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1 (14 -16 lb) frozen young whole turkey 1 Combine all brine ingredients, except ice water, in a stockpot, and bring to a boil. Stir to dissolve solids, then remove from heat, cool to room temperature, and refrigerate until thoroughly chilled. 2 Early on the day of cooking, (or late the night before) combine the brine and ice water in a clean 5-gallon bucket or 20-quart stock pot. (If you make the brine the same day you need to use it, just use a 7 lb bag of ice and 2 cups of cold water to chill it down fast.). 3 Place thawed turkey breast side down in brine, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area (like a basement) for 6 hours. Turn turkey over once, half way through brining. If not refrigerated, add a couple pounds more ice halfway through to keep it good and cold. 4 A few minutes before roasting, heat oven to 500 degrees. Combine the apple, onion, cinnamon stick, and cup of water in a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 5 minutes. 5 Remove bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard brine. 6 Place bird on roasting rack inside wide, low pan and pat dry with paper towels. Add steeped aromatics to cavity along with rosemary, sage, oregano, lemon and orange. Tuck wings under breasts and coat whole bird liberally with canola (or other neutral) oil. 7 Roast on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F. for 30 minutes. Remove from oven, pour in 3 cups of broth and scrape up any fond (browned bits) on the bottom of the pan. Cover breast with double layer of aluminum foil, insert probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and return to oven, reducing temperature to 350 degrees F. After 45 minutes, add 1 more cup of broth. Set thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees. A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting. Let turkey rest, loosely covered for 15-30 minutes before carving. 8 For the gravy, strain the turkey pan juices from the roasting pan through a sieve and into a 4-cup glass measuring cup; discard the solids. Spoon off the fat from atop the pan juices. Add enough chicken broth, about 1 to 2 cups, to the pan juices to measure 4 cups total. Melt the butter in a heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the flour and whisk for 1 minute. Gradually whisk in the broth. Simmer until the gravy thickens slightly, whisking often, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve the turkey with the gravy.

Source: food.com

10 sweet onions (like Vidalias) or 10 a combination of sweet and red onions 3 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups white wine 10 ounces canned beef consomme 10 ounces chicken broth 10 ounces apple cider (unfiltered is best) bouquet garni , thyme sprigs, bay leaf and parsley 1 loaf country bread kosher salt ground black pepper 1 dash cognac (optional) 1 cup fontina or 1 cup gruyere cheese , grated 1 Trim the ends off each onion then slice from end to end. Remove peel and finely slice into half moon shapes. Set electric skillet to 300 degrees and add butter. Once butter has melted add a layer of onions and sprinkle with a little salt. Repeat layering onions and salt until all onions are in the skillet. Do not try stirring until onions have sweated down for 15 to 20 minutes. After that, stir occasionally until onions are dark mahogany and reduced to approximately 2 cups. This should take 45 minutes to 1 hour. Do not worry about burning. 2 Add enough wine to cover the onions and turn heat to high, reducing the wine to a syrup consistency. Add consume, chicken broth, apple cider and bouquet garni. Reduce heat and simmer 15 to 20 minutes. 3 Place oven rack in top 1/3 of oven and heat broiler. 4 Cut country bread in rounds large enough to fit mouth of oven safe soup crocks. Place the slices on a baking sheet and place under broiler for 1 minute. 5 Season soup mixture with salt, pepper and cognac. Ladle soup into crocks leaving one inch to the lip. Place bread round, toasted side down, on top of soup and top with grated cheese. Broil until cheese is bubbly and golden, 1 to 2 minutes.

Source: food.com

unsalted butter , for the pan 12 ounces flour (plus extra for pan) 12 ounces grated carrots , medium grate (approximately 6 medium) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 10 ounces sugar (approximately 1 1/3 cups) 2 ounces dark brown sugar (approximately 1/4 cup firmly packed) 3 large eggs 6 ounces plain yogurt 6 ounces vegetable oil 1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 2 Butter and flour a 9-inch round and 3-inch deep cake pan. Line the bottom with parchment paper. Set aside. 3 Put the carrots into a large mixing bowl and set aside. 4 Put the flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices, and salt in the bowl of a food processor and process for 5 seconds. Add this mixture to the carrots and toss until they are well-coated with the flour. 5 In the bowl of the food processor combine the sugar, brown sugar, eggs, and yogurt. 6 With the processor still running drizzle in the vegetable oil. Pour this mixture into the carrot mixture and stir until just combined. Pour into the prepared cake pan and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 45 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees F and bake for another 20 minutes or until the cake reaches 205 to 210 degrees F in the center. 7 Remove the pan from the oven and allow cake to cool 15 minutes in the pan. After 15 minutes, turn the cake out onto a rack and allow cake to cool completely. Frost with cream cheese frosting after cake has cooled completely.

Source: food.com

5 -5 1/2 lbs stewing chicken , giblets removed 3 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt , divided 7 -9 cups water 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 3/4 ounces all-purpose flour 2 large eggs , at room temperature fresh ground black pepper 1 Directions. 2 Special equipment: 7-quart pressure cooker. 3 Put the hen and 3 teaspoons of the salt in a 7-quart pressure cooker. Add water just to cover the hen. Do not fill above the cooker's "maximum fill" line, or 2/3 full. Cover and lock the lid. Bring to pressure over high heat, approximately 20 minutes. 4 Reduce the heat to low, so that you barely hear hissing from the pot. Cook for 45 minutes. 5 Release the pressure using the cooker's release device (read the manual!) or cool the cooker by running cold water over the lid for 5 minutes. Open carefully. Remove the hen from the broth and set aside to cool. The meat should be tender and falling away from the bone. Once the hen is cool enough to handle, pull the meat from the bones in small pieces, cover and set aside. Discard the skin and bones. 6 Set a cheesecloth-lined colander in a shallow, wide, 6-quart pot and strain the broth, discarding the solids. Taste and season the broth with additional salt, if needed. 7 Put 1/2 cup of the broth, the butter, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt in a 2-quart saucier, set over high heat, and bring to a boil. As soon as it boils, add all of the flour at once and stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture starts to come together, approximately 1 minute. Decrease the heat to low and continue stirring until the mixture forms a ball and is no longer sticky, approximately 3 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a medium bowl and mix, on low speed, for 5 minutes with an electric hand mixer. Beat until cool and there is no more steam rising. Continue to mix on low, and add the eggs, 1 at a time, making sure each is completely incorporated before adding another. You may need to stop occasionally and scrape down the sides of the bowl. Before adding the last egg, check the mixture for consistency: It should tear slightly as it falls from the beater, creating a "V" shape. Transfer the dough to a 1-gallon resealable plastic bag. Cut off 1 corner of the bag to make a quarter-sized opening. 8 Bring the broth to a slight simmer over medium heat. Pipe 1-inch of the mixture and cut with kitchen shears directly over the broth. Repeat with the remaining batter. Cook, covered, until the dumplings are cooked through, about 8 to 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, add the meat and wait for 2 to 3 minutes before serving. Serve in bowls with freshly ground black pepper.

Source: food.com

2 quarts water 1 cup kosher salt 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons saltpeter 1 cinnamon stick , broken into several pieces 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 8 whole cloves 8 allspice berries 12 whole juniper berries 2 bay leaves , crumbled 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 2 lbs ice 1 (4 -5 lb) beef brisket , trimmed 1 small onion , quartered 1 large carrot , coarsely chopped 1 stalk celery , coarsely chopped 1 Place the water into a large 6 to 8 quart stockpot along with salt, sugar, saltpeter, cinnamon stick, mustard seeds, peppercorns, cloves, allspice, juniper berries, bay leaves and ginger. 2 Cook over high heat until the salt and sugar have dissolved. 3 Remove from the heat and add the ice. 4 Stir until the ice has melted. 5 If necessary, place the brine into the refrigerator until it reaches a temperature of 45 degrees (I put mine in the refrigerator over night). 6 Once it has cooled, place the brisket in a 2-gallon zip top bag and add the brine. 7 Seal and lay flat inside a container, cover and place in the refrigerator for 10 days. 8 Check daily to make sure the beef is completely submerged and stir the brine. 9 After 10 days, remove from the brine and rinse well under cool water. 10 Place the brisket into a pot just large enough to hold the meat, add the onion, carrot and celery and cover with water by 1-inch. 11 Set over high heat and bring to a boil. 12 Reduce the heat to low, cover and gently simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender. 13 Remove from the pot and thinly slice across the grain. 14 My Crock pot method:. 15 After 10 days, remove from the brine and rinse well under cool water. 16 Place the brisket into bottom of crock pot. 17 Add 5 potatoes cut in half and 1 pound baby carrots. 18 Turn on high and cook for 2 hours. 19 Add whole head of cabbage that you have quartered. 20 Make sure you keep cabbage from touching the crock pot so it will not burn. 21 Cook another 2 hours on high. 22 Slice and serve with the vegetables.

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds 1 tablespoon celery seed 1 bay leaf 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns 2 tablespoons hot sauce 1 cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar 1/4 cup kosher salt 6 garlic cloves , peeled and crushed 2 cups water 1/2 lb ice 1 1/2 lbs boneless pork butt 1 Combine mustard seeds, celery seeds, bay leaf, peppercorns, hot sauce, vinegar, sugar, salt, garlic and water in a saucepan. Place over medium-high heat until boiling, reduce to a simmer, and maintain for 3 minutes. Turn off heat and add ice. 2 Cut pork butt into 2" cubes. Place in a large zip top bag. When the brine is cool, pour it in as well. Press out as much air as possible and seal the bag. Refrigerate for a minimum of 3 days, turning bag a couple of times a day. 3 Keeps 2 weeks in the refrigerator; after that, drain and freeze. Note that this is NOT edible as is; it still has to be cooked!

Source: food.com

2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 onion 2 green bell peppers 3 celery ribs 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 5 garlic cloves , minced 3/4 lb pickled pork or 3/4 lb unsmoked thick slab bacon 3 bay leaves 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon hot sauce 1 lb dried red kidney beans , picked and sorted 2 quarts water 1 Place a 7 quart cast iron Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add oil and heat until shimmering. Add onion, bell pepper and celery. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until onion and celery are soft and translucent, 6-8 minutes. Add garlic, pickled pork, bay leaves, dried thyme, cayenne pepper, hot sauce and beans. Add water. Turn up to high and heat until boiling, stirring occasionally, 6-8 minutes. 2 Reduce heat to maintain a strong simmer. Cover tightly and cook 90 minutes, stirring every 30 minutes. Remove the lid and cook, uncovered, 30-40 minutes longer, maintaining a strong simmer. If you want your sauce a bit thicker and more gravy-like, use a potato masher to crush some of the beans. Remove bay leaves. 3 Bring 3 cups water to a full rolling boil. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, melt butter over high heat. When foaming subsides and butter begins to brown, add rice and salt. Saute until rice turns opaque and slightly tan. Add boiling water all at once - be very careful! Cover tightly, reduce to simmer and cook 17-20 minutes, until fully cooked. If you prefer your rice dry and fluffy, let stand off heat, uncovered, 5 minutes before serving. Serve beans over rice.

Source: food.com

1 lb cooked and chilled medium shrimp , minced 10 ounces chunky salsa 2 cups cooked rice ( Alton Brown's Baked Brown Rice would be great!) 1 large cucumber , seeded and diced 1 medium size green pepper , diced 3/4 cup thinly sliced green onion 2 tablespoons lime juice 3 garlic cloves , minced 8 cooked and chilled large shrimp red leaf lettuce 8 tablespoons chili sauce 1 Mix all ingredients, EXCEPT large shrimp, chili sauce and lettuce. 2 Chill 2 hours. 3 Line plates with lettuce leaves and divide shrimp and rice mixture among 4 plates. 4 Garnish with 2 of the large shrimp each and drizzle with chili sauce.

Source: food.com

6 ounces thick-cut bacon , cut into 1-inch strips 2 medium onions , finely chopped 1/2 tablespoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 whole star anise 3 whole cloves 3 tablespoons olive oil , divided 1/2 lb boneless beef chuck roast , ground coarse 1/2 lb boneless pork butt, ground coarse 1 1/4 cups white wine , divided 3 celery ribs , finely chopped 3 garlic cloves , minced 3/4 cup evaporated milk 3 cups beef broth 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms , finely chopped 2 garlic cloves , sliced 2 (28 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 1 tablespoon dried oregano 2 teaspoons dried marjoram 2 teaspoons dried basil 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 tablespoon ketchup 1 tablespoon sherry wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons kosher salt 1/2 lb spaghetti 1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese 1 Set an 8 qt cast iron Dutch oven over low heat and add the bacon. Cook until the fat renders and the bacon is crispy. Transfer bacon to a paper-towel lined plate. 2 Add onion, salt and pepper to fat in pot. Place star anise and cloves in a small cotton spice bag (or wrap in cheesecloth); lay the flat of a chef's knife across the spices and smash your fist on the blade to crack them (or use a mallet). Add the spice bag to the pot as well. Cook over low heat until onions break down and caramelize, about 45 minutes, stirring every few minutes. 3 Place a 4 qt saute pan over high heat and add 1 tbsp olive oil. When oil begins to emit wisps of smoke, add beef and pork. Stir constantly for 4-5 minutes until the meat is brown and broken into small chunks. Transfer to a colander set over a bowl. Return the saute pan to the high heat. 4 Deglaze saute pan with 1/2 cup white wine, scraping any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. When wine has reduced by half, turn off the heat. 5 When onions are mahogany brown, add celery and minced garlic. Cook over low heat for 30 minutes, until intensely fragrant. Remove and discard the spice bag. 6 Add the meat and reduced wine to Dutch oven. Add another 1/2 cup white wine, evaporated milk and beef broth. Add porcinis. Cook very slowly over low heat, covered, for 3 hours, stirring every 30 minutes. 7 Add 1 tbsp olive oil to saute pan and heat until shimmering over medium heat. Add sliced garlic and saute until fragrant, 30-45 seconds. Add tomatoes (with any juice in the cans), along with oregano, marjoram and basil. Cook over medium heat until most of the liquid evaporates, 25-30 minutes. 8 Reduce heat to low and add tomato paste, ketchup, sherry vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and 1/4 cup white wine. Simmer 30 minutes. 9 Add 1 tbsp olive oil to tomatoes and turn heat up to medium high. Stir vigorously and constantly for 2-3 minutes. Add tomatoes to meat mixture. Continue to simmer over low heat, uncovered, while preparing pasta. 10 Bring 4 quarts of water to a boil in a deep, narrow pot. Add salt. Add spaghetti when water is at a rolling boil. Stir for a few minutes to minimize sticking, then reduce heat to keep a steady but not violent boil. Start checking after 5 minutes; the pasta should be not-quite al dente; there should still be a little crunch in the center. Drain the pasta and add to the meat sauce, along with parmesan cheese. Cook another 4-5 minutes until pasta is al dente.

Source: food.com

4 ounces soymilk 4 ounces acai juice, grape juice or 4 ounces pomegranate juice 1 frozen banana 4 ounces frozen strawberries 4 ounces frozen blueberries 4 ounces frozen peaches 1 1. Combine the soy milk, juice, and fruit in a blender. Cover and refrigerate overnight or up to 8 hours. 2 2. In the morning or when fruit is thawed, blend fruit on lowest speed and slowly increase to medium speed. 3 3. Once medium speed is reached, blend for one minute. 4 4. Serve. 5 Note: I just copied this from the foodnetwork site but gave this my own flair. I used lactose free milk but don't see why one couldn't use regular, and used black currant juice. I also added some mango and papaya, sort of omitting the peaches almost all together. You can also use blackberries or any type of dark colored berry to get the addition of the antioxidants, but I can imagine this would taste good with any fruit. If you can't find a certain type of fruit in the frozen section, just buy it fresh, cut it up or wash it, then freeze in a plastic bag.

Source: food.com

6 hard-boiled eggs , cooled and peeled 1/2-1 teaspoon whole pink peppercorns, divided 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole white peppercorns 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorn 1/4-1/2 teaspoon whole green peppercorn 1/2 teaspoon caper liquid 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/8-1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 pinch sugar 1 Slice the eggs in half from top to bottom. Scoop the yolks into a medium mixing bowl and lay the whites aside. 2 Place all of the peppercorns, except 1/4-1/2 teaspoon of the pink peppercorns, into a spice grinder and process until ground well. Add the ground peppers, caper liquid, mayonnaise, mustard, salt and sugar to the egg yolks and using a fork, stir to thoroughly combine. 3 Place the mixture into a zip-top plastic bag and cut a small hole at one of the corners. Pipe the mixture into each of the white halves. 4 Coarsely grind the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of pink peppercorns and use to garnish the top of each egg. 5 Chill for at least 1 hour in the refrigerator before serving.

Source: food.com

unsalted butter , for the pan 12 ounces flour (plus extra for pan) 12 ounces grated carrots , medium grate (approximately 6 medium) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 10 ounces sugar (approximately 1 1/3 cups) 2 ounces dark brown sugar (approximately 1/4 cup firmly packed) 3 large eggs 6 ounces plain yogurt 6 ounces vegetable oil 1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 2 Butter and flour a 9-inch round and 3-inch deep cake pan. Line the bottom with parchment paper. Set aside. 3 Put the carrots into a large mixing bowl and set aside. 4 Put the flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices, and salt in the bowl of a food processor and process for 5 seconds. Add this mixture to the carrots and toss until they are well-coated with the flour. 5 In the bowl of the food processor combine the sugar, brown sugar, eggs, and yogurt. 6 With the processor still running drizzle in the vegetable oil. Pour this mixture into the carrot mixture and stir until just combined. Pour into the prepared cake pan and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 45 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees F and bake for another 20 minutes or until the cake reaches 205 to 210 degrees F in the center. 7 Remove the pan from the oven and allow cake to cool 15 minutes in the pan. After 15 minutes, turn the cake out onto a rack and allow cake to cool completely. Frost with cream cheese frosting after cake has cooled completely.

Source: food.com

One of the terrible things that well-intentioned food people do all of the time is get bored with things that everyone loves. Because there’s a there’s a near-constant stream of food media coming in, with time the “hot takes” on apple pie begin to feel monotonous, the “cool new thing to do with sweet potatoes” can cause inward groans and pumpkin/pumpkin-spiced things? I’ll let them tell you: “Pumpkin spice has ruined pumpkins,” says Alton Brown. “America has gone entirely too far in its pumpkin spice devotion,” says Eater, with a fair amount of evidence backing it up. The Washington Post likened pumpkin spice lattes to “liquefied fall-scented potpourri.” I, too, fell into this trap, something I hadn’t realized until I Snapchatted* making pumpkin bread a few weeks ago and have never received so many recipe requests. I didn’t get it at first — I mean, pumpkin bread is the most basic thing, right? And Google claims 5.7 million ways to make it. What could I possible add to the conversation? But as I was making it, I got very persnickety about it, bothered by a few things in the recipes I tried. First, none of them really filled out my loaf pan and I wondered why we were settling for less when we always wanted more. Second, I adore brown sugar in most things, but it makes for a rather brownish cake and the versions I made with only white sugar tasted no less awesome. Third, good pumpkin bread is always tender and plush inside, but why can’t it have a crispy lid too, the way my favorite pumpkin muffins do? Finally, small cans of pumpkin have 1 3/4 cups of puree in them. Most recipes use 1 cup pumpkin and I like to go all the way to 1 1/3 cups. That small amount leftover drives me batty. So, I scaled my recipe a little, and then a little more and until I ended up with an insanely towering pumpkin loaf with a crispy crackly impossible-not-to-pick off cinnamon-sugar lid that’s like a snickerdoodle landed on top of a pumpkin bread and if there was ever a time to shake off any pumpkin/pumpkin-spice skepticism, you are in the right place. You’re among friends. Next stop: hayrides, corn mazes, apple picking, flannel shirts, hot apple cider and Don’t say it, Deb! … decorative gourds. * @smittenkitchen, are you following? I hope you do. I’m having so much fun embarrassing myself over there. Also I share meal so-called plans, you know, real ones that include days like last Tuesday with the menu item “nope!” Toronto! I’ll be in Toronto a week from Saturday, 10/22 at Type Books at 7:30 p.m. in conversation with Toronto Star Food Editor Karon Lui. [Details] I’m actually going to be in town all weekend for the Canadian Food Bloggers Conference, which has kindly invited me to keynote, something I’m not terrified about at all, nope. Previously One year ago: Cannoli Pound Cake Two years ago: Better Chocolate Babka Three years ago: Purple Plum Torte Four years ago: Make Your Own Pumpkin Puree and Chicken Noodle Soup Five years ago: Apple Pie Cookies Six years ago: Roasted Eggplant Soup Seven years ago: Breakfast Apple Granola Crisp Eight years ago: Acorn Squash Quesadillas with Tomatillo Salsa Nine years ago: Gazpacho Salsa Ten! years ago: Cook’s Illustrated Classic Brownies And for the other side of the world: Six Months Ago: Carrot Tahini Muffins 1.5 Years Ago: Strawberry Rhubarb Soda Syrup 2.5 Years Ago: Dark Chocolate Coconut Macaroons 3.5 Years Ago: Bee Sting Cake 4.5 Years Ago: Banana Bread Crepe Cake with Butterscotch Pumpkin Bread This is a towering, craggy pumpkin bread with a crisp cinnamon sugar lid that is impossible not to pick off in deeply satisfying bark-like flecks. Trust me, someone in my family notnamingnames did exactly that this morning, and I almost cannot blame them. Very key here is the size of your loaf pan because this will fill out every speck of it before it is done. Mine holds 6 liquid cups; it’s 8×4 inches on the bottom and 9×5 inches on the top. If yours is even slightly smaller or you’re nervous, go ahead and scoop out a little to make a muffin or two. You won’t regret that either. This also uses an excess of cinnamon sugar on top — it’s always too much and I cannot stop because I love the way it spills off when I slice it and then you can slide your slices through the extra. If this is going to bother you, however, go ahead and use half. You can also make this as muffins. It should make about 18 standard ones and you can distribute the cinnamon sugar (perhaps make 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar and 1/2 teaspoons of cinnamon worth) across the tops before you bake them. They should bake for 25 to 30 minutes. I’ve also made this with mashed sweet potatoes and other squashes with success (but if it’s more wet and thus the batter ends up more loose, be caaaaareful as it could throw this towering loaf into a spilling-over situation). And I’ve done it with half whole-wheat flour. Finally, I know someone is going to say “that’s way too much sugar!” but please keep in mind this loaf is gigantic, easily 1.5x a normal one and the sugar is scaled accordingly. You can decrease it if you wish but we have made this now several times and many people have commented about how in-check the sugar level tastes, not over the top at all. Bread1 15-ounce can (1 3/4 cups) pumpkin puree1/2 cup (120 ml) vegetable or another neutral cooking oil or melted butter (115 grams)3 large eggs1 2/3 (330 grams) cups granulated sugar1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder3/4 teaspoon baking soda3/4 teaspoon fine sea or table salt3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamonHeaped 1/4 teaspoon fresh grated nutmegHeaped 1/4 teaspoon ground gingerTwo pinches of ground cloves2 1/4 cups (295 grams) all-purpose flour To Finish1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated sugar1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a 6-cup loaf pan or coat it with nonstick spray. In a large bowl, whisk together pumpkin, oil, eggs and sugar until smooth. Sprinkle baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinanmon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves over batter and whisk until well-combined. Add flour and stir with a spoon, just until mixed. Scrape into prepared pan and smooth the top. In a small dish, or empty measuring cup, stir sugar and cinnamon together. Sprinkle over top of batter. Bake bread for 65 to 75 minutes until a tester poked into all parts of cake (both the top and center will want to hide pockets of uncooked batter) come out batter-free, turning the cake once during the baking time for even coloring. You can cool it in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove it, or cool it completely in there. The latter provides the advantage of letting more of the loose cinnamon sugar on top adhere before being knocked off. Cake keeps at room temperature as long as you can hide it. I like to keep mine in the tin with a piece of foil or plastic just over the cut end and the top exposed to best keep the lid crisp as long as possible.

Source: smittenkitchen.com

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