper 1/4 cup cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine 1 cup beef stock 1 bay leaf 4 sprigs thyme , leaves only 15 -20 wonton wrappers 1 cup gruyere , grated 1/3 cup parmesan cheese , grated 2 tablespoons butter chives or fresh thyme sprig , for garnish 1 Heat the butter and oil in a sauté pan on medium-low heat. Add the onions, sugar, salt, and pepper, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. You may have to turn your heat down to low if you find them caramelizing too quickly. You want them very soft, but not burnt. You can also use the Alton Brown method: put them in an electric skillet set to 300°F, cover and leave undisturbed for 10 minutes, then start stirring every few minutes. 2 After 30 minutes, add the cognac. Do not pour the cognac directly into the pan from the bottle if there is a live flame; the flame could travel up the pour-stream and into the bottle, causing it to explode. Measure the cognac in a liquid measuring cup, then move the pan off the heat, pour in the cognac, and return the pan to the stove. Let the cognac reduce for 1 minute. Add the wine, beef stock, bay leaf and thyme. Season again with salt and pepper. Simmer on low for another 30 minutes. 3 Set the onions into a strainer over a bowl to cool to room temperature. Reserve both the onions, and the broth that drains from them. 4 Preheat the broiler. Spray two individual gratin dishes with non-stick spray, and stand them on a foil-lined baking sheet (to make for easy clean-up). 5 Take a wonton wrapper in one hand. Dip a finger or small brush in the reserved broth and moisten the entire surface of one side of the wrapper. Place 1 tsp of the onions in the center of the wrapper. Bring all four corners together, pinching and twisting to form a small pouch (called a beggar's purse). Place dumpling, seam side down, into gratin dish. Continue until both dishes are full. 6 Top each dish with half the Gruyère and half the Parmesan. Dot each dish with 1 tbsp of butter. Pop the dishes under the broiler until the cheese is melted, bubbly and beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Poke a toothpick into each dumpling and garnish with chives or thyme sprigs.

Source: food.com

2 quarts water 1 cup kosher salt 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons saltpeter 1 cinnamon stick , broken into several pieces 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 8 whole cloves 8 allspice berries 12 whole juniper berries 2 bay leaves , crumbled 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 2 lbs ice 1 (4 -5 lb) beef brisket , trimmed 1 small onion , quartered 1 large carrot , coarsely chopped 1 stalk celery , coarsely chopped 1 Place the water into a large 6 to 8 quart stockpot along with salt, sugar, saltpeter, cinnamon stick, mustard seeds, peppercorns, cloves, allspice, juniper berries, bay leaves and ginger. 2 Cook over high heat until the salt and sugar have dissolved. 3 Remove from the heat and add the ice. 4 Stir until the ice has melted. 5 If necessary, place the brine into the refrigerator until it reaches a temperature of 45 degrees (I put mine in the refrigerator over night). 6 Once it has cooled, place the brisket in a 2-gallon zip top bag and add the brine. 7 Seal and lay flat inside a container, cover and place in the refrigerator for 10 days. 8 Check daily to make sure the beef is completely submerged and stir the brine. 9 After 10 days, remove from the brine and rinse well under cool water. 10 Place the brisket into a pot just large enough to hold the meat, add the onion, carrot and celery and cover with water by 1-inch. 11 Set over high heat and bring to a boil. 12 Reduce the heat to low, cover and gently simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender. 13 Remove from the pot and thinly slice across the grain. 14 My Crock pot method:. 15 After 10 days, remove from the brine and rinse well under cool water. 16 Place the brisket into bottom of crock pot. 17 Add 5 potatoes cut in half and 1 pound baby carrots. 18 Turn on high and cook for 2 hours. 19 Add whole head of cabbage that you have quartered. 20 Make sure you keep cabbage from touching the crock pot so it will not burn. 21 Cook another 2 hours on high. 22 Slice and serve with the vegetables.

Source: food.com

1 lb cooked and chilled medium shrimp , minced 10 ounces chunky salsa 2 cups cooked rice ( Alton Brown's Baked Brown Rice would be great!) 1 large cucumber , seeded and diced 1 medium size green pepper , diced 3/4 cup thinly sliced green onion 2 tablespoons lime juice 3 garlic cloves , minced 8 cooked and chilled large shrimp red leaf lettuce 8 tablespoons chili sauce 1 Mix all ingredients, EXCEPT large shrimp, chili sauce and lettuce. 2 Chill 2 hours. 3 Line plates with lettuce leaves and divide shrimp and rice mixture among 4 plates. 4 Garnish with 2 of the large shrimp each and drizzle with chili sauce.

Source: food.com

2 -3 garlic cloves 1 (15 1/2 ounce) can garbanzo beans , drained, with liquid reserved 2 -3 tablespoons smooth peanut butter handful fresh parsley 1 lemon , zested and juiced 1 pinch black pepper 1 pinch kosher salt 1/3 cup of extra virgin olive oil 1 Place the garlic in a food processor and finely chop. 2 Add beans and 1/2 of the reserved liquid. Process finely or to desired consistency. 3 Add parsley, lemon juice and zest, black pepper, and salt. 4 Process until it forms a paste. 5 Drizzle with olive oil and process until consistency of a mayonnaise.

Source: food.com

7 -8 lbs city-style brined ham , hock end 1/4 cup brown mustard 2 cups dark brown sugar 1 ounce Bourbon (poured into a spritz bottle) 2 cups crushed gingersnap cookies 1 Heat oven to 250 degrees F. 2 Remove ham from bag, rinse and drain thoroughly. 3 Place ham, cut side down, in a roasting pan. 4 Using a small paring knife or clean utility knife set to the smallest blade setting, score the ham from bottom to top, spiraling clockwise as you cut. 5 (If you are using a paring knife, be careful to only cut through the skin and first few layers of fat). 6 Rotate the ham after each cut so that the scores are no more than 2-inches across. 7 Once you have made it all the way around, move the knife to the other hand and repeat, spiraling counter clockwise. 8 The aim is to create a diamond pattern all over the ham. 9 (Don't worry too much about precision here.) Tent the ham with heave duty foil, insert a thermometer, and cook for 3 to 4 hours or until the internal temperature at the deepest part of the meat registers 130 degrees F. 10 Remove and use tongs to pull away the diamonds of skin and any sheets of fat that come off with them. 11 Heat oven to 350 degrees F. 12 Dab dry with paper towels, then brush on a liberal coat of mustard, using either a basting brush or a clean point brush (clean--as in never-touched paint). 13 Sprinkle on brown sugar, packing loosely as you go until the ham is coated. 14 Spritz this layer lightly with bourbon, then loosely pack on as much of the crushed cookies as you can. NOTE: A small empty spray bottle from the drug store is perfect. 15 Insert the thermometer (don't use the old hole) and return to the oven (uncovered). 16 Cook until interior temperature reaches 140 degrees F, approximately 1 hour. 17 Let the roast rest for 1/2 hour before carving.

Source: food.com

1/2 lb elbow macaroni 3 tablespoons butter 3 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon mustard powder 3 cups milk 1/2 cup yellow onion , finely diced 1 bay leaf 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1 large egg 12 ounces sharp cheddar cheese , shredded 1 teaspoon kosher salt fresh black pepper 1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large pot of boiling, salted water cook the pasta to al dente. 2 While the pasta is cooking, in a separate pot, melt the butter. Whisk in the flour and mustard and keep it moving for about five minutes making sure it's free of lumps. 3 Stir in the milk, onion, bay leaf, and paprika. Simmer for ten minutes and remove the bay leaf. 4 Temper in the egg. Stir in 3/4 of the cheese. Season with salt and pepper. 5 Fold the macaroni into the mix and pour into a 2-quart casserole dish. Top with remaining cheese. 6 For the topping, melt the butter in a sauté pan and toss the bread crumbs to coat. Top the macaroni with the bread crumbs. Bake for 30 minutes. 7 Remove from oven and rest for five minutes before serving.

Source: food.com

1 1/2 cups long grain brown rice 2 1/2 cups water 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 teaspoon salt 1 Preheat oven to 375ºF. 2 Boil the water and add the butter and salt. Stir to dissolve salt and melt butter. 3 Place the rice in an 8" casserole dish. Pour the boiling water mixture over the rice and stir. 4 Cover with foil and bake on the middle rack for 1 hour. 5 Fluff with fork and serve. 6 This rice also refrigerates and reheats fairly well, but it's best freshly made.

Source: food.com

1/2 onion , thinly sliced 2 medium cucumbers , thinly sliced 1 cup water 1 cup cider vinegar 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 pinch kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 teaspoon celery seed 1/2 teaspoon pickling spices 1 combine onion cucumber slices in a clean ait tight jar or container. 2 combine the remaining ingredients in a non reactive sauce pan and bring to a boil simmer for 4 minutes to wake up the flavors of the spices. 3 slowly pour the hot pickling liquid over the onions and cucumber slices completely filling the jar 4 allow the pickles to cool to room temperature beforetopping off with any remaining pickling liquid the refridgerate.

Source: food.com

2 lbs red potatoes 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 3/4 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon mustard powder 1/4 cup parsley , chopped 1 tablespoon fresh tarragon , chopped 1/2 tablespoon garlic , very thinly sliced 3 tablespoons cornichons, fine chopped 1/2 cup red onion , small dice 1/2 cup celery , thinly sliced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 Place potatoes into a large heavy-bottomed pot. 2 Cover with cold water and place over medium heat. 3 Cover the pot and bring to a boil. 4 Immediately reduce heat and remove lid. 5 Gently simmer until potatoes are fork tender. 6 Drain and place into an ice bath to cool. 7 Remove skin by rubbing with a tea towel. 8 Slice potatoes into rounds and place into a zip top bag. 9 Add the vinegar and toss to coat all of the potatoes. 10 Place the bag into the refrigerator overnight. 11 In a large mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, mustard, parsley, tarragon, garlic, cornichons, onions, and celery. 12 Once evenly combined, add the potatoes and season with salt and pepper. 13 Let the salad chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour before serving.

Source: food.com

For about five minutes — before we remembered that we have an infant, a 6 year-old, two full-time jobs, a not very big apartment, an international business trip this month (sadly, not mine) are now doubting we are actually made of whatever is required to pull this off — we thought we might have a Friendsgiving dinner party this year. I love Thanksgiving and I want more of it in my life, ditto to friends and also dinner parties. Everything about this was going to awesome. I didn’t have to plan the menu to my perfect Thanksgiving dinner because I wrote it in my head probably five years ago and from what I hear, Alton Brown’s turkey recipe is the only one you’ll ever need. (Or should I dry brine? Or maybe this lacquered thing? Or maybe a mash-up of all of them? Or maybe just import a smoked one from Texas and be the most chilled out host in the history of Thanksgiving, ever, amiright?) Right, well, I had everything else planned out: Pretzel Parker House Rolls This Salad I’m Going To Tell You About Next Week Squash Toasts with Ricotta and Cider Vinegar Kale and Caramelized Onion Stuffing Balsamic-Braised Brussels with Pancetta Green Bean Casserole with Crispy Onions Wild Mushroom and Stilton Galettes (the plan was to make 2 or 3 and turn them each into 2 to 3 single-serving as something of a turkey alternative) A Gratin of Some Sort — either Cauliflower or Potato Cranberry Sauce Classic Pumpkin Pie with Pecan Praline Sauce Pecan Pie (also coming next week, yessss) An awesome cocktail And this is where the fun began. I decided that a new tradition required a new special cocktail that would forever be tied to a time and place. In general, I’m a classicist about sangria. Like most of us, I’ve endured all sorts of disturbing ingredients masquerading as sangria — Sprite, frozen lemonade, coconut rum, basil, a ton of sugar (whhhy) which are all ingredients I’ve pulled from just the first few Google results for sangria — and try not to mess with what’s always worked. But, it turned out, I didn’t have to upend tradition too obnoxiously to make the apple cider sangria of my dreams. For the red wine, I used a dry white. For the brandy, I used an apple brandy or Calvados. Instead of a splash of juice, I used apple cider, which I’d reduced so it would be more concentrated and flavorful. I kept the less traditional Triple Sec in place, because I like the hint of orange, but you can skip it if you are less of a sangria blasphemist. And for the fruit, we used a mix of apples, because like everyone else, we overdid it at the apple farms in October. The result was even better than I’d hoped, and apple-y in an adult way: subtle and not terribly sweet. As our kids ran up and down the hallways in an sugar-demonic haze, trick-or-treating through a friend’s building last weekend, we grownups got to sip from glasses of, uh, grown-up candy. (While saving the actual candy-thieving for after they fall asleep, as is our parental privilege, of course.) One year ago: Sticky Toffee Pudding Two years ago: Perfect, Uncluttered Chicken Stock Three years ago: Granola-Crusted Nuts Four years ago: Baked Pumpkin and Sour Cream Puddings Five years ago: Upside-Down Cranberry Cake Six years ago: Moroccan-Spiced Spaghetti Squash Seven years ago: Pepita Brittle Eight years ago: Lemon Ricotta Pancakes with Sauteed Apples Nine years ago: Not Your Mama’s Coleslaw And for the other side of the world: Six Months Ago: Liege Waffles 1.5 Years Ago: Fresh Spinach Pasta 2.5 Years Ago: Essential Raised Waffles 3.5 Years Ago: Bacon Egg and Leek Risotto 4.5 Years Ago: Creme Brulee French Toasts Apple Cider Sangria Psst, here’s the other reason I rather love having a big pitcher or two of a single, seasonally-perfect, agreeable-to-most cocktail at dinner parties: it saves you a lot of work. Sure, you might still grab a six-pack of beer or a bottle or two of wine or bubbly, but for the most part, most people will drink what you’ve mixed and you won’t spend any time fussing about with tonics and gins and juice and bourbon and vodka. A good cocktail is efficient. Makes 1 pitcher (about 1 quart) sangria; definitely double for a crowd 1 cup apple cider (the fresh kind, not the fizzy alcoholic kind) 1 bottle dry white wine 1/4 cup calvados or another apple brandy 1/4 cup Triple sec or another orange liqueur Mixed colors of apples, diced and tossed with lemon juice to prevent browning Seltzer, sparkling water or sparkling apple cider to finish Place the apple cider in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce about 3/4 of the way, until you have approximately 1/4 cup apple cider left; this will take 10 to 15 minutes. Pour into small bowl set over a bowl of ice water and stir; it will cool very quickly this way. Pour reduced, cooled cider into pitcher. Add wine, apple brandy and triple sec. Add fruit and let sit in the fridge until needed. Add some fizz right before serving; a slotted spoon will help guests hold back the fruit while pouring their glasses, and spoon some on top, if desired.

Source: smittenkitchen.com

Hard boiled eggs that are easy to peel? Use your pressure cooker! Perfect, easily peeled eggs every time. Print Photography Credit: Emma Christensen Like many of you, I abandoned theΒ dream of finding one surefire methodΒ for making consistently perfectΒ hard boiled eggs some time ago. After trying a fewΒ too many “foolproof” tricksΒ with spotty results, I relegatedΒ easy-peel eggs toΒ the same categoryΒ as unicorns and cheap airfare: nice to fantasizeΒ about, but if they were trulyΒ real, you’d think we’dΒ have heard about it by now. But that’s the thing about myths — just when you’ve thrown your hands in the air and walked away, something new comes along to rekindle your hope. Like Fox Mulder, we want to believe. For me, that something newΒ was myΒ pressure cookerΒ and a friend’s improbable suggestion that I try using it to makeΒ a batch of eggs. Just like that, the dream was alive again. I’ve actually been sitting on this revelation for a few months now just because I didn’t trust the evidence of my own eyes: Two eggs or a dozen, fresh eggs or weeks old, white eggs or brown eggs, it didn’t matter. The shells slipped easily off each time, leaving a smooth and pristine hard boiled egg. There are a few theories for why this is. Some say that, similar toΒ steaming eggs, the pressure cooker forces steam inside the egg’s shell during cooking, causingΒ it to separate from the egg white. Alton Brown’s theory is that it’s more aboutΒ the rapid temperature change inside the sealed pot. Either way, it works. Making hard-cooked eggs in the pressure cooker is the only method I’ve found that has worked for me every single time. I based my eggsΒ on the popular “5-5-5” methodΒ for hard-cooked eggs in the Instant Pot.Β The idea is to put your eggs into a steamer basket and sealΒ themΒ inside your pressure cooker along with a cup or so of water. It takes about five minutes for the cooker to come up to high pressure, five minutes to cook the eggs, and then five minutes of natural pressure release before removing the eggs from the cookerΒ — hence the “5-5-5” method. I found that this basic formula worked just fine, though it typically takes my pressure cooker closer to 10 minutes before fully pressurizing. I also decided that I like the texture of 4-minute eggs better than 5-minute eggs. At four minutes, the whites are firm but soft and the yolk is cooked through but still creamy; at five minutes, I felt like the whites started to become rubbery and the yolk was a little chalky. Give it a try both ways and see which you prefer. Also, for those of you with stovetop pressure cookers, I recommend a quicker 3-minute cook time.Β Stovetop pressure cookers can reach a higher pressure than electric cookers and tend to cook food more quickly. (For reference, aΒ friend of mine tested this recipe with her stovetop pressure cooker and her verdict was that 4-minute eggs were fine, but tasted slightly overcooked.) The only un-perfect thing about this way of hard boiling eggs is that, every so often, one of the eggs will crack its shell during cooking. When this has happened to me, it’s usually been during the 5 minute “natural release”Β period after the eggs are already cooked, so the crack is only superficially cosmetic. Not idealΒ if you’re planning to dye a bunch of Easter eggs, of course, but perfectly fine for deviled eggs. If your eggs seem to beΒ cracking more often, or are cracking earlier during cooking before the whites are set, try cooking them at low pressure instead of high pressure. My own tests at low pressure gave inconsistent results, but every pressure cooker is a little different and you might have better luck with yours. The jury is still out onΒ unicorns and affordable airfare, but easy-to-peel eggs, at least, are real. Don’t have a pressure cooker? Try steaming your eggs on the stovetop! Follow me on Pinterest Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs in the Pressure Cooker Recipe Print Check your pressure cooker manual for the minimum requirement of liquid in the pot, and add at least that amount. If no instructions are given, add 1 inch of water. If your pressure cooker didn't come with its own steamer basket, you can use a standard metal or silicone steamer basket in its place. (If you don't have a steamer basket, you can skip it, but you may get a greater number ofΒ cracked eggs.) Avoid stacking eggs on top of each other since this can also lead to more cracked eggs. If you need to cook more eggs than will fit in a single layer, I suggest cooking multiple batches. Ingredients Large eggs, cold from the fridge -- at least 1 egg or as many as will fit in a single layer in your pressure cooker Special equipment: Stovetop or electric pressure cooker (I use a 6-quart Instant Pot) Metal steamer basket or silicone steamer basket Method 1 Prepare the pressure cooker:Β Place a steamer basket in the bottom of your pressure cooker.Β Add 1/2 to 1 inches of water (1 to 2 cups) to the pressure cooker (check your pressure cooker manual for minimal liquid amounts). The water level should be just below the steamer basket. 2 Add all the eggs:Β Use cold eggs, straight from the fridge. You can cook as many eggs as you like at one time, but be careful of wedging eggs too firmlyΒ against one another or stacking eggs on top of each other since these can cause eggs to crack. 3 Bring the pot up to pressure:Β Close the lid on the pressure cooker and make sure the steam valveΒ is set to the "sealed" position. Set the pressure to high and set the timer for 4 minutes for electric pressure cookers (3 minutes for stovetop). The pressure cooker will take 5 to 10 minutes to come to full pressure and then being cooking. Cooking time begins once the cooker has come to pressure. 4 Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes.Β After cooking is done, let the pressure cooker sit for 5 minutes with the lid on and the steam vent "sealed"Β to allow steam to begin releasingΒ naturally. (If you're using a stovetop pressure cooker, remove it from heat.) 5 Quick-release the remaining pressure:Β After 5 minutes of natural release, flip the steam valveΒ to "venting" and quick-release any remaining pressure. 6 Cool the eggs.Β Transfer the eggs to a bowl of coldΒ water to cool (add ice for more rapid cooling, but ice isn't necessarily for making easy-peel eggs). Change out the water as it warms until the eggs are cool, then refrigerate the eggs until needed. Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own unique words and link back to Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs in the Pressure Cooker on Simply Recipes. Thank you! Print If you make this recipe, snap a pic and hashtag it #simplyrecipes β€” We love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, & Twitter! Emma Christensen Emma Christensen is the managing editor for Simply Recipes, as well as a food writer and homebrewing expert. She was formerly the recipe editor for The Kitchn and is the author of three books on home-brewing, True Brews, Brew Better Beer, and Modern Cider. Emma is a graduate of The Cambridge School for Culinary Arts and Bryn Mawr College. She lives in San Jose, California. More from Emma

Source: simplyrecipes.com

My family loves buttermilk pancakes, but only if they're super fluffy. So, to please them, I've long been on a search for a recipe that will yield just such a pancake. Well, the search is over and I have one thing to declare - Alton Brown is the MAN!!! His recipe differs from all others because it requires you to separate the egg and then make two liquid mixtures. The egg white is mixed with the buttermilk and the yolk is combined with the melted butter. Then, these two mixtures are combined before adding it to the dry ingredients. I have no idea scientifically how this works. All I know is that when you flip that pancake over in the pan, it magically puffs up giving you the ultimate light, fluffy pancakes. My family flipped over these pancakes and I'm sure you will too. Buttermilk Pancakes ( Alton Brown ) 2 c. flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 1 Tbsp. sugar 1 egg 1 c. buttermilk (or 1 Tbsp. vinegar added to enough milk to make 1 cup) 2 Tbsp. melted butter Heat a frying pan on medium heat. Combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and sugar and set aside. Whisk together the egg white and the buttermilk in a small bowl. In another bowl, whisk the egg yolk with the melted butter. Combine the buttermilk mixture with the egg yolk mixture in a large mixing bowl and whisk together until thoroughly combined. Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients. Using a whisk, mix the batter just enough to bring it together, about 10 seconds (resist the urge to work out all the lumps). Check to see that the griddle is hot by placing a few drops of water onto to the griddle. The griddle/pan is ready if the water dances across the surface. Lightly butter the griddle or frying pan. Wipe off thoroughly with a paper towel. (No butter should be visible.) Gently ladle the pancake batter onto the griddle/pan (about 1/4 cup). When bubbles begin to set around the edges of the pancake and the griddle-side of the cake is golden, gently flip the pancakes. It will take about 1 minute on each side. Serve immediately or remove to a towel-lined baking sheet and cover with a towel. Hold in a warm place for 20 to 30 minutes. Yield: 8 pancakes This recipe is linked to: Made it on Monday Recipes I Can't Wait to Try Whisking Wednesdays Full Plate Thursday Friday Potluck Fat Camp Friday Sweet Tooth Friday What's Cookin' in the Kitchen

Source: sweet-as-sugar-cookies.blogspot.com



I wanted to try a new turkey recipe this year so I went online to search for some recipes. I found an Alton Brown recipe that sounded interesting and delicious on the Food Network. Due to a busy week, I made the brine the night before I needed it. I let the turkey soak in the brine for 12 hours before roasting. The aromatics were steeped in the microwave before putting them in the cavity of the bird which I thought was clever. I simply seasoned the turkey with vegetable oil and black pepper. This turkey roasted for a few hours and turned out beautiful. The skin was crisp and golden and the meat was tender, juicy, and flavorful. We all thought this turkey was delicious.

Thaw the turkey completely in the refrigerator for a few days before roasting.

Make the brine by combining the turkey stock, salt, brown sugar, black peppercorns, allspice berries, and candied ginger together in a saucepan over medium high heat. Bring to a boil. Stir well and set aside to cool completely. Refrigerate the brine until you need to use it.

12 hours prior to roasting, add 1 gallon of ice cold water to the brine; stir to mix well. Remove the giblets from the turkey cavity and rinse with cold water. Place the turkey, breast side down, in the brine. Use a plate to keep the turkey submerged if needed. Cover the brine container with a lid and refrigerate for 12 hours.

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Line a roasting pan with a roasting rack.

Remove the turkey from the brine and rinse well, inside and out. Pat very dry with paper towels then place on a roasting rack in a roasting tray. Slather vegetable oil all over the turkey then season with freshly cracked black pepper.

Place the water, apple, onion, and cinnamon stick in a microwave proof bowl and cook on high for five minutes.

Add the steeped aromatics to the turkey cavity along with the sage leaves and the rosemary sprigs. Tie the legs together with twine.

Place the turkey in the HOT oven for 30 minutes. REDUCE the heat to 350 degrees and place a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the breast then set alarm for 161 degrees, roast for about 2½-3 hours. Let the turkey rest for at least 15 minutes prior to carving. Enjoy!

5.0 from 2 reviews Roasted Turkey Save Print Prep time 12 hours 30 mins Cook time 3 hours Total time 15 hours 30 mins Author: Pam - For the Love of Cooking / Original recipe by Alton Brown on Food Network Recipe type: Turkey Ingredients

Brine: 1 cup kosher salt cup light brown sugar 1 gallon vegetable stock 1 tbsp black peppercorns 1 tsp allspice berries 1 tsp candied ginger, chopped 1 gallon ice cold water

Turkey: 13 lb turkey Vegetable oil Freshly cracked pepper, to taste 1 cup of water 1 red apple, sliced into wedges sweet yellow onion, sliced into wedges 1 cinnamon stick 6 sage leaves 1 large sprig of rosemary Instructions Thaw the turkey completely in the refrigerator for a few days before roasting. Make the brine by combining the turkey stock, salt, brown sugar, black peppercorns, allspice berries, and candied ginger together in a saucepan over medium high heat. Bring to a boil. Stir well and set aside to cool completely. Refrigerate the brine until you need to use it. 12 hours prior to roasting, add 1 gallon of ice cold water to the brine; stir to mix well. Remove the giblets from the turkey cavity and rinse with cold water. Place the turkey, breast side down, in the brine. Use a plate to keep the turkey submerged if needed. Cover the brine container with a lid and refrigerate for 12 hours. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Remove the turkey from the brine and rinse well, inside and out. Pat very dry with paper towels then place on a roasting rack in a roasting tray. Slather vegetable oil all over the turkey then season with freshly cracked black pepper. Place the water, apple, onion, and cinnamon stick in a microwave proof bowl and cook on high for five minutes. Add the steeped aromatics to the turkey cavity along with the sage leaves and the rosemary sprigs. Tie the legs together with twine. Place the turkey in the HOT oven for 30 minutes. REDUCE the heat to 350 degrees and place a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the breast then set alarm for 161 degrees, roast for about 2½-3 hours. Let the turkey rest for at least 15 minutes prior to carving. Enjoy! 3.5.3226

Source: fortheloveofcooking.net

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